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(searched for: 10.29328/journal.acee.1001030)
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Ghadami Nasim, Deravian Bita, `deravian Behzad, Takhtravan Amir, Khatibi Seyed Mohammad, Gheibi Mohammad
Annals of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Volume 5, pp 011-016; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.acee.1001030

Abstract:
Since snow load is one of the loads of designing the industrial shed roof, this research presents a new system to reduce the industrial sheds roof design. In this system, sensitive units of moisture and temperature, which can be adjusted with different areas, are installed on the shed’s roof. The mechanism of system is that the sensors in the units detect the presence of snow on the shed roof and send an order to connect electricity to the elements; therefore, the snow on the roof melts by the heat generated. In this system, solar panels are used to supply electricity. As with the help of this mechanism, snow does not remain on the roof, it is possible to eliminate the snow load in the calculations of the shed and apply at least the live load of the sixth regulation (Due to having a one-story shed, minimum live load applied and it used only for the foundation design of the structure.), this issue will create an economic plan in shed designing. According to the study conducted in this research, it is shown that the dimensions of the sheet beam used in the shed are reduced, which will significantly reduce the cost of construction and installation to some extent. In the following, two samples of sheds with a span of 20 meters in the presence of snow and the absence of snow in the software were modelled, and the results were compared with each other.
Gayan Mirihana Arachchilage, Madeline E Sherlock, Neil White, Shanker Ss Panchapakesan, Ronald R Breaker
Published: 1 April 2018
Abstract:
Riboswitches are cis-acting gene controlling RNA elements often found in 5′ UTRs of bacterial mRNAs. The discovery of riboswitches and identification of their cognate ligands have led to the revelation of several important biological pathways and processes. At least 40 different riboswitch classes have been experimentally validated, but many more are waiting to be validated (orphan riboswitches). Computational approaches including comparative genomics have proven to be very successful in identifying riboswitch candidates with a high level of confidence. However, these riboswitch candidates need to be experimentally validated by identifying their cognate ligands which can be challenging and may take much more time. Our recent bioinformatics approach to discover rare riboswitch classes by focusing on GC-rich, long intergenic regions (IGRs) in bacteria continues to add new riboswitch candidates to the growing collection of orphan riboswitches. Therefore, a high throughput and systematic method for the validation of orphan riboswitches is crucial to keep up with the pace of new riboswitch discovery by computational approaches. We are developing a higher throughput strategy to experimentally validate orphan riboswitches. This systematic process of validation includes using bioinformatics to update consensus structure models, biochemical investigation by in-line probing, and genetic validation using reporter assays. For the initial investigation, we subjected five different orphan riboswitch candidates, SLH, chrB-a, algC, aceE, and Bifido-metK to this systemic validation process. We identified Bifido-metK as the sixth class of riboswitches (SAM-VI) that sense either S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) or S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), and the results from the other riboswitch candidates have provided valuable information about their structures and functions. Thus, our improved validation methods should help to expedite the experimental validation of riboswitch candidates and make the riboswitch discovery more productive. Support or Funding Information M.E.S. was supported by an NIH Cellular and Molecular Biology Training 13 Grant (T32GM007223). This work was also supported by NIH grants to R.B. (GM022778 and DE022340). R.R.B. is also supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. This abstract is from the Experimental Biology 2018 Meeting. There is no full text article associated with this abstract published in The FASEB Journal.
Journal of Disaster Research, Volume 7, pp 671-671; https://doi.org/10.20965/jdr.2012.p0671

Abstract:
The 9th International Conference on Urban Earthquake Engineering (9th CUEE) and the 4th Asia Conference on Earthquake Engineering (4th ACEE) were jointly held on March 6-8, 2012 in Tokyo, as a part of the research activities of the Center for Urban Earthquake Engineering (CUEE), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. The conference featured state-of-the-art technical presentations on various themes relevant to urban earthquake engineering, followed by special sessions addressing the 11th March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami that resulted in catastrophic damage and an estimated death toll of 20,000. The conference attracted 465 participants from 31 countries, and disseminated 283 papers. The board members of the Journal of Disaster Research (JDR) decided to publish special issues of JDR, selecting papers from the above joint conference, for the purpose of mainly updating status of Japan’s research/technology. The present issue is on the fields of engineering seismology and geotechnical engineering, including extraordinary ground shaking and liquefactions that affected wide areas during the March 11 incident. Other issues such as those on buildings and infrastructures are also planned. The 8 manuscripts selected and managed by the JDR Guest Editors address the following topics: - Array observations of ground shaking - Large peak ground acceleration and site amplification - Attenuation of the seismic wave - Impact against the water-supply outages - Liquefaction in a river levee on soft cohesive ground - Spread foundation performance affecting superstructure - Performance of piled raft foundation with grid-form ground improvement - Liquefaction of levee body and seepage control The Guest Editors as well as JDR board members thank the authors for their contributions and revisions. They also acknowledge gratefully the reviewers for their invaluable comments on the manuscripts.
Sara J. Jones, , Laura G. Torres, Julia H. Yoo, Mark Lowry Decker,
Published: 1 January 2010
Contemporary Educational Psychology, Volume 35, pp 11-16; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2009.08.001

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