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(searched for: doi:10.1080/02763893.2018.1561594)
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Sarah Hillcoat-Nallétamby, Jim Ogg, Alexandra Sardani
Published: 29 September 2021
by CAIRN
Retraite et société, pp 141-161; https://doi.org/10.3917/rs1.086.0142

, Heather Carlile Carter
Published: 4 September 2020
Journal of Aging and Environment, Volume 35, pp 161-187; https://doi.org/10.1080/26892618.2020.1815922

Abstract:
Due to continued societal affluence, the households of many older people aging in place contain innumerable items, each with a complex story of origin, selection, and provenance. Excess possession accumulation can induce stress, create fall hazards, and impact indoor air quality. Often the burden passes to heirs who distribute or eliminate what is left behind after the death of the elder, an unpleasant task no matter the circumstances. Although academic discourse addresses the disbandment of households during late-life residential downsizing, issues related to accumulation and dispossession within the lives of people who continue to reside at home remain unexplored. The question, What is the collective cost of too much stuff? is a complex social issue for older people and their families, and one that requires additional research. This study reports possession management issues identified in a qualitative analysis of interviews with ten late-life older-old adults aging in place. Findings indicate that excess accumulation of possessions in a long-occupied home can lead to personal maladjustment and familial stress regarding eventual possession divestment. While future research must identify better strategies to alleviate the impact, this paper proposes active possession management as a necessary intervention in supporting older adults who age in place.
Michael James Buckland,
Published: 8 January 2020
Housing, Care and Support, Volume 23, pp 15-26; https://doi.org/10.1108/hcs-02-2019-0007

Abstract:
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore and compare the motivations and expectations that older people have when choosing to move into either a private or housing association (HA) extra care housing (ECH) scheme, and any effects this had on its residents. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study is based on findings from four HA schemes in Tower Hamlets, London, and one private scheme in Warwickshire. Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with five women and three men of varying backgrounds, from schemes managed by different associations and companies. Interview transcripts were coded and analysed thematically. Findings All residents moved into ECH in response to deteriorating health. However, almost all residents had felt obliged to move by others, generally their children. Few residents had any expectations of ECH on arrival, but many developed high expectations of an increased sense of independence and security and of an improved social life. ECH appeared to be beneficial for residents’ health and well-being. Research limitations/implications The inability to recruit an equal number of people from HA and private scheme, alongside the small sample size, may compromise the external validity of any conclusions drawn from any comparisons. Practical implications This research identifies a lack of knowledge about ECH among the general population and offers insight into areas of poor management within ECH schemes which could be improved. Social implications Inadequacies in the ECH model could be attributed to failures in the current health and social care system. Differences between expectations and perceptions of HA vs private schemes should be acknowledged and responded to. Originality/value This is a rare example of research exploring the relationships between ECH residents’ motivations and expectations (Hillcoat-Nallétamby and Sardani, 2019), and between those in HA vs private schemes.
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