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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.acem.1001019)
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, Bryan F. Vaca-Cartagena, Andrea Becerril-Gaitan, Fernando Castilleja-Leal
Published: 28 September 2021
European Journal of Cancer, Volume 158, pp 189-190; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2021.08.051

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Melek Hacer Efnan, , Ataç Gökçe Kaan
Annals of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Volume 5, pp 014-023; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.acem.1001019

Abstract:
Introduction: Obesity defined as increased fatty mass is progressively rising in recently, even though its affects begins to all systems in childhood and adolescence periods, the most important morbidity and mortality reason of obesity is its effects on the cardiovascular system. Researches point out endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis as the reason of the cardiovascular system disease in obesity. The studies conducted on childhood period related to this subject are highly limited and the results of these are also controversial. Therefore in our study the effects of obesity on endothelial functions in children and adolescents was assessed by flow mediated dilation (FMD) method. In addition to that, effects of epidemiological, biochemical, hormonal and clinical features of cases to FMD were investigated. Material and method: A total number of 104 cases were cover in this study. Obese group (group 1) was consisted of 59 children whose body mass index (BMI) was ≥ 95th percentile and mean age was 12 ± 2.8 years old. The control group (group 2) consisted of 45 children whose body mass index (BMI) was between 25th -84th percentil and mean age was 11.4 ± 2.9 years old. The detailed history, epidemiological data and physical examination were performed. The population classified three groups according to sport activities. 97th percentile and higher values were accepted as morbid obesity. The blood pressure was measured with a mercury sphygmomanometer with utilizing the proper size cuff in compliance with the criterion used by the “National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group”. The complete blood count and biochemistry tests (renal and liver function tests, electrolytes, lipids, hsCRP) of the cases were analysed with biochemistry Roche Cobas Integra 800 and hormon assays of the cases (thyroid function tests, diurnal cortisol, ACTH, 17 OHP, prolactin, DHEA-S) were analysed by ECLIA method on Roche Elecsys 2010 device in the laboratory of our hospital. IR-HOMA values > 2.5 in prepuberal and > 4 in pubertal were defined as the insulin resistance. Bone ages of cases were evaluated with left hand wrist X-ray by using Greulich and Pyle Bone Age Atlas. flow mediated dilation (FMD) was used to assess the endothelial functions of all cases. The brachial artery was evaluated with SPG 12 MHz surface probes by using GE voluson ultrasound system in this method. FMD was expresses as percent (%) increase according to the basal vein dimension. 7% mean value was taken as the limit in the comparisons. Results: The ratio of male and female was 20/39 in group 1 and 14/31 in group 2. 32.3% of the cases in group 1 and 47.6% of the cases in group 2 were prepubertal. The waist and hip circumferences ratio of the group 1 (0.86 ± 0.05) was significantly higher than group 2 (0.80 ± 0.07). While there was no difference between groups 1 and 2 in terms of the birth weight, using duration period of vitamin D and beginning time to additional nutrition, breastfeeding duration of group 1 (10.6 ± 7.8 months) was significantly shorter than group 2 (14 ± 7.4 months). BMIs of the mothers in group 1 were statistically higher than the mothers in group 2 (27.5 ± 4.8 kg/m² and 24.3 ± 3.2 kg/m² respectively. The mean of IR-HOMA was 4 ± 2.9 in group 1 and 1.9 ± 0.8 in group 2 and there was the insulin resistance in 51% of the obese cases. The dyslipidemia was diagnosed in 38.5% of the cases in group 1. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures in group 1 (117 ± 12.2 mmHg and 73.7 ± 9.4 mmHg respectively) were significantly higher than in group 2 (107.5 ± 9.1 mmHg and 68.2 ± 7.1 mmHg respectively). Hypertension was determined in 25% of the cases included in group 1. The minimum values of FMD in groups 1 and 2 were 1.01% and 3.1% respectively. The maximum values of FMD in groups 1 and 2 were 9.7% and 15% respectively. The mean values of FMD was %5 ± 2.3 in group 1 and %8.1 ± 3.5 in group 2. Compared with group 2, group 1 demonstrated significantly impaired FMD. There was no association between FMD and the birth weight, breastfeeding duration, physical exercises in two groups. A negative correlation was found between FMD and BMI (p < 0.01, r = -0.402). The correlation was determined between FMD and BMI of the mother (p = 0.017, r = -0.305) and the presence of obese individuals in the family (p = 0.021, r =-0.413). It was found that a significant negative correlation between FMD and waist-hip circumference ratio (p = 0.003, r = -0.421). When each groups were assessed in terms of biochemical and hormonal characteristics, there was low negative correlation between FMD and uric acid level and strong negative correlation between FMD and ALT level were determined in group 1. Conclusion: In our study showed that the obesity begins in the childhood period may cause to the endothelial dysfunction. For this reason, according to our opinion, recognition prior indicators of endothelial dysfunction in early time may be helpful both to take the precautions required and to prevent cardiovascular complications in childhood and influences to the adult period. The rising sizes of the waist and hip circumferences, positive family history for obesity and obesity of the parents were determined as the most important parameters negative affecting FMD. Unlike the literature, the association between endothelial dysfunction and GGT level the indicator of the hepatosteatosis in obese children was also found as well as FMD and ALT have also a close association independent from BMI in this study. Thus, a different point of view was formed since ALT may possibly have a predictor value in the assessment of the endothelial functions and it is also found as a highlighted risk factors for the endothelial dysfunction in this study. Because of this reason, it can be recommended that when the liver function tests...
, Carolyn Naismith, Kevin White, , Janet Bray, , Chris Aldridge, Kimberley Bardsley, Jan Cameron, Dion Candelaria, et al.
Published: 7 August 2020
Heart, Lung and Circulation, Volume 29, pp 1263-1267; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2020.08.001

Abstract:
The Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) Joint Position Statement of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Nursing Councils: COVID-19 Cardiovascular Nursing Care was prepared by an expert cardiovascular nursing writing group, comprising members of the Cardiovascular Nursing Council and Interventional Nurses Council of CSANZ, originally published online at www.csanz.edu.au and subsequently in Heart, Lung and Circulation [1CSANZ Joint Position Statement of the Cardiovascular and Interventional Nursing Councils: COVID-19 Cardiovascular Nursing Care. Available at: https://www.csanz/edu/au/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/CSANZ-COVID-19-Cardiovascular-Nursing-Care-Consensus-Statement-270520.pdf. [accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar]. This Editorial is an invited executive summary of the key issues relevant to cardiovascular nursing care in Australasia during the current COVID-19 global pandemic (Table 1).1.Reduce or Minimise Transmission to Health Care Workers and to Non-Infected PatientsThe Coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) [2Zhou P. Yang X.-L. Wang X.-G. Hu B. Zhang L. Zhang W. et al.A pneumonia outbreak associated with a new coronavirus of probable bat origin.Nature. 2020; 579: 270-273Crossref PubMed Scopus (3133) Google Scholar]. Health care workers are at increased risk of infection [3Wang J. Zhou M. Liu F. Reasons for healthcare workers becoming infected with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China.J Hosp Infect. 2020; 105: 100-101Abstract Full Text Full Text PDF PubMed Scopus (83) Google Scholar,4Wu Z. McGoogan J.M. Characteristics of and important lessons from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in China: summary of a report of 72 314 cases from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.JAMA. 2020; 323: 1239-1242Crossref PubMed Scopus (3094) Google Scholar]. All possible precautions to reduce the risk of transmission to health care workers should be taken at all times, and the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) should be accessible and applied at all times.Patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease have a higher morbidity and mortality due to SARS-CoV-2 and precautions must be taken to avoid transmission to this at-risk population.Guidance should be taken from resources produced by the National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce [5National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce. Available at https://covid19evidence.net.au [accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar], Australian Federal Government PPE Guidelines [6Australian Federal Government Guidance on the use of PPE in hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak - Version 6 (16/06/2020). Available at https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2020/07/guidance-on-the-use-of-personal-protective-equipment-ppe-in-hospitals-during-the-covid-19-outbreak.pdf. [accessed 17.8.20]Google Scholar], the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care Guidelines [7The Australian Commission on Safety and Health in Health Care Guidelines. Available at https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/covid-19 [accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar], the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Coronavirus Guidelines [8Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Coronavirus Guidelines. Available at https://www.anzics.com.au/coronavirus-guidelines/. [accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar], Australian [9Australian Resuscitation Guidelines. Available at: https://resus.org.au/.[accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar] or New Zealand Resuscitation Guidelines [10New Zealand Resuscitation Guidelines. Available at https://www.nzrc.org.nz/covid-19/. [accessed 31.7.20]Google Scholar] and COVID-19 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) [11International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) COVID-19 recommendations. Available at https://www.ilcor.org/covid-19. [accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar], and the Australian College for Emergency Medicine [12Australian College for Emergency Medicine. Available at https://acem.org.au/ [accessed 31.7.20].Google Scholar].2.Patients With Pre-Existing Cardiovascular Disease Have Higher Morbidity and MortalityPopulation groups with higher rates of pre-existing cardiovascular disease, such as Indigenous people, and those in rural and remote areas are at higher risk of poor outcomes [13Arnold R. Tideman P. Devlin G. Carroll G. Elder A. Lowe H. et al.Rural and remote cardiology during the Covid-19 pandemic: CSANZ consensus statement.Heart Lung Circ. 2020; 29: e88-e93Abstract Full Text Full Text PDF PubMed Scopus (4) Google Scholar]. Older people, including those in aged care settings are at high risk of poor outcomes [14Holt N.R. Neumann J.T. McNeil J. Implications of COVID-19 in an aging population.Med J Aust. 6 May 2020; Crossref Scopus (2) Google Scholar]. These communities and the local health care system may experience a disproportionate burden of severe and fatal cases of COVID-19.3.Acute Cardiovascular Manifestations of COVID-19Cardiovascular sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, resulting in acute cardiac injury may present as left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmias, electrocardiograph (ECG) changes, elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and elevated troponin and other cardiovascular biomarkers. Detailed discussion of the cardiovascular sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection is provided in the Cardiovascular Disease and COVID-19: Australian/New Zealand consensus statement [15Zaman S. MacIsaac L.I. Jennings J.L.R. Schlaich M. Inglis S.C. Arnold R. et al.Cardiovascular disease and COVID-19: Australian/New Zealand consensus statement.Med J Aust. 2020; https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2020/cardiovascular-disease-and-covid-19-australiannew-zealand-consensus-statementCrossref PubMed Scopus (18) Google Scholar].The nursing implications are that SARS-CoV-2 infection patients with cardiovascular sequelae may not be referred...
Dm Taylor, Dcm Kong, Ewy Chan, Jc Knott
Published: 17 February 2011
Emergency Medicine Australasia, Volume 23, pp 1-29; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-6723.2011.01364.x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Takehiko Nohmi, Malyn Chulasiri
Genes and Environment, Volume 33, pp 111-111; https://doi.org/10.3123/jemsge.33.111

Abstract:
Japan's largest platform for academic e-journals: J-STAGE is a full text database for reviewed academic papers published by Japanese societies
Pcf Tan,
Hong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine, Volume 17, pp 154-157; https://doi.org/10.1177/102490791001700208

Abstract:
Purpose Study findings can reach a worldwide audience only after a paper is published in the peer-reviewed literature; this is regarded by many as the definitive contribution to global exchange of knowledge. The abstract to publication (A:P) rates for free papers presented at an emergency medicine meeting in Asia has not been investigated before. The purpose of this study was to determine the full publication rate of abstracts presented as oral presentations at the Third Asian Conference on Emergency Medicine (ACEM) in Hong Kong in 2004. Methods A detailed literature search of the MEDLINE database was performed using first and last authors' names and appropriate key words up to January 2008. Results A total of 54 free paper abstracts were presented at this conference as oral presentations. Ten (18.5%) abstracts had subsequently been published as full articles by the end of January 2008. The full-text articles were published in eight different journals. Conclusions The A:P ratio of abstracts for oral presentations at ACEM 2004 was 18.5%, lower than that of similar meetings in the US and Australasia. It is normal for less than half of the abstracts presented at meetings to be published as full papers in refereed journals, largely due to the inability to overcome the barriers that present at each stage towards publication. Lack of researcher time due to pressure of clinical work and English language skills may play an important role in Asia.
, Uli Dahmen
Microscopy Today, Volume 17, pp 10-13; https://doi.org/10.1017/s1551929509000303

Abstract:
The year 2009 marks the centenary of the birth of Otto Scherzer, one of the early pioneers of electron microscopy. Scherzer, shown in Figure 1, was the originator of the famous microscopy theorem that the spherical and chromatic aberrations of rotationally symmetric electron lenses were unavoidable [1]. In honor of this centennial occasion, we organized a special memorial symposium during the Microscopy & Microanalysis 2009 meeting, which was held in Richmond, Virginia, in late July. The introductory talks of the symposium presented a fascinating mix of firsthand accounts about working with Scherzer in Darmstadt and descriptions of the correction concepts and the early corrector prototypes that emerged from his group. Placed in this historical context, the latest advances in aberration correction for scanning and fixed-beam instruments that were presented in this symposium were all the more impressive and conveyed a vivid sense of history in the making. Representative applications of aberration correction to a broad range of materials were also highlighted in platform and poster presentations. Here we give a short account of the emergence of aberration-corrected electron microscopy (ACEM) and very briefly summarize some of the prospects and challenges for this burgeoning field. Further information about these developments, including details of applications, will be found in selected papers from the symposium, which will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal Microscopy and Microanalysis due to appear in mid-2010.
Emergency Medicine Australasia, Volume 17, pp 295-296; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-6723.2005.00747.x

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Emergency Medicine Australasia, Volume 17, pp 186-187; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-6723.2005.00721.x

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