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(searched for: doi:10.29328/journal.ijcar.1001010)
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Mulachew Nigatu, Finot Debebe, Wagari Tuli
Published: 1 May 2022
Open Access Emergency Medicine, pp 235-247; https://doi.org/10.2147/oaem.s366218

Abstract:
Background: As airway issues or respiratory failures are the leading causes of death in the first hours after an injury, nurses’ understanding and practice of fundamental airway and breathing therapies remain “cornerstones” of competent emergency care. As a result, the goal of this study was to evaluate nurses’ airway and breathing management knowledge, practice, and associated factors in the emergency departments of selected governmental hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: During the study period of April 12 to April 30, 2021, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with a thorough enumeration of all respondents using the census method. The data were collected from the respondents using a self-administered and structured questionnaire. Data quality was ensured by pre-testing the tools and giving data collectors training. The data were analyzed using the SPSS version 25 program. The researchers used mean, frequency, bivariable, and multiple logistic regression analyses. Only P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 102 people took part in this study, with a 96.2% response rate. Females made up slightly more than half of the respondents 52.9%, and their ages ranged from 24 to 48 years old, with a mean age of 29.50 (SD ± 4.96). Only 45.1% of those polled were well versed in the emergency airway and breathing management. About 90.2% of the respondents had a BSc degree. At p< 0.05, having previously received airway and breathing management training was statistically correlated with knowledge. Conclusion: Although many of the practice problems were correctly answered, the respondents in this study had insufficient knowledge of airway and breathing management. As a result, it is critical to give nursing training because it is strongly linked to the knowledge and practice of nurses.
Hailemichael Abate,
Published: 1 December 2020
Open Access Emergency Medicine, pp 459-469; https://doi.org/10.2147/oaem.s290074

Abstract:
Background: Pre-hospital emergency care is a medical care given to patients before arrival in the hospital after activation of the emergency team. Poor knowledge and practice about pre-hospital emergency care hurt the health outcomes of the patients. Objective: This study aimed to assess knowledge and practice nurses at the University of Gondar Compressive Specialized Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods: An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March 20 to April 10, 2020. A stratified sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Data were collected using a pretested structured self-administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. To explain study variables, frequency tables and percentages were used. Logistic regression analysis was used to see the association between independent and dependent variables. Results: Out of the total 378 respondents, less than half (42.9%) had good knowledge; similarly, 49.5% of them had good practice about pre-hospital emergency care. Male sex and attend formal training were significant associations with both knowledge and practice of pre-hospital emergency nursing care. Male participants (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 6.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) (3.79– 11.36)) and having training (AOR=1.74, 95% CI (1.83– 3.66)) were significantly associated with knowledge of pre-hospital emergency care, whereas male sex (AOR=1.73, 95% CI (1.09– 2.73)) and having training (AOR=6.16, 95% CI (2.69– 14.10)) were significantly associated with the practice of pre-hospital emergency care. Conclusion: Knowledge and practice of nurses regarding pre-hospital emergency care was found to be inadequate as compared to previous studies. Male sex and attend formal training showed a positive and significant association with both knowledge and practice of pre-hospital emergency nursing care. The responsible body ought to allow professional development and attending formal training for nurses.
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