Aids Patient Care and Stds

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 10872914 / 15577449
Total articles ≅ 3,746

Latest articles in this journal

Emma R. Nedell, Michelle R. Fletcher, Marxavian D. Jones, Amulya Marellapudi, Cassie Grimsley Ackerley, ,
Published: 25 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0193

Abstract:
Half of all people living with HIV (PLWH) in the United States are not retained in HIV medical care. The utility of appointment reminders and clinic-based retention support services is often limited by the inability to contact PLWH who are out of care (PLWH-OOC) due to disconnected phone lines, full voice mails, and housing instability. Between June 2019 and May 2021, as part of a larger mixed-methods study in Metro Atlanta, Georgia, we conducted surveys with 50 PLWH-OOC and interviews with 13 PLWH holding a variety of clinic stakeholder roles (patients, Community Advisory Board members, and peer navigators) to explore preferences for clinic communication and peer outreach and factors impacting uptake. Although phone calls, text messages, and calling secondary contacts were most preferred, the spread of preferences was wide. Surveys and interviews highlighted the high acceptance of peer outreach visits, with trust, support, and privacy being key factors driving the uptake. Findings underscore the need for clinics to offer a suite of communication and outreach strategies and assess patient preferences for traditional and nontraditional outreach models to more effectively reach, re-engage, and ultimately retain PLWH-OOC.
, Jessica L. Montoya, Vanessa Serrano, Samantha Yeager, Dafna Paltin, Elizabeth C. Pasipanodya, Maria J. Marquine, Martin Hoenigl, Christian B. Ramers, John Kua, et al.
Published: 24 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0180

Abstract:
Black/African American communities continue to be disproportionately impacted by HIV with Black people with HIV (PWH) exhibiting poorer outcomes along the HIV treatment cascade. Psychosocial burden may, in part, explain these health disparities among PWH. We implemented a culturally adapted intervention (individualized Texting for Adherence Building [iTAB]) to improve ART adherence among 89 Black PWH in San Diego, CA. We aimed to (1) characterize psychosocial risk factors (depression, negative life events, discrimination, medical mistrust) hypothesized to be barriers to HIV outcomes among Black PWH and (2) determine if these factors influence intervention engagement, HIV outcomes, and self-reported physical and mental health. We identified three levels of psychosocial burden (low, moderate, high) through hierarchical cluster analysis. Participants in the high burden cluster (n = 25) experienced the highest levels of depression, negative life events, and discrimination, in addition to the poorest intervention outcomes, HIV outcomes, and physical and mental health compared to low and moderate burden clusters. Participants in the low (n = 29) burden cluster had less medical mistrust than the moderate (n = 34) and high burden clusters, but low and moderate clusters did not differ on any outcomes. Overall, self-reported ART adherence was 83%, which is above estimates of ART adherence in the Western region of the United States. The iTAB intervention shows promise in improving HIV-related outcomes among Black PWH with low to moderate psychosocial burden; however, additional supports may need to be identified for those with high psychosocial burden.
, LaRon E. Nelson, Mandy J. Hill, Darren Whitfield, S. Raquel Ramos, Samuel Akyirem, Lynda Emel, Leo Wilton, Lisa Hightow-Weidman, Steve Shoptaw, et al.
Published: 1 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds, Volume 37, pp 22-30; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0139

Abstract:
Autonomy support is a concept that is derived from self-determination theory. Autonomy refers to the freedom to act as one chooses. The current study aimed to examine if autonomy support was associated with dried blood spot validated pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) adherence, and whether the association was mediated by PrEP adherence goal setting and progress toward PrEP adherence goals. Our sample was drawn from Black men who have sex with men (MSM) from across three cities (Chapel Hill, NC; Los Angeles, CA; and Washington, DC) in the United States between February 2013 and September 2014. We used logistic regression to evaluate associations between study variables and path analysis to test mediation effects. Participants were, on average, 28 [standard deviation (SD) = 1.12] years old and 25% were unemployed. We found that MSM who experienced high autonomy support were more likely to adhere to PrEP [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.00–1.38]. MSM who set PrEP adherence goals were more likely to adhere to PrEP. Moreover, MSM who reported making progress toward their goals were also more likely to adhere to PrEP. Finally, client perception of coordination quality enhanced the magnitude of the association between goal setting and goal progress and the effect size of goal progress on PrEP adherence. Autonomy support, goal setting, goal monitoring/evaluation, and care coordination quality influenced PrEP adherence among Black MSM. Our findings indicate that while it is important to set goals for PrEP adherence, goal setting may need to be accompanied by progress monitoring to achieve the maximal effect.
, Miguel Pascual-Bernaldez, Alessandro Berni, Ahmed Hnoosh, Antonella Castagna, Peter Messiaen, Maria Jose Galindo Puerto, Mark Bloch, Eisuke Adachi, Gary Sinclair, et al.
Published: 1 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds, Volume 37, pp 53-59; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0168

Abstract:
Cabotegravir and rilpivirine long-acting (LA) antiretroviral therapy (ART) demonstrated similar safety and efficacy in maintaining viral suppression among participants switching from daily oral to LA ART in the Extension Phase of the FLAIR trial. The Phase IIIb SOLAR study comparing efficacy and safety of daily oral versus LA ART every 2 months allowed participants and health care providers (HCPs) to choose an oral lead-in (OLI) before LA initiation or proceed by immediately starting with injections (SWI). We conducted an online survey among SOLAR HCPs (n = 110) in 13 countries to assess reasons for choosing OLI versus SWI. Logistic regression was used to identify factors influencing this decision. Thirty-two percent of HCPs reported a future preference to use OLI, whereas 54% reported a future preference for SWI. HCPs had greater odds of reporting future intentions for SWI if they were from Continental Europe versus North America [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.83, p < 0.05], from sites with a greater number of participants who initiated LA ART without OLI (aOR: 1.56, p < 0.01), and those who reported comfort with the medication safety profile (aOR: 6.39, p < 0.01). HCPs who participated in LA ART trials before SOLAR had decreased odds of reporting a preference for SWI compared to those with no prior LA ART trial experience (aOR: 0.11; p < 0.01). Results indicated higher intentions to SWI over OLI among HCPs initiating participants on LA ART. A major factor associated with SWI was provider comfort with safety data, reinforcing the role of continued training regarding an SWI approach.
, Maria Tanveer, Juman Abdulelah Dujaili, Lay Hong Chuah, Furqan Khurshid Hashmi, Ahmed Awaisu
Published: 1 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds, Volume 37, pp 31-52; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0192

Abstract:
People living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS; PLWHA) frequently encounter antiretroviral (ARV) therapy-related problems. Clinical pharmacists with specialized training in ARV stewardship play an important role in managing these problems. However, there is a paucity of evidence to clarify the impact of clinical pharmacists' interventions on managing ARV therapy-related problems in PLWHA. Therefore, we aim to systematically review the literature to determine the nature and impact of pharmacists' interventions on managing medication-related problems in PLWHA. The review protocol was registered on International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO; CRD42020173078). Relevant records were identified from six electronic bibliographic databases (PubMed, Embase, EBSCOhost, ProQuest, Scopus, and the Cochrane Central Register) from their inception until September 2022. We included all randomized and nonrandomized interventional studies that were published in English. After the abstract and full-text screening, data were extracted from the selected studies, and the quality of the studies was assessed. The electronic database search and citation tracking identified two thousand and three citations. The review included 21 of these studies, involving 2998 PLWHA, published between 2014 and 2022. Pharmacists' interventions, working alone or in a multi-disciplinary team, comprised ARV medication review, management of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), therapeutic drug monitoring, prevention of drug interactions, and provision of drug information to PLWHA or the health care team. The pharmacist-involved interventions significantly reduced incorrect/incomplete ARV regimens, drug interactions, incorrect dosages, duplicate therapy, polypharmacy, administration errors, missing medication, wrong formulation, ADRs, and prescribing errors. Most studies reported that physicians usually accept more than 90% of the pharmacists' recommendations. ARV medication-related problems remain highly prevalent in PLWHA. Pharmacist-led interventions and stewardship significantly reduce ARV therapy-related problems in PLWHA and are widely accepted by physicians. Dedicated pharmacists with specialized training and credentialing in infectious diseases or HIV/AIDS have a great potential to improve health outcomes in PLWHA.
M. John Gill, Raynell Lang,
Published: 1 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds, Volume 37, pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0188

Abstract:
Unsuppressed HIV viremia damages immunity and increases the risk for secondary HIV transmission. Successful engagement of persons with HIV (PWH) into care resulting in viral suppression is vital. PWH already engaged in care, who, after achieving viral suppression, experience viral breakthrough episodes (VBEs) with a sequence of suppressed/unsuppressed/suppressed viral loads remain problematic. We examined the frequency and outcomes of PWH experiencing VBE. HIV care is provided at no cost to all patients under Alberta's universal health program. All PWH followed at Southern Alberta Clinic, Canada, with two or more viral load tests between January 1, 2010, and January 1, 2020, were evaluated. Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle variables were determined along with health outcomes (CD4 levels, HIV-related hospitalizations, and HIV/AIDS-related mortality). Descriptive and multi-variable analyses were performed comparing PWH with and without VBEs. Of 2096 PWH, 386 (18%) experienced one or more VBEs. A higher risk of VBEs was seen in adjusted analyses in those diagnosed age ≤40 years. Increased risk of VBE was seen with injection drug use (46%) and in heterosexuals (56%) compared with MSM. Experience of intimate partner violence, unstable housing, homelessness, and past incarceration also increased risks by 36%, 44% 79%, and 51%, respectively. PWH with VBEs experienced lower CD4 counts (median −417/mm3 vs. 576/mm3), higher rates of HIV-related hospitalizations (16% vs. 5%), and a 67% increased risk of death (95% confidence interval 1.17–2.39) over the study period. Nearly 20% of all PWH, after achieving viral suppression, experienced VBEs. Distinct clinical, lifestyle, and life experiences predict PWH at greatest risk for more than one VBEs. Serious negative health outcomes of VBEs were identified, suggesting that novel customized care programming is required for PWH at greatest risk.
, Ana Moreno, María J. Vivancos, Alfonso Muriel García, Ricardo Pelazas González, , Diana Corona Mata, Pepa Galindo, Sonia Calzado, José L. Casado, et al.
Published: 1 January 2023
Aids Patient Care and Stds, Volume 37, pp 11-21; https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2022.0183

Abstract:
Current guidelines recommend screening people with HIV (PWH) for bone disease using predictive tools developed for the general population, although data on PWH are scarce. In this study, we assessed the performance of FRAX and QFracture scoring systems to predict the occurrence of fragility fractures in a prospective cohort of 17,671 adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) included in the HIV/AIDS research network (CoRIS) in Spain. The survival estimates of fragility fractures during follow-up were calculated and FRAX and QFracture scores were computed at cohort inclusion. For both tools, discriminatory measures and the observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios were assessed. During a follow-up time of 42,411.55 person-years, 113 fragility fractures were recorded. Areas under the curve were 0.66 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.61–0.71] for FRAX and 0.67 (95% CI 0.62–0.73) for QFracture for major osteoporotic fractures, and 0.72 (95% CI 0.57–0.88) and 0.81 (95% CI 0.68–0.95) for hip fracture, respectively. The O/E was 1.67 for FRAX and 5.49 for QFracture for major osteoporotic fractures, and 11.23 for FRAX and 4.87 for QFracture for hip fractures. Moreover, O/E raised as the risk increased for both tools and in almost all age groups. When using the recommended assessment thresholds, <6% and 10% of major osteoporotic and hip fractures would have been identified, respectively. In conclusion, FRAX and QFracture displayed acceptable discrimination, although both tools significantly underestimated the risk of fragility fractures in PWH. The recommended assessment thresholds may not be appropriate for this population as they were unable to identify individuals with fragility fractures during follow-up.
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