Refine Search

New Search

Result: 1

(searched for: doi:10.2307/3024262)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Allan J. Barry
The China Quarterly, Volume 8, pp 20-33; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0305741000001764

Abstract:
After three years of agricultural calamities, both natural and man-made, China has begun the importation on a substantial scale of foodstuffs— a dramatic departure from previous policy. The chief beneficiaries abroad are the grain producers of Canada and Australia. Actual quantities involved may be regarded as small from the standpoint of total Chinese food consumption, but remarkably significant when considered in terms of the actual addition to domestic supplies of wheat and barley, the probable consumption of grain in the seaboard cities, the amount of foreign exchange required, the concomitant decline in other imports (including machinery and raw materials), and the enormous demands usually made upon transportation facilities by agricultural shipments from the interior to the coast. These food purchases are also significant from the standpoint of both Canada and Australia.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top