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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.cjog.1001110)
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Jain Namita, Malik Sonia, Prakash Ved
Clinical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 5, pp 067-071; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.cjog.1001110

Abstract:
Introduction: PCOS is a common cause of female infertility. Although PCOS patients are characterized by producing an increased number of oocytes, they are often of poor quality, leading to lower fertilization, cleavage, and implantation and higher miscarriage rates. Aims: The present study aims to identify the effect of various PCOS phenotypes on oocyte competence in an ART cycle. Settings and design: A retrospective observational study. Methods and material: The study group included 102 women with PCOS as a main cause of infertility. Data was collected over a period of one year (2017-18). These women were divided into four groups on basis of PCOS phenotypes (A-D) and the relevant clinical data and the ART outcome were noted. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS statistical package. Data presented as mean ± SD which was compared using the ANOVA test. A p - value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 102 PCOS women, 23.52% women had phenotype A, 11.76% had phenotype B, and 45.09% and 19.60% had phenotype C & D respectively. Good quality embryos formed (p - value 0.01) were lower in Group B vs. other groups. However, clinical pregnancy rates were comparable in all groups. Conclusion: The reproductive potential of women with PCOS varies with the oocyte health and it largely depends on PCOS phenotype. Women with PCOS phenotype B might have poor IVF/ICSI outcomes with regard to the number of oocytes retrieved and embryos formed. PCO morphology might carry an advantage with regards to the number of oocytes retrieved and better quality embryos. It seems that hyperandrogenism in combination with chronic anovulation is associated with poor oocyte competence and hence, a negative impact on embryo quality and clinical pregnancy rate. Further studies with a larger sample size are required to further support it. Key messages: Oocyte competence in various PCOS phenotypes.
María Andrea Quintero-Ortíz, , Jairo Amaya-Guio
Revista Brasileira de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia / RBGO Gynecology and Obstetrics, Volume 43, pp 627-637; https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1733999

Abstract:
Objective To compare the effects of expectant versus interventionist care in the management of pregnant women with severe preeclampsia remote from term. Data sources An electronic search was conducted in the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS, for its Spanish acronym), World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO-ICTRP), and OpenGrey databases. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO, for its French acronym), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and Colombian Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (CJOG) websites were searched for conference proceedings, without language restrictions, up to March 25, 2020. Selection of studies Randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and non-randomized controlled studies (NRSs) were included. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to evaluate the quality of the evidence. Data collection Studies were independently assessed for inclusion criteria, data extraction, and risk of bias. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Data synthesis Four RCTs and six NRS were included. Low-quality evidence from the RCTs showed that expectant care may result in a lower incidence of appearance, pulse, grimace, activity, and respiration (Apgar) scores < 7 at 5 minutes (risk ratio [RR]: 0.48; 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 0.23%to 0.99) and a higher average birth weight (mean difference [MD]: 254.7 g; 95%CI: 98.5 g to 410.9 g). Very low quality evidence from the NRSs suggested that expectant care might decrease the rates of neonatal death (RR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.22 to 0.80), hyaline membrane disease (RR: 0.59; 95%CI: 0.40 to 0.87), and admission to neonatal care (RR: 0.73; 95%CI: 0.54 to 0.99). No maternal or fetal differences were found for other perinatal outcomes. Conclusion Compared with interventionist management, expectant care may improve neonatal outcomes without increasing maternal morbidity and mortality.
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