Health Education Journal

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 00178969 / 17488176
Published by: SAGE Publications
Total articles ≅ 5,077

Latest articles in this journal

Matthew E Eggers, Olaoluwa Fajobi, Lisa K Kelly, Jesse Thompson, James M Nonnemaker
Published: 18 January 2023
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221148292

Abstract:
Objective: With the proliferation of vaping in recent years, vaping-related mass media campaigns have been implemented to discourage vaping among youth and young adults. Research on salient vaping-related themes for vaping cessation is lacking. This study aimed to identify promising belief themes for use in young adult-targeted vaping cessation media campaigns. Design, Setting and Method: In 2020, we conducted an online survey of 620 New York residents aged 18 to 35 years who were currently using vape products. We asked respondents about vaping-related beliefs across multiple domains and about their intentions to quit vaping. We assessed endorsement with various belief themes and strength of association between belief themes and intention to quit vaping to identify promising themes for vaping cessation messaging. Results: Most belief themes had moderate endorsement and thus ample room to move. Among dual users and vapers only, themes of harmful ingredients and the health consequences of vaping demonstrated strong promise as themes for message targeting. Among dual users, all but two themes (smoking cessation and harm to others) demonstrated positive, statistically significant associations with intentions to quit vaping and potential percentage to gain scores with confidence intervals that did not overlap with zero. Among vapers only, themes of harmful ingredients and health consequences of vaping had the strongest association with intentions to quit vaping and the highest potential percentage to gain. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that most belief themes have substantial room to move, and that themes of harmful ingredients and health consequences of vaping are particularly promising for vaping cessation campaigns aimed towards dual users and vapers only. Study findings can be used by planners to inform the development and implementation of high-impact media campaigns to promote vaping cessation among young adults.
, Vivien Nguyen, Rowena Saheb, Erin Rutherford, Sandro Sperandei
Published: 12 January 2023
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221147615

Abstract:
Objectives: University students represent a vulnerable population to mental health and wellbeing issues. However, young people are likely to delay or fail to engage in help-seeking behaviours. Embedding mental health learning opportunities in curriculum design may improve the mental health and wellbeing of students, but there are challenges to embedding this material in non-health disciplines where students’ intrinsic interests may not align with mental health–themed coursework. To explore this challenge, the present study involved embedding mental health literacy learning into an Event Management course through an experiential learning opportunity. Design: A quasi-experimental design involving university students divided into intervention groups ( n = 40) and control groups ( n = 83). Setting: Students in the intervention groups managed events across campuses of a major Australian university in support of a University Mental Health and Wellbeing Day. Students in the control groups managed non-mental health events. Method: Pre- and post-event surveys compared students’ perceptions of experiential learning, of the effectiveness of student-led events in promoting mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviours in themselves and peers, and of embedding mental health learning into an experiential learning framework. Results: Results suggest that experiential learning opportunities that contain mental health literacy content in addition to course content can be valuable without interruption to core learning aims. Conclusion: This study is one of the first to evaluate the impact of innovative curriculum designs that embed mental health literacy in non-health disciplines, highlighting the opportunities for creative approaches to improving mental health education in universities.
Lingyi Fu, Yi Wang, Shing On Leung, Wan Ling Hu
Published: 12 January 2023
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221145804

Abstract:
Background: Physical activity (PA) is considered an important factor affecting academic achievement (AA). Different intensities of PA affect mental engagement (ME), which, in turn, affects AA. However, the role of ME in the relationship between PA and AA remains unclear. Objective: This study aimed to examine the mediating and/or moderating role of ME (i.e. cognitive flexibility [COGFLEX], metacognition [META] and competitiveness achievement motivation [COMPETE]) in the relationship between PA (both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities) and AA. Method: Structural equation modelling was used to build a mediated moderation model. A total of 68,144 students from eight economies who participated in the 2018 Programme for International Student Assessment were included in the study. Results: Moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA) was significantly positively correlated and vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) was significantly negatively correlated with AA in adolescents. COGFLEX, META and COMPETE were found to play a significant mediating role in the relationship between both types of PA (MPA and VPA) and AA. COGFLEX and COMPETE were found to moderate the relationship between VPA and AA. Conclusion: ME plays a mediated moderation role in the relationship between the intensity of PA and AA. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
, Abdessalem Koubaa, Omar Trabelsi, Liwa Masmoudi, Bessem Mkaouer, Khaled Trabelsi, Haitham Jahrami, , Mourad Bahloul
Published: 12 January 2023
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221147609

Abstract:
Background: Maintaining physical distancing is one of the most important steps to enforce in educational institutions to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19. However, close proximity and physical contact between students are often considered ‘normal’ during physical education (PE) classes, making it challenging for PE teachers to ensure physical distancing. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the implementation of the Good Behaviour Game (GBG) in maintaining physical distancing in PE settings in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: In a quasi-experimental design, two groups were separately designated as an experimental group (20 classes involving 220 students) and a control group (20 classes involving 231 students). They were all enrolled in the eighth grade of the Tunisian education system. In the experimental group, the PE teacher managed physical distancing by administering the GBG. Physical distancing was evaluated by direct observation of videos of filmed PE sessions using a code grid. It was measured twice for the two groups using Kinovea software. Results: Quantitative data analyses showed that the level of maintaining physical distancing increased after the GBG intervention in the experimental group ( p < .001). Furthermore, greater percent changes between pre- and post-intervention were identified in the experimental group compared to the control group (120% vs 1%, respectively). Conclusion: The GBG was effective in ensuring students’ physical distancing when implemented in PE settings.
, Grace Preston, Ursula Kenny
Published: 11 January 2023
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221146635

Abstract:
Background: ‘Fat Talk’, or the act of negatively discussing one’s own or another person’s body, is linked to body image constructs, body dissatisfaction, low self-esteem and disordered eating. The spaces in which young women talk about the body are changing, as social media use escalates. Understanding the interplay between social media use, body image and fat talk, in different contexts, is needed. Method: Focus group interviews were used to explore how young women (aged 15–19) experience fat talk while using social media and the possible effect on body image constructs. Using purposive convenience sampling, young women who regularly used social media and were living in an inner city of England were recruited. Thematic analysis was used for analysis and six themes were identified, both a priori and inductively, to explore the interplay between them. Findings: Over 35 women were successfully recruited into the study, with 18 of these finally participating in focus group interviews. Among participants, social media use was linked to increased self-evaluation of the body, engagement in social comparative behaviour and negative self-talk about the body. Although fat talk was reportedly common and widespread, it was unacceptable in the online space. However, body talk, other than size or shape, was permissible. Conclusion: Fat talk can be divisive; however, if it becomes unacceptable in the online space, negative self-talk may increase. If fat talk is replaced by an all-encompassing ‘body talk’, then this too may exacerbate existing pressures on young people and their mental health and well-being. Understanding the relationship between social media, body dissatisfaction and body talk may provide new opportunities for health education to promote a more constructive prevention discourse of the body, including body talk, in or around the online space.
Rasiha Güler, Gülümser Kublay,
Published: 4 January 2023
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221146429

Abstract:
Objective: This study sought to analyse the effectiveness of a nurse-led health development programme for school-aged children in North Cyprus. Design: This study utilised a randomised-controlled experimental research design. Setting: The study was conducted on fourth-grade students in two primary schools. Method: Participants in the intervention group received a 12-week online health education course. Students in both the control ( n = 38) and intervention ( n = 38) groups completed the Food Behaviour Scale, the Children Health Perceptions and Behaviours Scale, and the Physical Activity Self-Efficacy Scale pre-intervention, at the end of intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Results: Post-test scores for the intervention group on the Food Behaviour Scale, Children Health Perceptions and Behaviours Scale, and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy Scale were significantly higher than their pre-test scores. In contrast, the control group exhibited no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-test scores on the three scales. Conclusion: The findings suggest that a nurse-led health education programme had a positive effect on food behaviour, physical activity self-efficacy, and health perception and behaviours among school-age children.
, , Jennifer Turnnidge, Nancy Dalgarno, , Lucie Pelland
Published: 23 December 2022
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221145351

Abstract:
Objective: To describe the creation of an educational podcast with ‘living cases’ of older adults to support students’ learning on a gerontology course and report on students’ evaluation of the project. Setting: Gerontology course in a graduate programme. Method: We developed a podcast series based on interviews with older adults in the community following recent guidelines for creating educational podcasts. The podcast episodes were used in a case-based group assignment to work on during the course and to present findings at the end. Evaluation: Student experiences were evaluated using a mixed-methods survey. Results: From November 2019 to January 2021, case-based podcasts, averaging 17 minutes in length, were created and evaluated. Most students found the content of the podcasts relevant to working with older adults and increased their understanding of the issues facing members of that population. Qualitative analysis of the survey findings found that the overall strengths of the podcasts were that they were well structured, provided an authentic, real-world experience, allowed listeners to experience an innovative teaching strategy, promoted reflection, and encouraged students to consider a future career working with older adults. Students also recommended ways to improve the podcasts. Conclusion: Delivering living case studies using podcasts is a feasible, inexpensive and effective teaching method for improving physiotherapy students’ attitudes towards caring for older adults. Students enjoyed learning via the podcasts and found them a valuable way to better understand the issues facing older adults. The living case podcasts could have broad applicability to other aging and health courses.
, Kristel May D Casimiro, Jolly Anne L Gibe, Ninna Sandra F Fernandez, Denise C Tumaneng, Erin Ceejay A Sandoval, Philippe Jose S Hernandez, Marie Antonette Quan-Nalus, Froilan A Alipao
Published: 22 December 2022
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221141547

Abstract:
Objectives: Mental health problems such as anxiety and depression have been steadily rising among university students in the Philippines. While there exists literature determining students’ quality of life and health access behaviour, there remains a substantial gap in having a local framework with which to understand their vulnerabilities. In this paper, we aim to identify the socio-cultural factors that exacerbate the challenges that Filipino university students navigate in their attainment of well-being. Design: The study used an exploratory qualitative design. Setting: Data were collected from university students attending a private higher education institution in Manila, the Philippines. Method: Using a cultural epidemiological approach and a qualitative design, semi-structured interviews were conducted online with 60 university-level students. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and translated into English. Data were open coded and thematically analysed. Results: The lived experience of 60 university students revealed that factors including volatile household dynamics, intergenerational [mis]understanding of mental illness, stressful academic engagement and religious associations contributed to the individual framing of their conditions, which ranged from self-stigma to self-prescribed isolation. Various experiences linked to the Filipino value of pagdamay (sharing the burden) significantly aided students’ management of their conditions. Conclusion: Drawing on the narratives elicited, a community-based approach using the university as the core for intervention delivery is proposed that may positively impact on students’ mental health seeking behaviour.
, Piri Welcsh, Craig T Dearfield, Kelly Owens, Lisa Rezende, Susan J Friedman
Published: 22 December 2022
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221145802

Abstract:
Objective: Women aged 45 or younger with breast cancer, or those who are at high risk of breast cancer due to a family history of the disease or genetic test results indicating risk, have distinct health risks and needs. Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE), a non-profit advocacy organisation, developed an online resource designed to address these needs. Design: In-person surveys were administered to compare baseline and post-test knowledge of two cohorts of 55 volunteer participants. Both groups read a printed media news article related to breast cancer research. The intervention group also read a printed brief review that provided a summary of research findings, and discussion and ratings of research evidence and reporting quality. Setting: Participants were recruited at two FORCE conferences. Data were collected at the conference sites. Method: Pilot and follow-up sample results were pooled and analysed using t-test comparisons. Results: The intervention resource use was associated with a significantly greater increase in knowledge than only reading the media news article. Conclusion: An online tool developed to respond to audience needs, offering ratings of evidence quality and relevance, can help readers to better understand research reporting.
Michelle Parisi, Danielle McFall, Samuel Ankomah, Christina J Dietz, Samantha Kanny, Kadalynn Grace Jones, Michelle Stancil, Windsor Westbrook Sherrill
Published: 21 December 2022
Health Education Journal; https://doi.org/10.1177/00178969221143218

Abstract:
Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate how a 1-hour education session that highlights American Heart Association/American Diabetes Association’s Know Diabetes by Heart (KDBH) messaging changed the knowledge and behavioural intention of participants. Design: Single group, quasi-experimental study evaluating the impact of the KDBH education intervention on participants’ knowledge and intentions to engage in risk-lowering behaviours related to the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Setting: A free, 1-hour, synchronously delivered education session was offered through an online platform and facilitated by Cooperative Extension agents. Methods: A pre- and post-Qualtrics survey was used to assess changes in knowledge and intended behaviours. Slides were provided by the American Diabetes Association and tailored for clarification and evaluation purposes. Results: The study included 259 adults with an average age of 54 years (standard deviation [ SD] = 16.67) and 72.97% being 46 years or older. When participants were asked if having type 2 diabetes put them at risk for development of hypertension, unhealthy cholesterol levels, heart attack, or stroke, 84.84% answered correctly at baseline. After session completion, the percentage correct increased to 92.2% ( p = .002). Individual’s knowledge of cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes was assessed; 66.80% answered correctly pre-intervention. After completing the KDBH programme, 95.37% answered correctly ( p = .001). In addition, more than half of those with type 2 diabetes reported intended to adopt several behaviours related to reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease at the completion of the programme. Conclusions: The pilot study indicates successful information transfer in a 1-hour education session focused on chronic disease risks associated with T2DM. Results support the use of synchronous online platforms for diabetes and heart disease information transfer. Future prospective studies measuring sustained knowledge, behaviour adoption and incidence of heart-disease before and after education are needed.
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