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, Xu Liu, , Youwei Wang
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Volume 62, pp 643-653; https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21487

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Volume 53, pp 1113-1119; https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.10153

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Science & Technology Libraries, Volume 35, pp 304-312; https://doi.org/10.1080/0194262x.2016.1217813

Abstract:
For eighty years, food safety scientists have analyzed and validated each other’s work on microbiological contamination, spoilage, and poisonings using subscription-based journals well known for their scientific integrity. Now, however, more and more funders encourage researchers to publish in open access (OA) journals and allow paying Article Processing Charges (APCs) from grants. This article determined the degree to which purely OA publishers have gained in market share of scholarly food safety papers since the 1999–2000 foundings of the highly reputable BMC (BioMed Central) and PLOS (Public Library of Science) families of journals and the rise of many other OA publishers in the interim, including some that are controversial. Even now only 10 percent of papers on the most important foodborne pathogens appear in OA sources. Food safety scientists who might eventually be required to publish on an OA basis would best reach their target audience and minimize reputational risk by exercising any available option to pay APCs for their manuscripts to appear on an OA basis in the otherwise subscription-based most-trusted journals of their profession.
Jane L. Chapman, Nick Nuttall
Published: 5 April 2011
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Serena Miller
Published: 26 March 2019
Abstract:
The emergence of citizen journalism has prompted the journalism field and scholars to readdress what constitutes journalism and who is a journalist. Citizen journalists have disrupted news-media ecosystems by challenging the veracity and representativeness of information flowing from mainstream news-media newsrooms. However, the controversy related to the desired level of citizen involvement in the news process is a historical debate that began before the citizen-journalism phenomenon. As early as the 1920s, journalist and political commentator Walter Lippman and American philosopher John Dewey debated the role of journalism in democracy, including the extent that the public should participate in the news-gathering and production processes. This questioning of citizen involvement in news reemerged as an issue with the citizen journalism phenomenon around the late 1990s. People with no news-media organizational ties have taken advantage of the convenience and low cost of social computing technologies by publishing their own stories and content. These people are referred to as citizen journalists. Scholars have assessed the quality and credibility of citizen-journalism content, finding that citizen journalists have performed well on several standards of traditional news-content quality. Levels of quality differ dependent upon citizen journalists’ goals and motivations, such as serving the public interest, increasing self-status, or expressing their creative selves. As it is an emerging area of study, unarticulated theoretical boundaries of citizen journalism exist. Citizen-journalism publications emphasize community over conflict, advocacy over objectivity, and interpretation over fact-based reporting. In general, citizen journalists have historically acted when existing news-media journalists were not fully meeting their community’s informational needs. Scholars, however, vary in how they label citizen journalists and how they conceptually and empirically define citizen journalism. For example, researchers have shifted their definitional focus on citizen journalists from one of active agents of democratic change to people who create a piece of news content. The mapping of the citizen-journalism literature revealed four types of citizen journalists based on their levels of editorial control and contribution type: (1) participatory, (2) para, (3) news-media watchdog, and (4) community. Taken together, these concepts describe the breadth of citizen-journalist types. For those of us interested in journalism studies, a more targeted approach in the field of citizen journalism can help us build community around scholarship, understand citizen journalists’ contributions to society and practice, and create a more a stable foundation of knowledge concerning people who create and comment on news content.
Aaron Quinn
Published: 1 January 2018
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Stephen J. A. Ward
Published: 15 April 2011
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, Volume 71, pp 470-486; https://doi.org/10.1177/1077695815593984

Abstract:
Teachers of business and economic journalism are developing creative approaches to attracting students and educating them in a field many find daunting. To recruit, some avoid using the terms business or economic in course titles, preferring financial basics and financial literacy. Many use novel classroom techniques: to educate students about stock markets, for instance, some set up competitions where students vie to develop the most profitable portfolio. Provocative videos, cleverly developed assignments and trips to business-news sites are highlights in some courses. This article reviews approaches by a broad array of teachers.
Christopher Meyers
Published: 18 June 2015
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Dan Lasserson
Published: 16 November 2009
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 April 2006
Journalism Studies, Volume 7, pp 212-236; https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700500533528

Abstract:
This paper examines the new forms of audience participation in journalism with regard to their possibility in achieving the goals of public journalism.2 2. The term “public journalism” is used here to encompass also civic journalism, as the two terms are often used interchangeably. View all notes A typology of five models of audience connections is proposed: (1) traditional journalism, (2) public journalism, (3) interactive journalism, (4) participatory journalism, and (5) citizen journalism. Identifying the higher goal of public journalism as engaging the people as citizens and helping public deliberation, I argue that the new forms of audience participation could further these goals only by infusing the value from and learning the techniques of public journalism. The concept of community, of public deliberation, past research on the Internet, and data obtained from my field study is drawn upon.
Published: 12 January 2018
Journalism Practice, Volume 13, pp 349-366; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2018.1463167

Abstract:
This paper explores data journalism education, with a particular focus on formal training in the higher education sector globally. The study draws on data from: (1) the 2017 Global Data Journalism Survey, to study the state of data journalism education and the requirements in terms of training and (2) a dataset of 219 unique modules or programmes on data journalism or related fields that were curated and examined in order to understand the nature of data journalism education in universities across the world. The results show that while journalists interested in data are highly educated in journalism or closely related fields, they do not have a strong level of education in the more technical areas of data journalism, such as data analysis, coding and data visualisation. The study further reveals that a high proportion of data journalism courses are concentrated in the United States, with a growing number of courses developing across the world, and particularly in Europe. Despite this, education in the field does not have a strong academic underpinning, and while many courses are emerging in this area, there are not enough academically trained instructors to lead and/or teach such interdisciplinary programmes in the higher education sector.
Pacific Journalism Review, Volume 22; https://doi.org/10.24135/pjr.v22i1.19

Abstract:
France detonated 193 of a total of 210 nuclear tests in the South Pacific, at Moruroa and Fangataufa atolls, before halting them in 1996 in the face of Pacific-wide protests. On 10 July 1985, French secret agents bombed the Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior in Auckland Harbour, killing photographer Fernando Pereira, in a futile bid to stop a protest flotilla going to Moruroa. The author was on board the Rainbow Warrior for more than 10 weeks of her last voyage. He was awarded the 1985 New Zealand Media Peace Prize for reportage and investigations into the ‘Rainbow Warrior and Rongelap Evacuation’. The following year, the author’s book Eyes of Fire told the inside story of state terrorism in the Pacific. He has subsequently reflected on a 20-year legal struggle by Television New Zealand and other media campaigners to prevent the French spies gagging reportage of their guilty plea from a public video record and the lingering secrecy about the health legacy of nuclear tests in the Pacific. In the context of the Frontlineproject for journalism as research, his work inspired a microsite—a community-driven collaborative project in 2015 coordinated by the publishers, Little Island Press, interrogating participants over a three-decade period and ‘challenging the nature of mainstream media in New Zealand’ with an alternative reader’s media model.
David Paul Nord
Published: 10 January 2012
A Companion to Benjamin Franklin pp 290-307; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444342154.ch15

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Jason Sternberg
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, Volume 77, pp 157-176; https://doi.org/10.1177/10776958211032856

Abstract:
What skills, attributes, and experiences are needed for a visual journalism job in a contemporary print and digital newsroom? Previous attempts at answering this question examine it through insights from hiring managers or news editors, often collected retrospectively or at arbitrary times of the year through surveys; analyses of position descriptions, which are often framed in normative terms; or through analyzing journalism curricula, which perpetually struggle to adapt nimbly to evolving industry demands. This signaling theory study adopts a novel approach by examining, through qualitative thematic analysis, all applicants’ resumes and cover letters submitted by candidates for a visual journalism job posted in 2019. The hiring organization sought a candidate who could not only tell newsworthy stories through images but also one who could “write their own stories,” “have strong organizational skills,” and be “knowledgeable about current digital technology and applications for smartphone photography.” The results provide insight into the types of applicants who apply to such a position; the skills, attributes, and experiences employers regard as worthy of shortlisting; and the strategies candidates adopted in addressing the position description and selection criteria.
Published: 17 December 2021
Journalism Practice, Volume 16, pp 502-519; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.2008811

Abstract:
Journalists have traditionally had the power to choose which news stories to tell and which not to tell. This “gatekeeping” power was not won by journalists in a contest with others, or imposed on audiences, but was instead the unavoidable consequence of structural constraints in the production, distribution, and consumption of news in the pre-digital environment. This article examines this structural selectivity in journalism, identifies the kinds of news stories that may be more difficult to tell selectively and questions whether the structural constraints that require selectivity are still relevant in the digital news ecosystem. A systematic alternative to selective journalism, in which every story within a domain is covered in the same way, is described. Several examples of systematic journalism implemented in newsrooms in the US and UK are provided, and the public service motivations for their systematic coverage is emphasised. Systematic journalism is positioned as fundamentally, not incrementally, different from selective journalism in its characteristics and outcomes, and some of those characteristics are reviewed. A description of systematic journalism as it might be applied to climate change news stories is then developed. Finally, some of the broader challenges and implications of systematic forms of journalism are discussed.
David Caswell, C. W. Anderson
Published: 29 April 2019
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Chang E. Koh
Published: 30 September 2003
Information & Management, Volume 40, pp 743-756; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0378-7206(02)00100-3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 18 August 2021
Journalism Studies, Volume 22, pp 1400-1415; https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670x.2021.1951617

Abstract:
This paper explores the impact of specific social and cultural contexts on understanding and initiating innovation in investigative journalism training and practice in the Arab world. Historically, Arab journalism practice and training has taken on a Western model of operation as it is regarded as an ideal model of journalism practice in the region, however, this is slowly changing to suit an Arab media ecology. Today, in a digital journalism environment, there is still no efficient culturally appropriate model for Arab journalists to work in. Through an observation analysis of training sessions and interviews with Arab investigative reporters in 2013 and 2019, this paper will address the challenges facing the development of an Arab culture of investigative journalism, whilst also discussing the innovative methods Arab journalists are experimenting with in light of these challenges.
E. Susanna Cahn, Victor Glass
Published: 1 September 2018
SSRN Electronic Journal; https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3662607

Abstract:
Business ethics journals have appeared on a few ranked lists that are specific to this niche discipline. As with more traditional academic disciplines, these rankings are used for academic rewards such as faculty tenure and promotion, along with department and school ratings. Journal ranking has been subject to considerable criticism even as its administrative use persists. Among the criticisms are that journal quality is a poor proxy for article quality, citation rate is an imperfect reflection of article influence, and bias may be introduced into rankings by visibility characteristics such as journal age, size, circulation, and experience of the rater with a journal. This research note studies the effect of journal age and size on the rankings of business ethics journals compiled by Beets, Lewis, and Brower, by Albrecht, Thompson, Hoopes, and Rodrigo, and by Serenko and Bontis. Significant correlation was found for journal age with the administratively derived Beets et al. ranking. No significant correlation was found for size in any ranking study. Results were not significant for the Albrecht et al. and the Serenko and Bontis rankings representing the perspectives from surveys of active researchers or citation analysis. Perhaps sometimes a journals reputation precedes it, as perception of journal quality may be biased by journal visibility, either because it has been published and available for a number of years, or because it is well known and likely to be cited.
Brian Chama
Published: 3 April 2017
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Daya Kishan Thussu
Pacific Journalism Review, Volume 20; https://doi.org/10.24135/pjr.v20i2.176

Abstract:
Review of: Don’t Spoil My Beautiful Face: Media, Mayhem and Human Rights in the Pacific, by David Robie. Foreword by Kalafi Moala. Auckland: Little Island Press in association with the Pacific Media Centre. 2014, 362 pp. ISBN 978-1877484-25-4Most journalists work to earn a decent living. Some join the profession to rub shoulders with the rich and famous, benefitting from close proximity to the powers that be. David Robie, the doyen of journalism in the South Pacific region, has pursued a different type of journalism, as this book attests. An exceptional individual, apart from being an award-winning journalist, a prolific author and a committed journalism educator, Robie has set new standards of journalism practice and politics in a part of the globe which receives scant coverage in the international media. During the early 1990s, as associate editor of the London-based and now defunct Gemini News Service, a ‘Third World-oriented’ news features service, this reviewer had the privilege to work with Robie, who regularly contributed thoughtful, well-researched but never preachy articles and commentaries from the South Pacific region, which were circulated among the agency’s more than 100 newspapers around the world.
Published: 25 November 2015
Digital Journalism, Volume 4, pp 547-562; https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2015.1111768

Abstract:
Journalism does not get much slower than National Geographic’s Out of Eden Walk, a seven-year, around-the-world journey being undertaken by two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Paul Salopek. This article explains how Salopek’s Walk is a particularly useful and beautiful example of slow journalism that renders the oldest story in human history using innovative digital tools of the twenty-first century. It also offers university educators ideas on using the Out of Eden Walk as a teaching tool, by exposing classrooms to the literary and visual delights of the project while having students design and implement a narrative walk of their own.
Farooq A. Kperogi
The Handbook of Global Online Journalism pp 445-461; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118313978.ch24

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Deni Elliott, Amanda Decker
Published: 15 April 2011
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 13 August 2021
by MDPI
Journalism and Media, Volume 2, pp 484-498; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia2030029

Abstract:
Survey evidence shows a deontological ethical ideology remains dominant in global journalism, underpinned by a cultural value of detachment. This article opens by considering the strain imposed on these precepts in US corporate media while covering the Trump White House—ultimately to breaking point with the defeated president’s campaign to overturn the result, attempting to co-opt news organisations in the process. Feedback loops of cause and effect have, in any case, been exposed in today’s extended media, making the involvement of journalism in stories—through influence on audience responses and source behaviours—impossible to overlook. At the same time, new journalisms are emerging and growing, which adhere instead to a teleological ethical ideology. They openly identify themselves with external goals, and appeal for funds from donors and supporters on that basis. The article then goes on to present original data from analysing statements of aims and purpose put out by 12 news organisations working in four of these new fields: Peace Journalism; Solutions Journalism; Engaged, or Participatory Journalism; and Investigative Journalism, respectively. These represent a growing edge in journalism, it is argued, since they are positioned to respond positively to the changed conditions brought about by political and technological forces, which were illustrated by the Trump crisis. The study points to the changes in institutional arrangements now needed, if the structural foundations for their survival and success are to be strengthened.
, María Claudia Nieto-Cruz
PROFILE Issues in Teachers' Professional Development, Volume 23, pp 9-14; https://doi.org/10.15446/profile.v23n2.96647

Abstract:
In the 2020 report of the SJR (published in May 2021), the Profile journal moved from Quartile 2 to Quartile 1 in the category of linguistics and language. Within this area the journal is now Number 229 of the 997 journals classified worldwide, Number 2 in Latin America, and Number 1 in Colombia.
Mohammed El-Nawawy
International Communication Gazette, Volume 69, pp 69-90; https://doi.org/10.1177/1748048507072785

Abstract:
This study surveyed a convenience sample of journalism educators at Arab universities and journalism practitioners at daily Arab newspapers in Egypt and Jordan to determine the degree of alignment between journalism theory and practice in both countries. The researcher adapted, with some modifications, three scales by Dickson and Brandon to compare the perceptions of educators to those of practitioners regarding the importance of the following aspects for preparing journalism graduates for entry-level journalism positions: types of media-related courses, journalism competencies, practices adopted by academic journalism programs and qualifications of journalism faculty. Results showed that while educators agreed with professionals on most journalistic competencies and practices that ought to be taught by academic journalism programs in Egypt and Jordan, educators' rankings of courses on media theory, journalism skills and ICT were significantly higher than those of professionals. The study also revealed that most journalism educators and practitioners believed that there was a gap between journalism education and professionalism in Egypt and Jordan. Respondents' answers to the open-ended questions suggested some ways to bridge this gap.
Published: 1 March 2021
Journalism Studies, Volume 22, pp 454-474; https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670x.2021.1882876

Abstract:
Journalism pioneers practice and foster the method of cross-border collaboration, contributing to the ongoing transformation of the journalistic field. This paper analyzes cross-border journalistic collaborations primarily initiated beyond large media organizations. Based on information provided by Hostwriter members and Dataharvest – the EIJC participants, this study carves out (1) central motives, (2) types and characteristics of cross-border research collaborations, and (3) the advantages and challenges of the method as perceived by practitioners “from below.” We argue that bottom-up collaborations contribute to a normalization of the practice through small-scale, less institutionalized, and less binding forms that enable a gradual transition towards a new mindset in the broader field. The above pioneering platforms foster a developing network of open-minded and multicultural practitioners.
Ann Auman, Susan Stos, Elizabeth Burch
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, Volume 75, pp 9-15; https://doi.org/10.1177/1077695820901941

Abstract:
Following ethical standards is more critical than ever in a digital world where media reaches global, fragmented audiences. But each country, culture, and situation is different. So, how do we decide what standards are important to teach? Syndicate participants identified issues that instructors need to address to answer this question. This report represents areas of agreement as well as differences on teaching ethics without borders in a digital age.
Tanja Aitamurto
Published: 26 April 2019
Abstract:
Advances in digital technologies and participatory culture have enabled the efficient use of crowdsourcing in a broad range of contexts, including journalism. Journalism is increasingly deploying crowdsourcing as a knowledge-search method and a means of engaging readers. Through crowdsourcing, journalists can tap into the collective intelligence of large online crowds. The knowledge-search mechanism is based on access to the information held by the crowd. Using crowdsourcing, journalists can find otherwise inaccessible information that contributes to their investigations. In several countries, crowdsourced investigations have uncovered important news, including lawbreaking and corruption. Crowdsourcing can also unveil a broader range of perspectives about a story topic, leading to more inclusive and objective journalism. As a result, crowdsourcing can support the journalistic norms of accurate, objective, and transparent reporting. Moreover, it engages participants and fosters a stronger relationship between readers and journalists. Finally, in its use of crowdsourcing journalism can enact more efficiently in its monitorial role in society. At the same time, however, crowdsourcing may compromise the journalistic goals of accuracy and objectivity. A crowd is a self-selected group, so its input reflects a participant bias. If this fact is overlooked, crowdsourcing can lead to biased reporting. Moreover, a direct connection with the crowd can increase pressure on journalists to conform to the crowd’s wishes instead of pursuing journalistic norms and news values. This pressure can be especially strong in crowdfunding, a subtype of crowdsourcing.
Mark Poepsel
The International Encyclopedia of Journalism Studies pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118841570.iejs0120

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of Neurosurgery, Volume 130, pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.9.jns182570

Abstract:
With this landmark issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery (JNS), we celebrate the 75th anniversary of continuous publication of articles in neurosurgery. It is likely not a coincidence that the diamond anniversary of the JNS coincides precisely with the 150th anniversary of the birth of Harvey Cushing. It is possible that some events in life are inextricably and cosmically tied together, such as the birth of the founding father of our specialty, the society named after him that ultimately became the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), and the journal of this organization—the JNS.
Fayaz Ahmad Loan, Asmat Ali
Published: 6 June 2015
SSRN Electronic Journal; https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3135251

Abstract:
The main purpose of the paper is to study the publishing trends of the open access business and economics journals available in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). The online survey was conducted for collection of data and quantitative method was applied for data analysis. The data were collected from the December 10-20, 2013 about more than six hundred business and economic journals and later presented in tabular forms to reveal the findings in accordance with desired objectives. The findings show that 607 business and economics journals are listed in the DOAJ and are published from the 67 countries of the world. The maximum number of journals (88, 14.50%) is published from Brazil, and during the first decade (2001-2010) of the 21st century (382, 62.93%). The linguistic assessment shows that the open access business and economics journals are mostly monolingual (405, 66.72%) and the majority of these are published in English language (498, 82.04%). The results also reveal that the majority of the business and economics journals (415, 68.37%) doesn’t charge publication fees to authors whereas almost one-fourth (147, 24.22%) of the journals demand article processing charges. The study does not explore the whole World Wide Web, but only the DOAJ and therefore, figures do not represent the actual number of the open access business and economics journals available online. The study is very beneficial for the business and economics scientists, academicians, researchers, information experts and open access advocates across the globe.
W. Michael Brown
Published: 1 November 1988
NASSP Bulletin, Volume 72, pp 27-29; https://doi.org/10.1177/019263658807251109

Abstract:
A qualified teacher is the key to a sound journalism program, and here's what the Journalism Education Association is doing to increase the numbers of such teachers.
Published: 2 February 2017
Digital Journalism, Volume 5, pp 1240-1259; https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2017.1289819

Abstract:
The availability of data feeds, the demand for news on digital devices, and advances in algorithms are helping to make automated journalism more prevalent. This article extends the literature on the subject by analysing professional journalists’ experiences with, and opinions about, the technology. Uniquely, the participants were drawn from a range of news organizations—including the BBC, CNN, and Thomson Reuters—and had first-hand experience working with robo-writing software provided by one of the leading technology suppliers. The results reveal journalists’ judgements on the limitations of automation, including the nature of its sources and the sensitivity of its “nose for news”. Nonetheless, journalists believe that automated journalism will become more common, increasing the depth, breadth, specificity, and immediacy of information available. While some news organizations and consumers may benefit, such changes raise ethical and societal issues and, counter-intuitively perhaps, may increase the need for skills—news judgement, curiosity, and scepticism—that human journalists embody.
Giles Dodson
Pacific Journalism Review, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.24135/pjr.v18i2.282

Abstract:
Review of: Journalism across cultures: An introduction, by Levi Obijiofor and Folker Hanusch. London: Palgrave Macmillan. 2011, 236 pp., ISBN 978023023609 (pbk). Journalism across cultures offers an excellent introduction for students and instructors seeking to broaden their view of international journalism practices and issues. As the authors suggest, the increasing interdependence and interconnection of our world demands a global perspective when assessing the changing dynamics of news journalism. Nonetheless, as this volume makes clear, notwithstanding the emergence of global media forms and practices, comparative journalism studies draws our attention to the ongoing contingencies of culture politics and history that continue to shape journalism around the globe.
Communication Research and Practice, Volume 2, pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1080/22041451.2016.1259973

Abstract:
This article argues that, despite scepticism and many obstacles, a global media ethics can be realised to a significant degree. It can become a much needed and influential guide for responsible journalism in a global media world. After defining the term ‘global media ethics’, the paper provides a conception of the goals and structure of a plausible global media ethic. It concludes on a practical note, proposing a number of ways in which the project of global media ethics can be advanced so as to become a dominant approach to media ethics.
Stefanie Kuballa, Mareike Schulze, Claudia Böhm, Olaf Gefeller, Jan Haaf, Peter Henning, Corinna Mielke, Florian Niggemann, Andrea Schürg, Dieter Bergemann, et al.
Methods of Information in Medicine, Volume 55, pp 481-487; https://doi.org/10.3414/me16-05-0010

Abstract:
Summary Background: Based on today‘s information and communication technologies the open access paradigm has become an important approach for adequately communicating new scientific knowledge. Objectives: Summarizing the present situa -tion for journal transformation. Presenting criteria for adequate transformation as well as a specific approach for it. Describing our exemplary implementation of such a journal transformation. Methods: Studying the respective literature as well as discussing this topic in various discussion groups and meetings (primarily of editors and publishers, but also of authors and readers), with long term experience as editors and /or publishers of scientific publications as prerequisite. Results: There is a clear will, particularly of political and funding organizations, towards open access publishing. In spite of this, there is still a large amount of scientific knowl edge, being communicated through subscription-based journals. For successfully transforming such journals into open access, sixteen criteria for a goal-oriented, stepwise, sustainable, and fair transformation are suggested. The Tandem Model as transformation approach is introduced. Our exemplary implementation is done in the Trans-O-MIM project. It is exploring strategies, models and evaluation metrics for journal transforma tion. As instance the journal Methods of Information in Medicine will apply the Tandem Model from 2017 onwards. Conclusions: Within Trans-O-MIM we will reach at least nine of the sixteen criteria for adequate transformation. It was positive to implement Trans-O-MIM as international research project. After first steps for transforming Methods have successfully been made, challenges will remain, among others, in identifying appropriate incentives for open access publishing in order to support its transformation.
Raymond R. Ferreira, Agnes L. DeFranco, Clinton L. Rappole
International Journal of Hospitality Management, Volume 13, pp 209-218; https://doi.org/10.1016/0278-4319(94)90021-3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Tanni Haas, Linda Steiner
Published: 1 January 2002
Journalism Studies, Volume 3, pp 325-341; https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700220145579

Abstract:
This article examines almost a decade of reporting on public journalism published in the two largest and most widely read US journalism reviews: Columbia Journalism Review and American Journalism Review . It argues that instead of examining its historical underpinnings, theoretical claims, and practical manifestations, these two publications treated public journalism at best as just another manifestation of the increasing profit orientation of news media. At worst, it was scapegoated for the failings of all news organizations, including pandering to local communities and other practices that put immediate market interests ahead of democratic processes. While this description finds little support in the empirical research literature on public journalism, it may reflect mainstream journalists' increasing fears of a corporate colonization of journalism. Critics used the introduction of public journalism into newsrooms as an opportunity to express anxiety about how extra-journalistic (primarily economic) forces are encroaching upon journalists' professional autonomy and undermining the quality of news coverage.
Published: 3 February 2022
Journalism Studies, Volume 23, pp 487-505; https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670x.2022.2032803

Abstract:
This article argues that the logic of data journalism has been a driving force in journalism since its beginnings, particularly in the case of economic journalism. Economic journalism has historically integrated five central aspects of data journalism: working with data and databases; the development of a conceptual infrastructure for data analysis and storytelling; the regular use of visualization tools; the application of new technologies to the peculiarities of economic data; and the integration of different professional profiles in the newsrooms. By analyzing economic journalism - the first among equals of data journalism - the article argues that data journalism can extract some lessons from economic news in order to improve the extension of data stories to every news beat. Four recommendations are drawn: the importance of a balanced management of data exuberance, their newsworthiness, and the analytical and conceptual tools used to interpret them; the aim of visualization should be more conceptual than descriptive, in order to simplify and clarify complex issues, and relationships between data, to make the explanation of current affairs more relevant and understandable; data journalism needs a harmonious integration of investigative projects with day-to-day coverage; and data journalism should avoid the perils of technological determinism.
Maurine Beasley
Published: 1 May 2001
Journalism Studies, Volume 2, pp 207-220; https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700120042088

Abstract:
This article reviews recent work that deals with the experience of women in American journalism. It concludes that this work points in the direction of a new synthesis telling a more comprehensive story of women and journalism as an alternative to the present narrative that details women's efforts to succeed professionally by conforming to a male model of journalistic performance. To fully arrive at this synthesis, the article contends, a new definition of journalism itself is needed-one broad enough to encompass women like Eleanor Roosevelt, who used journalism for political and personal ends not related to the professional norm of objectivity. In calling for a redefinition of journalism to include women's perspectives, the article advocates more use of family-oriented social history and biography as well as more study of women's networking in journalism and women's personal experience recorded in oral histories.
Roman Rusch, Erk Simon, , Detlef Flintz
Published: 23 March 2021
Journalism Practice pp 1-21; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.1901599

Abstract:
Hitherto no study has investigated the impact of constructive television journalism on affections and cognition of adult viewers. Having conducted a quasi-experimental online survey in cooperation with West German Broadcasting Corporation (WDR), this paper attempts to close this gap. To measure the impact a sample of 480 people were exposed to three differently emotionalizing news topics. For each of them, three item variations were created. They consist of an individual solution, a meta-solution, and no solution. The study shows that constructive TV-pieces have a positive emotional effect on viewers. This finding is particularly pronounced for news items with an individual solution. The comparison of the results for item variations with a meta-solution or no solution did not yield conclusive evidence. Negative emotions are reduced in news items that contain individual or meta-solutions. This effect is weaker for the latter when compared to news items without solutions.
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