Virtual Reality

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 13594338 / 14349957
Published by: Springer Nature
Total articles ≅ 876

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 15 November 2022
Journal: Virtual Reality
Abstract:
Augmented Reality (AR) has become an increasingly used technology to support and enhance the enjoyment of cultural heritage. Particularly relevant is its importance for digital storytelling: by framing a portion of a fresco or painting with a smartphone, an AR mobile application can provide contextually relevant information, also in the form of multimedia content, that can help the user to understand the story and meaning behind the images. In this type of application, human factors are of fundamental importance for the effectiveness of the narrative: a mobile AR application must avoid distracting the user’s attention from the content in order to encourage a good level of concentration and immersion. The case study presented in this paper deals with a mobile AR application developed to guide visitors in the interpretation of the frescoes inside the Basilica of Saint Catherina of Alexandria in Galatina. The aim of the study is the analysis of the relations among usability, user experience and mental workload factors in AR-based digital storytelling.
Published: 14 November 2022
Journal: Virtual Reality
Abstract:
Faced with the ongoing diversification and commercial success of highly immersive media technologies (e.g., VR headsets), both content producers and scientific scholars have become highly invested in understanding the psychological consequences of experiencing media in these new and lifelike ways. While many studies underscore positive effects of high media immersivity—such as increased enjoyment or persuasive success—others warn about the intense cognitive load that technologies such as VR might put on their users. In a laboratory experiment with N = 121 participants, we compare the cognitive load experienced while watching a 360° video on a laptop screen or via an immersive VR head-mounted display. Furthermore, we scrutinize two prominent explanations for the additional cognitive load in immersive media settings, i.e., the role of spatial presence and cybersickness. As expected, the VR condition results in higher cognitive load, spatial presence, and cybersickness than the 2D condition. However, by means of a parallel mediation model, we observe that only cybersickness emerges as a meaningful mediator of participants’ strained cognitive capacity; spatial presence, on the other hand, remains statistically irrelevant in this regard. We discuss our findings considering implications for media producers and future research.
Published: 26 October 2022
Journal: Virtual Reality
Abstract:
The current manuscript verifies the use of virtual reality (VR)-based methodology as a helpful way to study human behavior during the pre-evacuation period, considering the influence of pre-emergency activity (competitive tasks). Two conditions with different engagement levels (i.e., low and high) were set up, and sixty company workers were distributed across conditions randomly. Five types of evacuation behaviors were defined, and compliance behavior results showed most participants (66.7%) evacuated with the ISO-type evacuation alarm in low engagement condition, whereas only 20% of participants evacuated in high engagement situation. Statistical results confirmed the influence of pre-emergency activity on evacuation efficiency. Open-ended questions summarized three levels of knowledge background that justified the reasons/motivations behind pre-evacuation behaviors. simulator sickness, presence, and usability questionnaires confirmed the variable control between conditions. In summary, the VR-based methodology successfully reproduced evacuation behaviors similar to real situations, with the influence of pre-emergency activity. This study added a step to the efficacy of using VR as a tool to study human behavior during the pre-evacuation period and pointed out the need for the next generation of alarms, which will improve human safety in building emergencies.
Published: 20 October 2022
Journal: Virtual Reality
Abstract:
Virtual reality (VR) is thought of as a promising educational medium, especially for learning actions, as it enables learning by enactment. Learning by enactment is associated with the enactment effect which describes a superior memory for enacted actions compared to actions which have not been enacted. To date, however, little is known about whether the enactment effect across different conditions of action learning can be found in VR which sets the stage for our first research question. Additionally, as a second research question, this study explores the extent to which the memory performance of learning by enactment in VR corresponds to learning by enactment in physical reality. We conducted a VR between subjects experiment with four groups (N = 112) that differed in terms of condition or environment. Participants were asked to remember short action phrases for a subsequent memory test. The results indicate that learning by enactment in VR outperforms learning by reading in VR but does not exceed observational learning in VR. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the memory performance of learning by enactment in VR is similar to that in physical reality. These findings are highly relevant as they demonstrate the potential of VR as a new educational medium supporting learning by enactment.
Back to Top Top