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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.apmh.1001027)
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Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 001-003; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001027

Abstract:
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had affected both developed and developing countries too. The first case in Nepal was confirmed on 23 January 2020. It was also the first recorded case of COVID-19 in South Asia. Nepal reported its first COVID-19 death on May 16. At the end of October, the number of death stood 937 and 1126 on 9 November. In September and October, deaths doubled, and with winter setting in, fatalities may skyrocket. Among the total CP cases in Nepal nearly 50% are from the Capital Kathmandu. So, Kathmandy is the new epicenter of COVID-19 in Nepal. There are no proper community-based isolation centres and ICU beds are also still limited. Due to increasing trend of COVID-19 cases and death people have fear of psychological stress. A study shows at least one symptom of psychological distress whereas 32% suffered from two or more symptoms of psychological distress such as restlessness, fearfulness, anxiety and worry and sadness. Despite limited resources, the government’s major challenges are early diagnosis, management of confirmed cases, contact tracing, and implementing some public health measures to reduce the infection’s transmissibility.
, Andrea McIlvena
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, Volume 53, pp 17-21; https://doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20150622-03

Abstract:
Aging Matters Paul Sadler, MAPS, CCLP; Andrea McIlvena, RN, CMHN Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) programs are an integral part of Aged Persons Mental Health Services (APMHS); however, no study has investigated whether a rural-based intensive program benefits older clients with severe mental illness. The current sample comprised 119 older adults who were being managed by a CAIR program from July 2011 to June 2013. Three key results were found: (a) approximately three quarters of clients admitted to the CAIR program remained treated in the community; (b) the program assisted in significantly reducing the level of psychiatric symptom severity from CAIR entry to CAIR exit; and (c) the APMHS team with the CAIR program had a lower psychiatric inpatient rate compared to the APMHS team without the program. The current study highlights the importance of delivering effective rural-based CAIR programs to older adults experiencing severe mental illness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(9), 17–21.] Mr. Sadler is Clinical Psychologist, and Ms. McIlvena is Mental Health Nurse and Team Leader, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Gippsland Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia. Ms. McIlvena is the team leader of the Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) program, and Paul Sadler consults within Latrobe Regional Hospital’s Aged Persons Mental Health Service. The authors acknowledge the late Associate Professor Bruce Osborne (Psychogeriatrician) who pioneered and introduced the CAIR program to rural Victoria, Australia. The authors thank Latrobe Regional Hospital for supporting the CAIR program as well as the clients and their carers for participating. The authors also acknowledge the skill and dedication of each mental health practitioner who works in community rural aged psychiatry. Address correspondence to Paul Sadler, MAPS, CCLP, Clinical Psychologist, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Graham Street, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia, 3995; e-mail: [email protected] 10.3928/02793695-20150622-03 Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) programs are an integral part of Aged Persons Mental Health Services (APMHS); however, no study has investigated whether a rural-based intensive program benefits older clients with severe mental illness. The current sample comprised 119 older adults who were being managed by a CAIR program from July 2011 to June 2013. Three key results were found: (a) approximately three quarters of clients admitted to the CAIR program remained treated in the community; (b) the program assisted in significantly reducing the level of psychiatric symptom severity from CAIR entry to CAIR exit; and (c) the APMHS team with the CAIR program had a lower psychiatric inpatient rate compared to the APMHS team without the program. The current study highlights the importance of delivering effective rural-based CAIR programs to older adults experiencing severe mental illness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(9), 17–21.] Mr. Sadler is Clinical Psychologist, and Ms. McIlvena is Mental Health Nurse and Team Leader, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Gippsland Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia. Ms. McIlvena is the team leader of the Community Aged Intensive Recovery (CAIR) program, and Paul Sadler consults within Latrobe Regional Hospital’s Aged Persons Mental Health Service. The authors acknowledge the late Associate Professor Bruce Osborne (Psychogeriatrician) who pioneered and introduced the CAIR program to rural Victoria, Australia. The authors thank Latrobe Regional Hospital for supporting the CAIR program as well as the clients and their carers for participating. The authors also acknowledge the skill and dedication of each mental health practitioner who works in community rural aged psychiatry. Address correspondence to Paul Sadler, MAPS, CCLP, Clinical Psychologist, Latrobe Regional Hospital’s South West Aged Persons Mental Health Service, Wonthaggi Hospital, Graham Street, Wonthaggi, Victoria, Australia, 3995; e-mail: [email protected]
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