Refine Search

New Search

Results: 4

(searched for: doi:10.1007/s00300-021-02912-6)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Published: 24 May 2022
by MDPI
Diversity, Volume 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14060415

Abstract:
Subgenus Cryobius is one of the most numerous among the megafauna of tundra soils, but studies on its species distribution, taxonomy, and ecology are lacking. Phylogeny and phylogeography reconstructions of insects with taxonomic complexity have become possible using an integrative approach. Here, we report that specimens of Pterostichus (Cryobius) mandibularoides, described from North America, were detected in Eurasia. Thus, this species has a trans-Beringian range with high distributions in North America, as well as a disjunctive part of the range on the northeastern edge of Asia within Chukotka and Wrangel Island. Eight COI haplotypes with closed relationships (1–2 mutation steps) were detected within the whole range, and one 28S rRNA haplotype was detected for Eurasia. Bayesian phylogeny revealed that P. mandibularoides had the most recent common ancestor with sister species P. brevicornis and P. nivalis. Mean genetic distances of both markers were similar and higher between P. mandibularoides and both P. brevicornis and P. nivalis (>5% ± 1.0%) than between the latter species (<4% ± 1.0%). The obtained results change the previous view about brevicornis group stock differentiation within Cryobius in the Arctic and require a revision of the phylogeny and phylogeography of brevicornis group species and Cryobius altogether.
Published: 16 February 2022
by MDPI
Abstract:
The geographic patterns of genetic and morphological variability in ground beetles were examined throughout Northern Eurasia and North America using the most abundant circumpolar tundra subspecies, Pterostichus (Cryobius) brevicornis brevicornis (Kirby, 1837), as a model. Phylogenetic structure was assessed on the basis of a Bayesian approach using two DNA markers (partial sequences of the COI and 28S rRNA genes), while phylogeographic patterns and population genetic diversity were estimated using the COI gene only. Morphological patterns were analysed using elliptical Fourier coefficients that were calculated based on the pronotum and male genitalia shape outlines. The subspecies shares 23 COI haplotypes throughout its entire circumpolar range, while eight haplotypes of 28S rRNA were detected in Northern Eurasia. Phylogenetic analysis did not reveal subdivided species lineages with strict geographical imprint. The network, FST and uncorrected pairwise divergence analyses showed that the genetic distances between populations increase by longitude from Northeastern Asia to Europe. The genetic variability among the five studied geographical population groups of P. b. brevicornis was relatively high. The MANOVA showed significant regional divergence between local populations in Northern Eurasia based on both morphological markers, but only male genitalia variability was geographically structured. Neither the pronotum shape nor the male genitalia shape aligned with the phylogeographic patterns discovered on the basis of COI sequences. The genetic (COI) marker had more variation within, rather than among, population groups in addition to morphology of pronotum but not male genitalia.
Frontiers in Conservation Science, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.3389/fcosc.2021.752213

Abstract:
The unsustainable use of ecosystems by human societies has put global biodiversity in peril. Bees are, in this context, a popular example of a highly diversified group of pollinators whose collapse is a major concern given the invaluable ecosystem services they provide. Amongst them, bumblebees (Bombus) have increasingly drawn the attention of scientists due to their dramatic population declines globally. This regression has converted them into popular conservation entities, making them the second most studied group of bees worldwide. However, in addition to have become relevant models in the fields of ecology, evolution and biogeography, bumblebees have also been used as models for studying wild bee decline and conservation worldwide. Integrating evidence from the comparative ecology and resilience of bumblebees and wild bees, I discuss the relevance of using Bombus as radars for wild bee decline worldwide. Responses of bumblebees to environmental changes are generally not comparable with those of wild bees because of their relatively long activity period, their inherent sensitivity to high temperatures, their relatively generalist diet breadth and many aspects arising from their eusocial behavior. Moreover, important differences in the available historical data between bumblebees and other bees make comparisons of conservation status even more arduous. Overall, these results reinforce the need for conservation actions that consider a higher level of understanding of ecological diversity in wild bees, highlight the need for an updated and more extensive sampling of these organisms, and emphasize that more caution is required when extrapolating trends from model species.
Saeed Mohamadzade Namin, Tae-Yoon Park, Chuleui Jung,
Published: 16 October 2021
Polar Biology, Volume 44, pp 2209-2216; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-021-02952-y

Abstract:
The bumble bee Bombus polaris (Curtis 1835) is known from the northernmost region of Greenland. But how it can survive there, where in terms of geographic origin it came from, and which species in addition to B. pyrrhopygus (Friese 1902) genetically it is most closely related to are insufficiently answered questions that have motivated us to carry out this study. On the basis of a molecular analysis of the cytochrome oxidase I gene of a B. (Alpinobombus) polaris from North Greenland (82° 48′ N; 42° 14′ W), we conclude that the female specimen we analysed was most closely related to the Canadian populations of B. polaris. Geographic proximity, occurrence of B. polaris on Ellesmere Island and wind direction are likely factors that have aided B. polaris to establish itself in northern and eastern Greenland. The presence of five haplotypes in the studied sequences from Greenland indicates a moderately high level of genetic diversity of B. polaris in Greenland, reflecting the successful adaptation of B. polaris populations. In the broader context of entomological life in the high Arctic, our results on B. polaris allow us to conclude that the survival of pollinating species in the high Arctic under the changing climate scenario depends not only on the weather but also on an individual’s opportunity to continue to locate suitable food sources, i.e. pollen and nectar in the case of B. polaris. This aspect, briefly touched upon in this study, is of relevance not just to B. polaris, but the Arctic entomofauna generally.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top