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(searched for: doi:10.5171/2013.867520)
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Published: 1 November 2020
Medical Hypotheses, Volume 144, pp 110114-110114; doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2020.110114

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Published: 14 November 2017
Frontiers in Pediatrics, Volume 5; doi:10.3389/fped.2017.00223

Abstract:
Recent findings suggest that infection (and sepsis) stand alone as the only plausible mechanism of causation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and accordingly achieves congruence with all clinicopathological and epidemiological findings. This review examines the role of infection in the pathogenesis of SIDS in the context of the major risk factor of prone sleep position. The study explores how sleep position could interact with the immune system and inflammatory response via vagal neural connections, which could play key roles in gut and immune homeostasis. A plausible and congruent clinicopathological and epidemiological paradigm is suggested.
Published: 23 January 2017
by BMJ
Archives of Disease in Childhood, Volume 102, pp 767-772; doi:10.1136/archdischild-2016-312327

Abstract:
Despite decades of investigation and millions of dollars spent, the cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) eludes researchers. It is timely therefore to reconsider the reasons for this failure and to explore how research might go forward with better prospects. This review assesses SIDS research in the context of clinicopathological and epidemiological features and determines that only infection attains congruence.
Published: 3 June 2015
Frontiers in Immunology, Volume 6; doi:10.3389/fimmu.2015.00269

Abstract:
The gut microbiome influences the development of the immune system of young mammals; the establishment of a normal gut microbiome is thought to be important for the health of the infant during its early development. As the role of bacteria in the causation of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is backed by strong evidence, the balance between host immunity and potential bacterial pathogens is likely to be pivotal. Bacterial colonisation of the infant colon is influenced by age, mode of delivery, diet, environment, and antibiotic exposure. The gut microbiome influences several systems including gut integrity and development of the immune system; therefore, gut microflora could be important in protection against bacteria and/or their toxins identified in SIDS infants. The aims of the review are to explore 1) the role of the gut microbiome in relation to the developmentally critical period in which most SIDS cases occur; 2) the concept of an abnormal gut microbiome causing inflammation resulting in transit of bacteria from the lumen into the bloodstream; and 3) clinical, physiological, pathological and microbiological evidence for bacteraemia leading to the final events in SIDS pathogenesis.
Amanda R. Highet, Anne M. Berry, Karl A. Bettelheim,
International Journal of Medical Microbiology, Volume 304, pp 735-741; doi:10.1016/j.ijmm.2014.05.007

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