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Reckoning with Slavery pp 29-54; doi:10.1215/9781478021452-002

Joseph R. Winters
Published: 21 May 2021
Beyond Man pp 245-268; doi:10.1215/9781478021339-010

Reckoning with Slavery pp 141-169; doi:10.1215/9781478021452-005

Published: 10 May 2021
Demography; doi:10.1215/00703370-9304855

Abstract:
The comparative study of perceived physical and mental health in general—and the comparative study of health between the native-born and immigrants, in particular—requires that the groups understand survey questions inquiring about their health in the same way and display similar response patterns. After all, observed differences in perceived health may not reflect true differences but rather cultural bias in the health measures. Research on cross-country measurement equivalence between immigrants and natives on self-reported health measures has received very limited attention to date, resulting in a growing demand for the validation of existing perceived health measures using samples of natives and immigrants and establishing measurement equivalence of health-related assessment tools. This study, therefore, aims to examine measurement equivalence of self-reported physical and mental health indicators between immigrants and natives in the United States. Using pooled data from the 2015–2017 IPUMS Health Surveys, we examine the cross-group measurement equivalence properties of five concepts that are measured by multiple indicators: (1) perceived limitations in activities of daily life; (2) self-reported disability; (3) perceived functional limitations; (4) perceived financial stress; and (5) nonspecific psychological distress. Furthermore, we examine the comparability of these data among respondents of different ethnoracial origins and from different regions of birth, who report few versus many years since migration, their age, gender, and the language used to respond to the interview (e.g., English vs. Spanish). We test for measurement equivalence using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis. The results reveal that health scales are comparable across the examined groups. This finding allows drawing meaningful conclusions about similarities and differences among natives and immigrants on measures of perceived health in these data.
, Michel Boudreaux, , Sandra J. Newman
Published: 10 May 2021
Demography; doi:10.1215/00703370-9305166

Abstract:
Programs that provide affordable and stable housing may contribute to better child health and thus to fewer missed days of school. Drawing on a unique linkage of survey and administrative data, we use a quasi-experimental approach to examine the impact of rental assistance programs on missed days of school due to illness. We compare missed school days due to illness among children receiving rental assistance with those who will enter assistance within two years of their interview, the average length of waitlists for federal rental assistance. Overall, we find that children who receive rental assistance miss fewer days of school due to illness relative to those in the pseudo-waitlist group. We demonstrate that rental assistance leads to a reduction in the number of health problems among children and thus to fewer days of school missed due to illness. We find that the effect of rental assistance on missed school days is stronger for adolescents than for younger children. Additionally, race-stratified analyses reveal that rental assistance leads to fewer missed days due to illness among non-Hispanic White and Hispanic/Latino children; this effect, however, is not evident for non-Hispanic Black children, the largest racial/ethnic group receiving assistance. These findings suggest that underinvestment in affordable housing may impede socioeconomic mobility among disadvantaged non-Hispanic White and Hispanic/Latino children. In contrast, increases in rental assistance may widen racial/ethnic disparities in health among disadvantaged children, and future research should examine why this benefit is not evident for Black children.
, Anna Popinchalk, Kristen Lagasse Burke, Selena Anjur-Dietrich
Published: 10 May 2021
Demography; doi:10.1215/00703370-9295218

Abstract:
Women's ability to control their fertility through contraception and abortion has been shown to contribute to improvements in education and employment. At the same time, their employment and wages decline substantially when they transition to motherhood. About one-third of births are unintended, and it is unknown whether the impact of motherhood on employment, hours, and wages is smaller for women who planned their transition into motherhood compared with those who did not. To explore this, we examine fixed-effects models that estimate labor market outcomes using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979–2014. We estimate models for Black and White women and find that the relationship between motherhood and employment is significantly more negative among White women who plan their transition into motherhood than among those who have an unplanned first birth. Among those who remain employed, we find that those with a planned first birth work fewer hours and have lower wages relative to those with unplanned births. We do not find significant evidence that the association between motherhood and labor market outcomes differs by fertility planning among Black women. Prior research shows how women's choices are structurally constrained by sociocultural norms and expectations and by a labor market that may not readily accommodate motherhood. In this context, our findings may reflect differences in women's motherhood and employment preferences and their ability to act on those preferences. Our analysis also makes a novel contribution to the large body of research that associates unplanned births with negative outcomes.
Patrick Fessenbecker, Bryan Yazell
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 69-81; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851534

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 135-141; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851576

Aimee Seu
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 46-46; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851408

Mitchell Gauvin
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 82-100; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851548

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rebecca J. DeRoo
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, Volume 36, pp 215-229; doi:10.1215/02705346-8838613

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Dominique Bluher
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, Volume 36, pp 187-213; doi:10.1215/02705346-8838601

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rebecca J. DeRoo, Homay King
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, Volume 36, pp 1-7; doi:10.1215/02705346-8838505

Abstract:
Agnès Varda achieved success with award-winning films spanning a directorial career of more than six decades; in the last years of her life she became a major public figure in the global press and on social media. Retrospectives following her death in March 2019 have further sparked interest and acclaim across generations. Her final film, Varda by Agnès (Varda par Agnès, France, 2019), continues to be screened globally. Varda has attracted important scholarly and critical attention not only for her prolific cinematic career but also for her work across visual media, from photography to installation art. Moreover, people view her as someone who surmounted obstacles—creating her own production company and making work largely outside the mainstream industry—and who also confronted those obstacles on behalf of others, participating in women's demonstrations and public activism into the final years of her life. Now is a moment when everyone is discovering or looking anew at Varda.
Colleen Kennedy-Karpat
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, Volume 36, pp 231-239; doi:10.1215/02705346-8838625

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kelley Conway
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, Volume 36, pp 109-125; doi:10.1215/02705346-8838565

Yinka Shonibare
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 148-151; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971468

John Manuel Arias
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 25-26; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851226

Monica B. Pearl
Radical History Review, Volume 2021, pp 217-225; doi:10.1215/01636545-8841814

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Emily K. Hobson, Dan Royles
Radical History Review, Volume 2021, pp 1-8; doi:10.1215/01636545-8841646

Abstract:
We write the introduction to “The AIDS Crisis Is Not Over,” this special issue of the Radical History Review, in strange times. It is September 2020, and we are nine months into the COVID-19 global pandemic. Around the world, close to a million have died and 28 million have contracted the novel coronavirus. In the United States alone, over 190,000 have died and almost 6.5 million have tested positive. In all likelihood, we will still be fighting COVID-19 when this issue is published in May 2021 and will be dealing with the social and economic fallout from the pandemic for much longer.
Sayan Bhattacharya
Radical History Review, Volume 2021, pp 151-156; doi:10.1215/01636545-8841730

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Robert Franco
Radical History Review, Volume 2021, pp 9-20; doi:10.1215/01636545-8841658

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Devon Betts
Radical History Review, Volume 2021, pp 157-163; doi:10.1215/01636545-8841742

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jih-Fei Cheng
Radical History Review, Volume 2021, pp 143-150; doi:10.1215/01636545-8841718

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Octavio Zaya
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 140-140; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971426

Chika Okeke-Agulu, Salah M. Hassan
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 4-5; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971229

Monique Kerman
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 24-39; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971271

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Natasha Becker
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 14-22; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971257

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Amelia Jones
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 96-110; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971328

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kendell Geers
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 154-157; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971384

Susette Min
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 54-69; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971300

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 152-153; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971370

Chris Ofili
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 141-141; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971440

James Jabar
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 18-19; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851170

M. L. Krishnan
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 23-24; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851212

Ayesha Shibli
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 3-3; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851072

Lucian Mattison
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 21-22; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851198

Jessica Hincapie
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 12-14; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851128

Steve McQueen
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 162-162; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971496

Wangechi Mutu
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 146-147; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971482

Ibrahim Mahama
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 163-165; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971524

Naomi Beckwith
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 160-161; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971510

Abdellah Karroum
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art, Volume 2021, pp 158-158; doi:10.1215/10757163-8971552

Isaac Esposto
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 15-15; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851142

Matt Mitchell
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 29-29; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851254

Jackie Braje
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 55-55; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851506

Hannah V. Warren
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 47-47; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851422

Margret Grebowicz
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 56-68; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851520

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Lynn Arner
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 101-134; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851562

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jackie Braje
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 54-54; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851492

Helene Achanzar
the minnesota review, Volume 2021, pp 2-2; doi:10.1215/00265667-8851058

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