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(searched for: doi:10.1080/02763893.2019.1604463)
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Jennifer Boger
Published: 29 June 2022
Abstract:
There is a great deal of untapped potential for technology to support older adults, but to realise this potential technology development must go beyond good usability and addressing perceived needs to complement older adults’ holistic lived experiences. This paper presents culture change, human-centered design, and ethical by design as complementary concepts that can be leveraged to gain a deeper understanding of how to better design, develop, and evaluate technology to support older adults. The application of these concepts is framed by the theory of transactionalism, whereby there is reciprocal dynamic interplay between how these concepts impact technology, technologists and other stakeholders, and ultimately the concepts themselves in the context of technology development. New paradigms such as the ones discussed in this paper can result in technologies that are better aligned with more complex and fundamental aspects of human nature.
, Michael A. Light, , Megan Moore, Terri Lewinson
Published: 13 June 2022
Journal of Gerontological Social Work pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2022.2087129

Abstract:
Place and health are intricately bound. COVID has amplified system burdens and health risks within the housing care continuum, in which older adults with chronic illnesses are disproportionately represented. The paper identifies the health experiences of older adults with severe conditions living in and moving through temporary avoidance hotels during the COVID-19 pandemic. An interpretive descriptive approach was taken with qualitative chart data and provider observation to represent the experiences of 14 older avoidance hotel residents living with serious illnesses. Through provider documentation, we illustrate trends pre-pandemic, in the first nine months of the pandemic, and the second nine months. Such trends include strengths and opportunities such as the health-affirming nature of avoidance hotels, their potential in generating continuity of care and permanent housing, and synergy between harm reduction approaches and palliative care. Challenges were also identified in catering to the diverse medical, behavioral, and psychosocial-spiritual needs of older and seriously ill residents and the consequences of geographic dispersion on health care, health behaviors, and informal care networks. Through these strengths and challenges, avoidance hotels present essential lessons in considering future housing and healthcare intervention and implementation that addresses the needs of older seriously ill people facing homelessness and housing precarity.
Natalie Ulitsa, ,
Published: 1 March 2021
Geriatric Nursing, Volume 42, pp 440-446; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gerinurse.2021.02.007

Abstract:
Culture change models are intended to improve the quality of life and care of nursing home residents. Using longitudinal qualitative methodology, this study evaluated the effectiveness of implementing culture change on the main stakeholders living and working in an Israeli nursing home. Eight focus groups with nursing home residents, family members and staff members (N = 57) were conducted at two-time points: one year after and two years after implementing a culture change model. Using thematic content analysis and comparing the experiences of each group and across time, the results revealed that implementing culture change in a nursing home is a complex process, which requires am adaptation in the values, expectations, and perceptions of care of all those involved. Particular attention should be paid to the unique needs of each stakeholder group, while ensuring their engagement and cooperation in the change process.
, Gunilla Strandberg
Published: 25 February 2021
Nordic Journal of Nursing Research, Volume 41, pp 149-157; https://doi.org/10.1177/2057158521995994

Abstract:
Culture change in organizations may affect employees and change agents are often a forgotten resource; their perspective is often overlooked in research. The aim of the study was to illuminate experiences of being a change agent in order to improve residential care of older people. Interviews were performed with 15 change agents who participated in a large culture transformation in residential care for older people. The study followed COREQ guidelines and content analysis was used to interpret the text. The analysis revealed that the change agents felt chosen when they accepted the challenge to become a change agent, but they also felt that transferring the message to co-workers was demanding. Conflicting demands about measuring care and aggravating circumstances to implement change were described. The results indicate that change agents benefit from preparation for the role itself as they have a great responsibility on their shoulders. In making the process more successful, all co-workers should be involved in the change process from the beginning.
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