Social Problems

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 00377791 / 15338533
Total articles ≅ 6,341

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 22 November 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
Existing sociological literature provides conflicting theoretical accounts of disadvantaged youth’s aspirations. While structuralists and rational choice theorists contend that disadvantaged young people tend to form low aspirations in the face of limited structural opportunities, cultural sociologists maintain that disadvantaged youth construct highly aspirational imagined futures to claim their moral self-worth in the present. I argue that incorporating time frames into the study of aspirations helps resolve the tension by enabling researchers to investigate when—in what time frame—one model works better than others. I demonstrate the value of this approach using qualitative interviews with 31 eighth-grade students in China’s rural Shanxi Province, where structural constraints of socioeconomic attainment undercut cultural ideals of social mobility. In this context, findings show that respondents focused on practical constraints from their academic performance and family economic strains when projecting their short-term futures (structural/rational choice model) while they constructed future selves distinctive from rural origins in their long-term futures (cultural model). I conclude by discussing this approach’s implications for studying aspirations, expectations, and their relationships to educational and career outcomes.
Published: 11 October 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Social Problems, Volume 69, pp 1193-1197; https://doi.org/10.1093/socpro/spac056

Abstract:
Agadjanian, VictorSee Menjívar, Cecilia678 Alsbergas, EliasSee Quark, Amy418 Andrews, Abigail Forced Out of Fatherhood: How Men Strive to Parent Post-Deportation699 Annavarapu, Sneha Risky Routes, Safe Suspicions: Gender, Class, and Cabs in Hyderabad, India761 Baldor, Tyler Acquainted Strangers: Thwarted Interaction in Digitally Mediated Urban Gay Bars58 Barber, JenniferSee Clark, Anne1068 Barragan, Melissa Policing & Punishing Illegal Gun Behavior: An Examination of Jail Detainee Experiences with Gun Law Enforcement in Los Angeles1170 Bayurgil, Ladin Fired and Evicted: Istanbul Doorkeepers' Strategies of Navigating Employment and Housing Precarity1092 Bergstrand, Kelly Threat and Emotions: Mobilizing and Attitudinal Outcomes of a Ballistic Missile Scare184 Besbris, MaxSee Rhodes, Anna1137 Boch, Anna The Limits of Tolerance: Extreme Speakers on Campus143 Carian, Emily K. The Agency Myth: Persistence in Individual Explanations for Gender Inequality123 Clark, Anne Mechanisms Linking High Residential Mobility to Decreased Contraceptive Use: The Importance of Method Availability1068 Clarke, AndrewSee Parsell, Cameron436
Published: 11 October 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Social Problems, Volume 69, pp 1188-1192; https://doi.org/10.1093/socpro/spac057

Abstract:
It is impossible to edit a journal without the help of reviewers. We are struck again and again by the dedication, quality, and professionalism that characterize the reviews conducted for Social Problems. The following have completed at least one review during the period June 1, 2021 through May 31, 2022. Thank you! –Annulla Linders, Earl Wright II, and Derrick Brooms, co-Editors Melissa Abad Seth Abrutyn Linuz Aggeborn Onwubiko Agozino Adalberto Aguirre Caitlin Ahearn Beatriz Aldana Marquez Shaonta' Allen Alexandra Allweiss Rene Almeling Geoffrey Alpert Duane Alwin Kermyt Anderson Elisabeth Anderson Denise Anthony Scott Aquqnno Erika Arenas Madison Armstrong Pamela Aronson Christobel Asiedu Nina Attwood Daniel Auguste Kelly Austin Marian Azab Jules Bacon Michael Bader Meredith Bagley Joseph Baker Regina Baker Elizabeth Baker Bianca Baldridge Bridgette Baldwin Aysegul Balta Ozgen John Balzarini Stephen Barnard Sandra Barnes Marina Barnett Allyson Baughman Dawn Baunach Jean Beaman Katie Beardall Brenden Beck Jacob Becker Richard Behun
, Zennon Black
Published: 10 September 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
Scholars posit that lower-income undergraduates experience “cultural mismatch,” which undermines their sense of belonging, promotes withdrawal from campus, and limits mobility upon graduation. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 103 undergraduates at an elite university, we examine how students’ diverse trajectories to college affect how they identify as members of the community and modulate the relationship between social class and sense of belonging. While upper-income undergraduates find commonalities between themselves and college peers and integrate into the community, lower-income students offer divergent accounts. The doubly disadvantaged—lower-income undergraduates who attended local, typically distressed public high schools—felt a heightened sense of difference, drew moral boundaries, and withdrew from campus life. Alternatively, the privileged poor—lower-income undergraduates who attended boarding, day, and preparatory high schools—adopted a cosmopolitan approach focused on continued expansion of horizons and integrated into campus. Through detailing this overlooked diversity among lower-income undergraduates, our findings expand theoretical frameworks for examining sense of belonging to include boundary work that shapes students’ agendas, thereby deepening our understanding of the reproduction of inequality in college.
Published: 10 September 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
An established literature demonstrates that formerly imprisoned people experience barriers to finding work. However, no research has analyzed how noncitizens experience socioeconomic reintegration following imprisonment. Additionally, while we know many immigrants find work in co-ethnic labor markets, we know little about how these networks respond to individuals with a criminal record. I analyze 321 longitudinal, semi-structured interviews collected between 2013–2016 from 121 noncitizens who were detained by U.S. immigration authorities for six months or longer and then released back into their communities on bond. Results reveal a complex set of socioeconomic reintegration experiences that are shaped by ethnic, legal, generational, and gender stratification in immigrant integration outcomes more broadly. These findings have important implications as immigration laws have become increasingly punitive and intertwined with criminal laws.
Published: 30 August 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
Reflexive Statement I want to start this presentation with some of what I’ve learned from being a humanist sociologist, nurtured by my almost thirty-year membership in...
, Daysi X Diaz-Strong, Yunuen Rodriguez Rodriguez
Published: 24 August 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
Scholars have long demonstrated that the state monopolizes time and imposes waiting, with disproportional impacts for marginalized groups relative to other political subjects. Extending this literature with a life course framework, we analyze how receipt of legal relief in different periods of life shapes the impacts of policy provisions. We draw on the case of undocumented Latin American immigrants targeted by executive immigration actions (DACA and DAPA), designed to extend temporary access to employment, protection from deportation, and the ability to exit and legally re-enter the United States. Through a comparative analysis of interviews (N = 82) across three age cohorts—coming of age, young adult, and middle age—we find the impact of these state-extended benefits differentially concentrates in the domains of schooling, employment, and family. The paper contributes an analysis of state power through a life course framework, deepening understanding of undocumented immigrants’ experiences of state-controlled time, waiting, and “illegality.”
, Scott Frickel, Aaron Niznik
Published: 24 August 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
The study investigates the way local social movements respond to structural transformations in city politics. Drawing from archival research, published scholarship, and 51 in-depth interviews, we characterize the mobilization of experts into social movements in Greater Boston since the 1960s as a long-term shift from “protecting places” to “providing services.” Consonant with a shift from centralized to decentralized municipal government, we show how an initially unified resistance to urban renewal morphed into two diverging and opposing movements. One focused on housing affordability and relied on market-driven tactics; the other sought to enhance the “production of nature” through grassroots community organizing. These findings support two contributions to the scholarship on expert activism by showing that: (1) social movement organizations (SMOs) respond to structural shifts epistemologically, as well as organizationally; and (2) expert activism can alter the conditions and context of knowledge production in neighborhoods and the movements that rise in their defense.
Minyoung An,
Published: 17 August 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
How does gender shape how conservatives “do partisanship”? This paper draws on interviews with a group of conservative Americans—gun sellers—during a year of record gun sales amid a global pandemic, civil unrest, and democratic instability. In 2020, gun sellers navigated an increasingly diverse clientele, including what they understood as an increase in liberal, progressive, and leftist gun buyers. This unique influx bucked decades-long trends of partisan sorting in America and compelled gun sellers to “do partisanship” as they fielded the new gun buyers in their stores. Integrating the literatures on the gender gap in partisanship with scholarship on hegemonic masculinity, this paper examines how gun sellers mobilized masculinity as a means of expressing and engaging in partisanship. Our analysis details how interviewees (1) embrace a brand of hegemonic masculinity that champions self-preservation and preparedness, (2) define themselves against liberal politics and policies they deem emasculating, and (3) draw partisan boundaries around gun ownership that reinforce conservatives as responsible gun owners while denigrating liberals as emotional, impressionable, and incompetent. We argue that partisanship can be understood as a gendered practice that provides insight into how conservatives make political meaning in their everyday lives.
Published: 10 August 2022
Journal: Social Problems
Abstract:
Bourdieu’s field theory has become a key heuristic for studying the impact of the market on American journalism, but this approach has not been employed to analyze the consequences of a technology-driven decline in advertising revenue. To understand this change and update the commercial critique of journalism, I extend the emerging Bourdieusian historical research program to chart transformations in the market’s heteronomous effects on journalism. To do so, I highlight how the New York Times was exceptionally positioned to manage heteronomy as it emanated through the technology, political, and financial fields. This analysis throws the crisis of the wider field into relief, a field I characterize as an “inverted pyramid” to reflect how the Times’ success deepened hierarchy, while also giving it the freedom to reinvent orthodoxy in a wide space of possibility atop the field.
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