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(searched for: doi:10.1080/15267431.2021.2019743)
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Published: 30 September 2022
Health Communication pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2022.2128157

Abstract:
People in recovery for opioid use must navigate their chronic illness and the corresponding stigma. Despite the prevalence of opioid use in the United States, contradictory determinations about the curability and responsibility of addiction remain. These contractions provide a complicated site from which to examine power in a health context where misinformation can be costly. In this study, we applied contrapuntal analysis, the corresponding method of relational dialectics theory, to examine the meaning of addiction from the perspective of people in recovery for opioid use disorder. Findings revealed two discourses: the Discourse of Addiction as a Disruptive Choice (DADC) and the Discourse of Addiction as Bad Luck (DABL) that interplayed through contractive practices and synchronic interplay. Findings also revealed a new contractive practice we term “mobbing.”
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Volume 39, pp 2680-2700; https://doi.org/10.1177/02654075221087462

Abstract:
Heterosexual women have intersecting identities that are privileged (i.e., sexuality) and marginalized (i.e., gender), suggesting a complicated site to examine power in the process of dating where meaning has become taken-for-granted over time. In this study, we utilized relational dialectics theory’s (RDT’s) corresponding method, contrapuntal analysis, to examine a group that holds fluctuating societal power in the context of heterosexuality and dating. Findings from the responses of women ( n = 104) revealed two discourses that competed to illuminate the meaning of heterosexual dating from the perspective of women: the dominant Discourse that Dating is Romantic and Necessary (DDRN) and the marginal Discourse that Dating is Restrictive and Unrealistic (DDRU). These discourses interplayed through contractive practices (i.e., disqualification and naturalization), diachronic separation, synchronic interplay (i.e., entertaining, countering, and negating), and dialogic transformation (i.e., discursive hybridization and aesthetic moment), illuminating a discursive struggle that both reified and resisted the DDRN.
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