Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 10507256 / 15579077
Total articles ≅ 6,540

Latest articles in this journal

Franklin N Tessler, Johnson Thomas
Published: 24 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Background: Artificial intelligence (AI) is broadly defined as the ability of machines to apply human-like reasoning to problem-solving. Recent years have seen a rapid growth of AI in many disciplines. This review will focus on AI applications in the assessment of thyroid nodules. Summary: AI encompasses two related computational techniques: machine learning, in which computers learn by observing data provided by humans, and deep learning, which employ neural networks that mimic brain structure and function to analyze data. Some experts believe the way AI systems reach a conclusion should be transparent, or explainable, while others disagree. Most AI platforms in thyroid disease have focused on malignancy risk stratification of nodules. To date, four have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. While the results of validation studies have been mixed, there is ample evidence that AI can exceed the performance of some humans, particularly physicians with less experience. AI has also been applied to assessment of lymph nodes and cytopathology specimens. Conclusions: Adoption of AI in thyroid disease will require vendors to demonstrate that their software works as intended, is readily usable in real-world settings, and is cost effective. AI platforms that perform best in head-to-head comparisons will dominate and spur wider adoption.
Ms. Karima Merakchi, Sami Djerbib, Jacques E Dumont, Francoise Miot, Xavier De Deken
Published: 23 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Background: Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is a common autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by thyroid lymphocytic infiltrates and autoreactive antibodies against thyroglobulin (TgAbs) and thyroperoxidase. Final evolution of the disease can lead to hypothyroidism with destruction of the thyroid architecture. Interleukine-4 (IL-4) is involved in the humoral immune response and B cell activation required in autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) progression. We used our mouse model overexpressing IL-4 by thyrocytes (Thyr-IL4) to study the impact of a local IL-4 expression in AT using transgenic NOD.H2h4 derived animals treated with iodide-supplemented water to increase the incidence of spontaneous AT (SAT). Methods: Thyr-IL4 NOD.H2h4 and nonpathogenic C57BL/6 animals aged 8 weeks were exposed to 0.05% sodium iodide (NaI) in their drinking water for 8 and 16 weeks. Circulating TgAbs and expression of intrathyroidal cytokines were quantified. Thyroid inflammation was assessed by classical histological analyses including identification of some immune cell populations. The most sensitive parameter to evaluate the thyroid function, serum thyrotropin (TSH), was also measured at the end of the treatment. Results: Relative to WT animals, Thyr-IL4 NOD.H2h4 mice developed severe accelerated SAT with elevated serum TgAbs and numerous thyroid infiltrates mainly composed of CD4+/CD8+ T cells, B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Thyroid expression of T helper (Th) Th1/Th2 cytokines was also enhanced as well as IL-17. In contrast, excessive iodide supply did not induced TgAbs in WT and Thyr-IL4 SAT-resistant C57BL/6 animals. However, moderate leukocyte infiltrations in transgenic thyroids were evident compared to WT, but associated with a limited number of T and B cells and a different cytokine profile from Thyr-IL4 NOD.H2h4 mice. Finally and despite their diverse immune responses, both transgenic strains presented marked thyroid enlargement and elevated serum TSH at the end of the treatment in contrast to their WT littermates. Conclusions: These findings demonstrated that ectopic expression of IL-4 from thyrocytes enhanced the severity of accelerated SAT in disease-prone Thyr-IL4 NOD.H2h4 animals and promoted thyroid leukocyte infiltration in SAT-resistant transgenic C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, impaired thyroid function emerged in both transgenic strains during the progression of the disease.
Ayanthi Wijewardene, Karine Bastard, Bin Wang, Matti Gild, Catherine Luxford, Anthony J Gill, Bruce Robinson, Martyn Bullock, Roderick Clifton-Bligh
Published: 23 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Background: Genomic deletions in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) are rare. Selpercatinib is a highly selective RET inhibitor for treatment of metastatic RET-altered MTC. We report a case of a 35 year old male with an aggressive metastatic MTC harboring p.632_633del RET poorly responsive to RET kinase inhibitor selpercatinib. Objective Understand the clinical phenotype of p.632_633del RET in MTC in context of novel RET kinase inhibitor treatment. Methods: Wild-type and p.632_633del RET sequences were modeled using a lighter version of the AlphaFold2 (AF2) software. Functional studies were performed on transfected HEK 293 cells (pCMV6-Entry, pCMV6-RET or pCMV6-RET(p.632_633del) treated with inhibitors for 24 hours and analysed on luciferase assays. Results: Structural modeling revealed the paucity of disulfide bridge between Cys630-Cys634 in p.632_633del RET sequences, apparent in wild-type, while forming an intermolecular disulfide bridge between two Cys656. Proximity of juxtamembrane segments of each dimer may impede Tyr687 phosphorylation and stable conformation of intracellular RET that hosts selpercatinib. In vitro experiments confirmed a reduction in efficacy of selpercatinib upon p.632_633del RET compared with wild-type RET control. Conclusion: Clinical presentation together with structural modeling and functional studies suggest p.632_633del RET results inpoor response to selpercatinib.
Rosa Casany-Fernandez, Francisco Gascon-Gimenez, Enrique Juan Matarredona Solaz, Felipe Pardo Lozano, Jose Andres Dominguez-Moran, Jordi Ferri Ciscar, Jose Tomás Real
Published: 23 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Carolyn Dacey Seib, Ms. Tong Meng, Robin M Cisco, Dana T Lin, Elizabeth A McAninch, Julie Chen, Manjula Kurella Tamura, Amber W Trickey, Electron Kebebew
Published: 23 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Objective: Total thyroidectomy for Graves’ disease (GD) is associated with rapid treatment of hyperthyroidism and low recurrence rates. However, it carries the risk of surgical complications including permanent hypoparathyroidism, which contribute to long-term impaired quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of permanent hypoparathyroidism requiring calcitriol therapy among a population-based cohort of older adults undergoing total thyroidectomy for GD in the U.S. Methods: We performed a population-based cohort study using 100% Medicare claims from beneficiaries older than 65 with GD who underwent total thyroidectomy from 2007 to 2017. We required continuous enrollment in Medicare Parts A, B, and D for 12 months before and after surgery to ensure access to comprehensive claims data. Patients were excluded if they had a preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer or were on long-term preoperative calcitriol. Our primary outcome was permanent hypoparathyroidism, which was identified based on persistent use of calcitriol between 6-12 months following thyroidectomy. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify characteristics associated with permanent hypoparathyroidism, including patient age, sex, race/ethnicity, neighborhood disadvantage, Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index, urban or rural residence, and frailty. Results: We identified 4,650 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for GD during the study period and met inclusion criteria (mean age 72.8 years [SD 5.5], 86% female, and 79% white). Among this surgical cohort, 104 (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.8-2.7%) patients developed permanent hypoparathyroidism requiring calcitriol therapy. Patients who developed permanent hypoparathyroidism were on average older (mean age 74.1 vs. 72.8 years) than those who did not develop permanent hypoparathyroidism (p=0.04). On multivariable regression, older age was the only patient characteristic associated with permanent hypoparathyroidism (odds ratio [OR] age ≥ 76 years 1.68 [95% CI 1.13-2.51] compared to age 66-75 years). Conclusions: The risk of permanent hypoparathyroidism requiring calcitriol therapy among this national, U.S. population-based cohort of older adults with GD treated with total thyroidectomy was low, even when considering operations performed by a heterogeneous group of surgeons. These findings suggest the risk of hypoparathyroidism should not be a deterrent to operative management for GD in older adults who are appropriate surgical candidates.
Eman Toraih, Mohammad Hussein, Peter P. Issa, Ms. Tessa Lavorgna, Emad Kandil
Published: 23 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Ms. Zhongli Chen, Robin P Peeters, Selmar Leeuwenburgh, Ms. Michelle Broekhuizen, Rugina I. Neuman, Emilie Hitzerd, Lunbo Tan, Rutchanna M.S. Jongejan, Yolanda B. de Rijke, Irwin K. M. Reiss, et al.
Published: 23 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Background Fetal development is crucially dependent on thyroid hormone (TH). Maternal-to-fetal transfer of TH is a prerequisite for fetal TH availability, particularly in the first half of pregnancy. The mechanisms of trans-placental transport of TH, however, are yet poorly understood. We therefore investigated the TH transport processes across human placentas using an ex vivo perfusion system. Methods Intact cotyledons from term placentas of uncomplicated pregnancies were cannulated within 30 minutes after delivery and the maternal and fetal circulations were re-established. One hundred nM thyroxine (T4) was added to either the maternal or fetal circulation and perfusions run up to 3 hours during which samples were taken from both circulations at different time points. Variables included addition of iopanoic acid (IOP) to block activity of the deiodinase type 3 (D3) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to trap released T4. T4 and 3,3’,5’-triiodothyronine (rT3) concentrations in the perfusates were measured by radioimmunoassays. Results Maternal-to-fetal transfer was slow, with T4 barely detectable in the fetal circulation unless D3 was blocked by IOP. Fetal T4 was detected after 3h-perfusion (10.6±0.6 nM) when BSA (34g/l) was added in the fetal circulation to trap the released T4. In contrast, fetal-to-maternal transfer of T4 was rapid and maternal T4 increased to 43.6±5.5 nM. Conclusions Materal-to-fetal T4 transport is limited whereas fetal-to-maternal is rapid indicating that T4 transport across human term placenta is an asymmetrical process. With the high D3 activity, our observations are compatible with a protective role of the placental barrier. Future studies should reveal how the placenta exerts its gatekeeper function in ensuring optimal TH passage to the fetus.
Hannah Lee, Vimal Krishnan, , Carmelo Nucera, Mariza Venturina, , Alain Mita, Wendy Sacks
Published: 21 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer, usually with an indolent course. ALK fusions are rare in PTC but may give rise to a more aggressive behavior. We report a novel ALK fusion, CCDC149-ALK, not previously described in PTC, detected by next generation sequencing (NGS) in a 30 year-old woman with progressive, widely metastatic radioiodine-refractory (RAIR) disease to lung, muscle, and brain. The patient was started on alectinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor. Within 8 weeks, her palpable disease had completely regressed, and the serum thyroglobulin decreased dramatically. Restaging imaging demonstrated an objective partial response. Our case highlights the role of ALK fusions in thyroid cancer and highlights its clinical significance in PTC. We recommend deep mutational sequencing in BRAFV600E-negative, RAIR PTC to identify targetable genetic alterations, including gene fusions, that may result in dramatic therapeutic benefits.
, Patricia C. Conroy, Lucia Calthorpe, Amy M. Shui, , Sanziana A. Roman,
Published: 18 November 2022
Journal: Thyroid
Abstract:
Objective: Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is associated with an excellent prognosis, but patients with distant metastatic DTC have a 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) of just 50%. The incidence of distant metastatic DTC has steadily increased in the United States since the 1980s. The aim of this study was to examine trends in survival and treatment for patients with distant metastatic DTC. Methods: In this population-based, retrospective cohort study, patients with distant metastatic DTC were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-13 cancer registry program. Multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with DSS and management. Annual percentage changes in treatment patterns were calculated using log-linear regression. Results: During 1992–2018, 1991 patients (69.7% white, 58.0% female, 47.5% aged ≥65 years) were diagnosed with distant metastatic DTC. Papillary thyroid cancer was the most common histological type (74.5%). While the 10-year DSS for overall DTC increased over time (95.4% for patients diagnosed in 1992–1998, 96.6% in 1999–2008, and 97.3% in 2009–2018; p < 0.01), 10-year DSS for DTC with distant metastases did not change (50.2%, 47.3%, and 52.4%, respectively; p = 0.48). Ten-year DSS rates were reduced for patients aged ≥65 years (28.1%), patients undergoing nonsurgical treatment with external beam radiation therapy and/or systemic therapy (6.0%), and patients undergoing no/unknown treatment (32.8%). On multivariable analysis, oncocytic carcinoma, age 65–79 and ≥80 years, male sex, node-positive disease, larger tumor size, nonsurgical treatment, and no/unknown treatment were associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer death. Between 1992 and 2018, the rate of nonsurgical treatment increased, on average, 1.3% per year (1992–1998: 22.9% vs. 2009–2018: 25.6%; p = 0.03), and the rate of patients receiving no/unknown treatment increased 1.9% per year (1992–1998: 11.3% vs. 2009–2018: 15.6%; p = 0.01). Patients aged 65–79 and ≥80 years were more likely than younger patients to receive nonsurgical management or no/unknown treatment. Conclusion: Patients diagnosed with distant metastatic DTC have experienced no improvement in DSS over the past three decades. An increasing proportion of patients diagnosed with distant metastatic DTC are receiving nonsurgical treatment or no/unknown treatment over time; the proportion was highest among the oldest patients.
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