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(searched for: doi:10.1016/s0959-8022(00)00002-3)
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Susan Scott, Wanda Orlikowski
Information Systems Research; https://doi.org/10.1287/isre.2021.1056

Abstract:
Digital transformation research shows how waves of digitalization produce strategic changes within and across firms, enabling new forms of value creation. We argue that different but no less important processes of digital transformation are generated by the undertow produced by these waves. Digital undertow, a corollary effect of waves of digitalization, profoundly influences how firms operate by transforming the industry standards that coordinate and regulate their core business activities. This is producing what we refer to as digital displacement, a process that is significantly challenging the capacity of standards to effectively manage industry operations in the digital age.
, Geoff Walsham
Published: 2 October 2012
Information Systems Journal, Volume 23, pp 351-370; https://doi.org/10.1111/isj.12001

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 July 2012
Information and Organization, Volume 22, pp 188-207; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infoandorg.2012.04.001

Abstract:
This paper argues that practice-based management and IS literature has tended to portray a voluntaristic account of human agency that downplays the contribution to emergent social outcomes of more deeply rooted psychological dimensions of the human condition. Within the IS research community, this tendency is exemplified in work using Giddens' structuration theory, which, whilst acknowledging the importance of human interpretive properties, has foregrounded cognitive aspects to interpretation at the expense of important non-cognitive ingredients such as affect and biographical identity. These non-cognitive ingredients are less amenable for study using the structurational model, but receive comprehensive treatment elsewhere in Giddens' work. Accordingly, it is argued that a useful direction for future theory development would be to seek a more balanced account of humans' co-constitutive relationship with technology in practice. This could be achieved by supplementing the structurational perspective, with its primary focus on emergent social structure, with a more explicit engagement with Giddens' broader concern with emergent biographical structure. An initial integrative framework is offered as a first step in this direction.
Marisa D'Mello, Thomas Hylland Eriksen
Published: 30 April 2010
Information and Organization, Volume 20, pp 81-110; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infoandorg.2010.03.001

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Thomas Østerlie, Ole Martin Asak, Ole Georg Pettersen, Håvard Tronhus
Artificial Intelligence in Theory and Practice III pp 327-342; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-12113-5_20

Abstract:
Based on a study of ICT use at an airport security checkpoint, this paper explores a possible explanation to the paradox that travelers find existing airport security measures inadequate while at the same time believing air travel to be sufficiently secure. We pursue this explanation by showing that, for the security checkpoint to function properly in relation to the overall function of the airport, travelers have to be enrolled in a particular program of action. They are then locked into this program through sanctions. Travelers are forced into participating in a system many of them find ethically and morally objectionable. Yet, active participation makes it difficult for them to object to the moral and ethical issues of their actions without damning themselves. Our explanation of the security paradox is, therefore, that while travelers remain critical of airport security, they avoid damning themselves by criticizing the system in terms of its own logic. They have been made accomplices.
Michael Barrett, David Grant,
The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Volume 42, pp 6-22; https://doi.org/10.1177/0021886305285299

Abstract:
In this introduction to the special issue, the authors explore a number of connections between recent thinking about change in the organization studies (OS) literature and debates about information and communication technology (ICT) and change in the information systems (IS) literature. The authors examine these debates and highlight their potential significance for understanding ICT and organizational change. They argue that what is needed are studies such as those in this special issue that draw on and combine the insights provided by both the OS and the IS literatures to advance the study and practice of ICT-related change.
Melanie Wilson,
The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Volume 14, pp 17-43; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsis.2004.11.007

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Bunmi Cynthia Adeleye, Fenio Annansingh, Miguel Baptista Nunes
International Journal of Information Management, Volume 24, pp 167-180; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2003.10.004

A. Al-Taitoon, C. Sörensen
37th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2004. Proceedings of the; https://doi.org/10.1109/hicss.2004.1265086

Abstract:
The aim of this paper is to address the role of ICT-support call centres in supporting mobile professionals. In global organisations, mobile professionals require constant and continuous access to information services. In modern global banking firms, ICTs are intensively utilised for electronic transactional processing and in supporting banking professionals in accomplishing their global tasks across geographical locations and time zones. The use of ICTs by global mobile bankers is crucial to access real-time information, anytime and anywhere. In their remote mobility, banking professionals may experience technology failure or difficulties in accessing information services. This inability of the banking mobile professionals in utilising ICTs could have serious consequences in terms of risk on the bank operations and profit. The ICT-support call-centres play major roles in supporting the mobile user. This paper discusses how a global help desk unit accomplishes this role in a global banking organisation. This is achieved through analysis of the call tickets from the global helpdesk tracking system.
Erica L. Wagner, Robert D. Galliers, Susan V. Scott
Artificial Intelligence in Theory and Practice III, Volume 143, pp 433-451; https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-8095-6_24

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Carsten Sørensen, , Shirin Madon, Dasha Klyachko, Ian Hosein, Justine Johnstone
Lecture Notes in Control and Information Sciences pp 297-316; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-35489-7_20

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