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Wylegała
The Slavonic and East European Review, Volume 99; https://doi.org/10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.99.2.0256

Abstract:
The article attempts to present the memory of the expropriation of the gentry that was carried out in the Polish countryside by the Communist authorities in 1944-45 as part of the agrarian reform, and the current approach of the countryside toward the legacy of landowners. The article presents two case studies of neighbouring villages on the border of the historical Kielce and Krakow regions: Pławowice and Paśmiechy. It draws on memories from the period under research and presently-conducted field studies to investigate the memory of landowners and their expropriation and, to a lesser extent, the division of land and social transformations that followed. The analysis then focuses on the inclusion (or exclusion) of the memory of the past associated with landowners into local group identity-building, and the relationship between biographical and collective memory, as well as the behaviour of mnemonic actors.
Marini
The Modern Language Review, Volume 116; https://doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.116.2.0281

Abstract:
Accattone, Pier Paolo Pasolini's first film, focuses on a marginal microcosm represented in all its desperation, yet also transfigured by the high forms of religious, scriptural, and figurative traditions. The cornerstone of Pasolini's project is his work with the actor. This article focuses on the character Balilla (Mario Cipriani), in whom Pasolini's figurative project is clearly visible, through the composite medium of the image and the diegetic function and cultural references that Balilla's words and gestures recall. The scriptural allusions reveal a conscious project of investiture in relation to the character, transforming him into the bearer of a universal message.
González
The Modern Language Review, Volume 116; https://doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.116.2.0295

Abstract:
Fernando de Rojas's masterpiece, La Celestina, is indebted to the medical treatises that circulated widely in fifteenth-century Iberia. Celestina scholarship has aptly traced Calisto and Melibea's lovesickness (amor hereos) to the epistemology that dealt with this life-threatening condition. These scholars, however, have not gone beyond commenting on and analysing the ways in which lovesickness affected the star-crossed lovers. This study shows that Melibea suffers from other melancholic illnesses, which predispose her to amor hereos, while the latter evolves into more virulent forms of melancholy.
Schmid
The Modern Language Review, Volume 116; https://doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.116.3.0428

Abstract:
This article examines the visualization and function of Baroque architecture, notably the works of Francesco Borromini, in Eugène Green's La Sapienza (2014). Reading the film in tandem with Green's essays on cinema and Baroque art, it analyses the film-maker's harnessing of architecture as a means to elucidate questions that are central to his philosophical enquiry: the tension between rational and spiritual forms of experience, the invisible realm behind appearances, and the mystery of salvation. I argue that La Sapienza develops a complex analogy between architecture and cinema, crystallizing Green's aesthetic philosophy as part of a wider interrogation of intermedial influence.
Morgan
The Modern Language Review, Volume 116; https://doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.116.3.0408

Abstract:
The late fourteenth- or early fifteenth-century manuscript of the French prose romance Conte du papegau is an unicum, its origins and intended audience unknown. Literary critics generally dismiss it as a late Arthurian creation. It recounts the youth of King Arthur, who is accompanied by a trophy, namely a parrot that repeats aloud his adventures, which are patterned on several of Chrétien de Troyes's romances. Those elements, together with historical and artistic references to parrots, suggest a limited courtly audience for the tale, both lay and clerical: families in French and Italian international papal circles.
Berecz
The Slavonic and East European Review, Volume 99; https://doi.org/10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.99.1.0001

Abstract:
The article investigates patterns of written language choice in majority Romanian and German rural local governments in the eastern third of Dualist Hungary. In spite of the recognition that the Nationalities Act of 1868 accorded to the citizenry's linguistic diversity, the political establishment soon embarked on typical nation-state linguistic policies. It failed, however, to make new generations learn Hungarian. The central government promoted the use of Hungarian by incentivizing village secretaries, the only career bureaucrats in local governments. The article brings to the fore the tension between the push of a Hungarian-only ideology and the rapid spread of mother-tongue literacy.
Dickins
The Slavonic and East European Review, Volume 99; https://doi.org/10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.99.2.0201

Abstract:
This article addresses a phenomenon that has been downplayed (especially in publications aimed at non-Czech speakers) — anti-establishment language humour and creativity in the Czech-speaking lands from 1938 to 1989. The study begins with a discussion of the motivation behind the humour and wordplay, with particular reference to their linguistic and comedic functions. This is followed by an examination of the principal themes and targets of the humour, or its message(s). A distinction is drawn here between anti-German humour, which sought to defend Czech identity, and humour critical of Communism, which was aimed mainly at political reform. In the final and longest section, the focus switches to the medium of the humour, which is analysed in detail under two defining headings: metalinguistic playfulness, and intertextual and encoded referents. In conclusion, the article stresses, inter alia, the symbolic importance of the anti-regime humour as a means of subversion, and the pleasure and solace that people took from it, both as a form of escapism and as an aesthetic experience.
Schøllhammer
Portuguese Studies, Volume 37; https://doi.org/10.5699/portstudies.37.1.0075

Abstract:
This article will argue that the irruption of the present economic and political crises reveals a challenge to a certain optimism that enveloped the discourse of the contemporary since the beginning of the century. Through the readings of a small selection of novels from 2018 and 2019, by the writers Joca Reiners Terron, Chico Buarque de Holanda, Ana Paula Maia, Itamar Vieira Junior, Luiz Ruffato and Milton Hatoum, we will analyse divergent historical perspectives revealed by these narratives as implicit or explicit intervention into the present authoritarian brutalization of the national self-fashioning. In Essa Gente, the author’s ambition aims to dive into the ‘presence of the present’ in a hallucinatory simultaneity with political occurrences; Torto Arado by Itamar Vieira Junior offers another dimension of the anachronical actuality of the traumatic past of slavery; while Verão Tardio by Luiz Ruffato dives into the melancholic return of the main character to a past he cannot get rid of. In Joca Reiners Terron’s A Morte e o Meteoro and in Enterrem seus Mortos by Ana Paula Maia the retrofuturistic narratives expose the ongoing extermination of indigenous cultures in the Amazon region and the latency of the anthropocene through human interaction with animal nature.
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