Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 18739318 / 18739326
Published by: Springer Nature
Total articles ≅ 1,259

Latest articles in this journal

Pei Zhang, Ying Zhou, Ying Chen, Miaotong Yu,
Published: 3 December 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01293-x

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Roshini Praveen Kumar, Brema J., Cyril Samuel,
Published: 30 November 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01290-0

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Christos D. Argyropoulos, Vasiliki Skoulou, Georgios Efthimiou,
Published: 28 November 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-57; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01286-w

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 28 November 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01288-8

Abstract:
The health impacts associated with exposure to elevated concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are well recognised. There is a substantial number of studies characterising PM2.5 concentrations outdoors, as well as in homes within low- and middle-income countries. In high-income countries (HICs), there is a sizeable literature on indoor PM2.5 relating to smoking, but the evidence on exposure to PM2.5 generated from non-tobacco sources in homes is sparse. This is especially relevant as people living in HICs spend the majority of their time at home, and in the northern hemisphere households often have low air exchange rates for energy efficiency. This review identified 49 studies that described indoor PM2.5 concentrations generated from a variety of common household sources in real-life home settings in HICs. These included wood/solid fuel burning appliances, cooking, candles, incense, cleaning and humidifiers. The reported concentrations varied widely, both between sources and within groups of the same source. The burning of solid fuels was found to generate the highest indoor PM2.5 concentrations. On occasion, other sources were also reported to be responsible for high PM2.5 concentrations; however, this was only in a few select examples. This review also highlights the many inconsistencies in the ways data are collected and reported. The variable methods of measurement and reporting make comparison and interpretation of data difficult. There is a need for standardisation of methods and agreed contextual data to make household PM2.5 data more useful in epidemiological studies and aid comparison of the impact of different interventions and policies.
Elizanne P. S. Justo, Maria Fernanda Cáceres Quijano, Karmel Beringui, Luciana Baptista Ventura, Guilherme Martins Pereira, Pérola De Castro Vasconcellos,
Published: 3 November 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-21; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01275-z

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, Virpi Kollanus, Pekka Tiittanen, Santtu Mikkonen, Anne H. Lipponen, Siqi Zhang, Susanne Breitner, Alexandra Schneider, Timo Lanki
Published: 2 November 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01259-z

Abstract:
There is only limited scientific evidence with varying results on the association between hospital admissions and low ambient temperatures. Furthermore, there has been no research in Northern Europe on cold-associated morbidity. Therefore, this study investigated the associations of daily wintertime temperature and cold spells with cardiorespiratory hospital admissions in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland. Daily number of non-elective hospital admissions for 2001–2017 was obtained from the national hospital discharge register and meteorological data from the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Quasi-Poisson regression models were fitted, controlling for potential confounders such as time trend, weekday, holidays, air pollution, barometric pressure, and influenza. The associations of cold season daily mean ambient temperature and cold spells with hospital admissions were estimated using a penalized distributed lag linear models with 21 lag days. Decreased wintertime ambient temperature was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for myocardial infarction in the whole population (relative risk [RR] per 1 °C decrease in temperature: 1.017, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.002–1.032). An increased risk of hospital admission for respiratory diseases (RR: 1.012, 95% CI: 1.002, 1.022) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR: 1.031, 95% CI: 1.006, 1.056) was observed only in the ≥ 75 years age group. There was an independent effect of cold spell days only for asthma admissions (RR: 2.348, 95% CI: 1.026, 5.372) in the all-ages group. Cold temperature increases the need for acute hospital care due to myocardial infarction and respiratory causes during winter in a northern climate.
Yufan Zhu, , Guangyao Li, Jing She, Yuhuan Zhu, Wei Sun, Xiao Liu, Qiulan Wang
Published: 1 November 2022
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11869-022-01279-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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