Curationis

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 03798577 / 22236279
Published by: AOSIS Open Journals
Total articles ≅ 2,078

Latest articles in this journal

Lukoye Atwoli, Gregory E. Erhabor, Aiah A. Gbakima, Abraham Haileamlak, Jean-Marie Kayembe Ntumba, James Kigera, Laurie Laybourn-Langton, Robert Mash, Joy Muhia, Fhumulani M. Mulaudzi, et al.
Published: 4 November 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Curationis provides a forum for cutting-edge theories and research models related to the exploration of issues experienced and the best practices of nurses and midwives so as to improve nursing education, nursing administration and community nursing within Africa.
Tintswalo Vukeya, Annie Temane, Marie Poggenpoel
Published: 31 October 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Curationis provides a forum for cutting-edge theories and research models related to the exploration of issues experienced and the best practices of nurses and midwives so as to improve nursing education, nursing administration and community nursing within Africa.
Idah Moyo, Azwihangwisi H. Mavhandu-Mudzusi, Clara Haruzivishe
Published: 30 June 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a far-reaching, negative impact on healthcare systems worldwide. Healthcare workers play a critical role in the country’s healthcare delivery system, as they facilitate a continuum of care and containment of diseases such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of healthcare workers who provided care to COVID-19 patients at a central hospital in Zimbabwe. Method: The researchers used an interpretative phenomenological analysis design. In-depth interviews were conducted virtually with 10 frontline healthcare workers working at a COVID-19 centre in Zimbabwe. Data collection was guided by an interview guide. All audio-recorded interview data were transcribed verbatim into written text. Data analysis was conducted using an interpretative phenomenological analysis framework. An expert in qualitative research acted as an independent co-coder and conducted the open coding of each transcript. Results: Findings reveal inadequate preparation and training of healthcare providers before the commencement of duty, resources-related challenges and a lack of support as significant experiences of healthcare providers. Moreover, healthcare providers have been subjected to stigma and discrimination attached to COVID-19, resulting in psychological effects on frontline healthcare providers. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic brings unique and challenging experiences for frontline healthcare workers, resulting in a physically and emotionally drained workforce. This study calls for comprehensive support in the form of counselling, reasonable work schedules, training and adequate provision of personal protective equipment.
Pule S. Moabi, Ntombifiakile G. Mtshali
Published: 30 May 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: In order to ensure an effective health system, there is a need to recruit, train and deploy a competent nursing workforce. A competent workforce can be made possible by integrating simulation into the curriculum. Implementation of simulation-based education in Lesotho is facing a number of challenges as the country has limited resources. Objectives: This study aimed to describe nurse educators and students’ perspectives on ways to improve implementation of simulation-based education in Lesotho. Method: A qualitative study was conducted. A total of 24 students, 24 nurse educators and 4 principals who were purposely selected participated in the study. Focus group discussions as one of the data collection methods were used to collect data from the nurse educators and students whilst in-depth, unstructured individual interviews were used with the principals. Data were analysed following the Corbin and Strauss grounded theory approach where similar codes were categorised together as part of open coding, and axial coding was conducted by refining the codes and organising them into categories and subcategories. Results: Two categories emerged from the areas where improvement is required: resources to support simulation. Resources emerged as playing a major role in ensuring quality simulation. The teaching and learning process emerged as collaborative in nature with all key players ensuring that they meet their responsibilities in order to ensure effective simulation-based learning. Conclusion: The study revealed that there are limited numbers of simulation facilitators and this hinders effective implementation of simulation. Students are concerned about the comments of educators during simulation, as some of the comments are belittling.
Siyabulela N. Wopula, , Elizabeth Nkosi
Published: 10 January 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: Operational Managers (OMs) in primary health care (PHC) experienced new management dynamics during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). They were not sufficiently prepared to deal with the extraordinary challenges brought by this global pandemic. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe the PHC OMs’ experiences of new management dynamics in PHC facilities, created by COVID-19 pandemic. Method: This study used a qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design and a phenomenological approach. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured individual interviews. Data saturation was reached by the 7th interview and two more interviews were done to confirm data saturation. Data analysis was conducted using Giorgi’s descriptive thematic phenomenological data analysis method. An independent coder was implored to confirm the findings. This study was guided by Rogers Diffusion of Innovation Theory. Ethical considerations were applied throughout the research process. Results: One central theme and three main themes emerged as; stretching of inadequate resources. themes; (1) budgetary cuts and increasing demands of resources, (2) insufficient of personal protective equipment, other general supplies and human resources, and (3) compromised service delivery and increased client’s dissatisfaction. Conclusion: This study revealed that OMs were over stretched and overwhelmed by the management on PHC facilities due to COVID-19 pandemic dynamics. Contribution: The findings of this study can be implemented in PHC facilities to effectively deal with future pandemics of such a nature.
Annie Temane, Maide Manamela,
Published: 10 January 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: A national tragedy occurred between October 2015 and June 2016 when psychiatric patients with profound intellectual disabilities were transferred from psychiatric care centres to non-governmental organisations (NGOs). The process of transferring psychiatric patients had severe consequences for psychiatric patients and psychiatric nurses. Objectives: The study’s objective was to explore and describe psychiatric nurses’ experiences after the closure of Life Esidimeni psychiatric care centres. Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was employed. Semi-structured interviews were utilised to collect data. Purposive sampling was utilised to select eight psychiatric nurses to participate in the study. Data were analysed using Tesch’s thematic method of coding. Results: The analysis of data revealed the following themes: With the closure of the care centres participants experienced (1) shock, dismay and life interruption; (2) trauma related to the disintegration, of psychiatric patients’ lives, their own families and work-life and (3) sense of resilience. Conclusion: From the findings, it is clear that the psychiatric nurses needed support as evidenced by the challenges they experienced. The healthcare professionals in mental health and mental health nursing post-graduate students could conduct further research focusing on the experiences and the impact that the closure of Life Esidimeni psychiatric care centres have on the psychiatric nurses’ mental health. Contribution: This study contributes to the body of knowledge in psychiatric nursing by highlighting the impact of hospital closure on psychiatric nurses.
Avhatakali A. Ndou-Mammbona,
Published: 10 January 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: Several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention strategies have been implemented to counteract the impact of the disease, including the use of condoms, social marketing, testing, voluntary counselling and education programmes. One of the platforms which has not been fully explored is that of traditional initiation schools. Objectives: This study aimed to explore and discuss Vhavenda traditional initiation schools, which can be used as panacea for HIV and AIDS management in the Vhembe district of South Africa. Method: This ethnographic study was conducted in the Vhembe district of South Africa, among nine purposively sampled key informants drawn from a cohort of Vhavenda traditional healers and leaders. Data were collected using semistructured face-to-face interviews and analysed using ethnographic content analysis. Results: The results indicate that Vhavenda traditional initiation schools positively affect the management of HIV and AIDS. Initiation schools are centres for cultural education and the formation of a cultural identity. During the initiation process, initiates are taught social norms, customs and values which will serve them well in adulthood. They are also taught matters of sexuality, courtship, marriage and respect for others. Conclusion: The positive attributes of Vhavenda initiation schools should be accommodated and implemented in curricula from the primary school level up to the tertiary level to reduce and curb the spread of HIV infection. Contribution: Improved expertise at the initiation schools will aid the Department of Health and Education and Training to develop and implement suitable cultural contextualised HIV and AIDS prevention strategies.
, Sophy M. Moloko
Published: 10 January 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: Nurses’ training has been mostly face-to-face in the South African context. This mode of delivery was linked to producing nurses who are critical thinkers, problem solvers and competent in practical skills. However, the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) accelerated the need for online teaching in nursing. Nurse lecturers were forced to teach online in order to save the academic project, despite concerns about the competencies and calibre of nurses produced through online teaching. Objectives: This study aimed to explore and describe nurse lecturers’ experiences with online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic at a public university in Gauteng, South Africa. Method: A qualitative, exploratory design was utilised. Six nurse lecturers – two males and four females – were purposefully selected to participate in this study. Data were collected through in-depth interviews to obtain rich, thick descriptions from the nurse lecturers who experienced online teaching. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Results: Five themes emerged as, (1) challenges related to the learner management system; (2) challenges related to competency; (3) factors out of the span of control of the lecturer; (4) indirect benefits of online teaching; and (5) recommendations to facilitate the smooth delivery of online teaching. Conclusion: The findings established that nurse lecturers experienced challenges when teaching online, which resulted in frustrations and discomfort for lecturers. Contribution: The study revealed the challenges nurse lecturers faced while teaching online. It highlights the need for nurse lecturers to be trained and supported to enhance online teaching and learning.
Sundira D. Mottian, , Kefiloe A. Maboe
Published: 10 January 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: Nursing developed over centuries. Changing practice and education influenced its interpretation and understanding. Its meaning and interpretation may differ amongst education institutions, nurse educators and nurses, particularly student nurses. Objectives: The objective was to develop a visual concept map of the concept of ‘nursing’, allowing nursing education institutions to have a similar approach and understanding in teaching the concept to student nurses. Method: The research design was qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual. A self-designed, pretested online questionnaire collected data from various categories of nurse participants. An integrative review viewed literature sources published between 2006 and 2016 accessing definitions of ‘nursing’. Data analysis involved thematic analysis of narrative data, data coding processes, interpretation and synthesis of data and further analysis using a systematic concept analysis process. The combined analysed data merged, developing a visual concept map of ‘nursing’. Expert nurse educators validated the visual concept map of ‘nursing’ by e-Delphi technique, using an assessment rubric. Results: Various definitions of ‘nursing’ revealed identified themes and categories underpinning the concept. After formulation of connotative, denotative definitions and empirical referents, a visual concept map of ‘nursing’ was developed and validated to be an educational tool to facilitate the teaching of the concept of ‘nursing’, enhancing a similar understanding and interpretation thereof. Conclusion: A visual concept map of ‘nursing’, a tool facilitating teaching the concept and promoting similar understanding of its meaning is valuable in an evolving digital era, where visual stimulation enhances teaching and learning. Contribution: The primary contribution of the manuscript provided a developed visual concept map of ‘nursing’, to use as a tool to stimulate critical thinking and integrate the various aspects outlined in the map. The visual concept map of ‘nursing’ assists in the education and training of all categories of nurses in the profession, especially student nurses, aiming to support better patient outcomes when the concept of nursing is understood and interpreted in the same way.
Precious S. Motshabi, , Francois Watson
Published: 10 January 2022
Journal: Curationis
Abstract:
Background: Presence is a therapeutic skill that has a healing effect not only on the mental healthcare user but also the nurse. There was a need to explore nurses’ perceptions on factors that limit presence, especially in a public psychiatric hospital in a rural province such as North West, South Africa, where there are limited resources and nurses need to rely heavily on their therapeutic use of self. Objectives: To report on nurses’ perceptions of factors limiting presence when working in a public psychiatric hospital. Method: A qualitative descriptive inquiry was applied, with purposive sampling. Semistructured individual interviews were held with 10 nurses. Thematic data analysis was applied. Results: Intrapersonal factors that were found to limit presence arose from the view that mental healthcare users (MHUs) are difficult to engage with; the tendency to view ‘good care’ primarily as physical care with limited insight into presence was also recognised. Interpersonal and transpersonal factors related to difficulties in communicating with MHUs and in the work environment. Conclusion: Addressing factors that limit presence were found to require courage, the overcoming of interpersonal distance and a transformational process. Contribution: This article contributes important insights that can be used by nurse leaders to promote the practice of presence to improve the quality of psychiatric nursing care in developing contexts, such as a rural province in South Africa.
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