Refine Search

New Search

Result: 1

(searched for: doi:10.29328/journal.hps.1001001)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
, Mirei Kawagoe, Yuu Kajiwara, Keiko Harada, Yurika Nishida, Keisuke Yamada, Rika Kawabe, Junpei Yokota, Chiaki Yamashiro, Yu Odake, et al.
Published: 8 June 2020
Journal: PLoS ONE
Abstract:
High heeled shoes have long been worn in society and they are known to cause biomechanical imbalances to not only the foot, but the whole musculoskeletal system. This study aims to show the detailed changes that happen to the shape of the transverse arch of the foot in high heels, using two different inclination degrees. 68 women participated in this study. Two custom-made high heels were made with inclinations of 15 degrees and 30 degrees (cm). A weight-bearing ultrasound was used to assess the coronal view of the transverse arch in standing. ANOVA and Tuckey tests were used to compare the results between 0 degrees, 15 degrees and 30 degrees inclinations. The transverse arch height was slightly increased as the heel height increased (0DI-15DI: p = 0.5852 / 15DI-30DI: p = 0.395 / 0DI-30DI: p = 0.0593). The transverse arch length (0DI-15DI: p = 0.0486 / 15DI-30DI: p = 0.0004 / 0DI-30DI: p = 0.1105) and the area under the metatarsal heads (0DI-15DI: p = 0.0422 / 15DI-30DI: p = 0.0180 / 0DI-30DI: p = 0.9463) significantly decreased as the heel height increased. The main changes were viewed in the 30 degrees inclinations compared to 0 degrees inclination. When the toes are dorsiflexed in high heels, it stimulates the Windlass mechanism which in turn stiffens the plantar fascia and adducts the metatarsal heads, while the soft tissues shrink in response to loads. High heels affected the shape of the transverse arch even in short term standing, and these effects increased as the height of the heel increased.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top