Biopreservation and Biobanking

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 19475535 / 19475543
Total articles ≅ 1,121

Latest articles in this journal

, Zartasha Zafar, Muhammad S. Ansari, Shamim Akhter, Saima Qadeer, Ali Akhter, Kainat Waseem, Julian Santiago-Moreno
Published: 18 January 2023
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.0029

Abstract:
Aims: Bacterial contamination may occur in feces during collection and processing of semen. Bacteria not only compete for nutrients with spermatozoa but also produce toxic metabolites and endotoxins and affect sperm quality. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of antibiotic supplementation on the sperm quality of Indian red jungle fowl, estimation and isolation of bacterial species and their antibiotic sensitivity. Materials and Methods: Semen was collected and initially evaluated, diluted, and divided into six experimental extenders containing gentamicin (2.5 μg/mL), kanamycin (31.2 μg/mL), neomycin (62.5 mg/mL), penicillin (200 U/mL), and streptomycin (250 μg/mL), and a control having no antibiotics were cryopreserved and semen quality was evaluated at post-dilution, post-cooling, post-equilibration, and post-thawing stages (Experiment 1). A total aerobic bacterial count was carried out after culturing bacteria (Experiment 2) and subcultured for antibiotic sensitivity (Experiment 3). Results: It was shown that penicillin-containing extender improved semen quality (sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability, and acrosomal integrity) compared with the control and other extenders having antibiotics. The bacteria isolated from semen were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus spp., and Bacillus spp. Antibiotic sensitivity results revealed that E. coli shows high sensitivity toward neomycin, kanamycin, and penicillin. Staphylococcus spp. shows high sensitivity toward streptomycin, neomycin, and penicillin. Bacillus spp. shows high sensitivity toward kanamycin and penicillin. Conclusions: It was concluded that antibiotics added to semen extender did not cause any toxicity and maintained semen quality as that of untreated control samples, and penicillin was identified as most effective antibiotic. It is recommended that penicillin can be added to the semen extender for control of bacterial contamination without affecting the semen quality of Indian red jungle fowl.
Zahra Farrokhi, , Maryam Hezavehei, Ali Torabi, Maryam Shahverdi, Shaban Rahimi
Published: 13 January 2023
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.0135

Abstract:
Semen banking is an efficient method of artificial insemination for commercial breeders. However, the cryopreservation process induces severe damages to plasma membranes, which lead to reduced fertility potential of thawed sperm. The replacement of membrane lipids with oxidized membrane lipids repairs the cell membrane and improves its stability. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of glycerophospholipid (GPL) nanomicelles on the cryosurvival of thawed rooster semen. Semen samples were collected from six 29-week Ross broiler breeder roosters, then mixed and divided into five equal parts. The samples were diluted with the Beltsville extender containing different concentrations of GPL according to the following groups: 0 (GPL-0), 0.1% (GPL-0.1), 0.5% (GPL-0.5), 1% (GPL-1), and 1.5% (GPL-1.5), then diluted semen was gradually cooled to 4°C during 3 hours and stored in liquid nitrogen. The optimum concentration of GPL was determined based on the quality parameters of thawed sperm. Our results showed sperm exposed to GPL-1 had significantly increased motion parameters and mitochondrial activity. The percentages of viability and membrane integrity were significantly higher in the GPL-1, and GPL-1.5 groups compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). Moreover, the lowest rate of apoptosis and lipid peroxidation were observed in the GPL-1 and GPL-1.5 groups in comparison with the frozen control group. Our findings indicated that membrane lipid replacement with GPL nanomicelles (1% and 1.5%) could substitute for damaged lipids in membranes and protect sperm cells against cryoinjury.
, Stephanie J. Weinstein, Paul S. Albert, Amanda Black, Michelle Brotzman, Norma A. Diaz-Mayoral, Nicole Gerlanc, Wen-Yi Huang, Joshua N. Sampson, Alaina Shreves, et al.
Published: 9 January 2023
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.0053

Abstract:
Introduction: Sample handling can influence biomarker measurement and introduce variability when combining data from multiple studies or study sites. To inform the development of blood collection protocols within a multisite cohort study, we directly quantified concentrations of 54 biomarkers in blood samples subjected to different handling conditions. Materials and Methods: We obtained serum, lithium heparin plasma, and EDTA plasma from 20 adult volunteers. Tubes of chilled whole blood were either centrifuged and processed within 2 hours of collection (the “reference standard”) or were stored with cool packs for 24 or 48 hours; centrifuged before and/or after this delay; or collected in tubes with/without gel separators. We used linear mixed models with random intercepts to estimate geometric mean concentrations and relative percent differences across the conditions. Results: Compared to the reference standard tubes, concentrations of many biomarkers changed after processing delays, but changes were often small. In serum, we observed large differences for B vitamers, glutamic acid (37% and 73% increases with 24- and 48-hour delays, respectively), glycine (12% and 23% increases), serine (16% and 27% increases), and acetoacetate (−19% and −26% decreases). Centrifugation timing and separator tube use did not affect concentrations of most biomarkers. Conclusion: Sample handling should be consistent across samples within an analysis. The length of processing delays should be recorded and accounted for when this is not feasible.
Published: 28 December 2022
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.29115.ack

Abstract:
Biopreservation and Biobanking
Published: 19 December 2022
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.0041

Abstract:
Background: Parallel to the rapid advancement of biological and information technologies, the role and forms of biobank research have been constantly changing. The ethical, legal, and social implications of consent in biobank research are in a state of flux. This study aimed to clarify current Japanese public preferences regarding the consent model and explore how public attitudes are determined. Methods: We conducted an online, population-based quantitative survey among Japanese residents aged between 20 and 69 years. Statistical analyses consisted of univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Of the 1580 respondents, 60.9% preferred autonomy-based consent (specific or dynamic consent) and 23.9% preferred broad-type consent (opt-out or broad consent). Marital status, gender, and privacy concerns were significantly associated with the preference for a consent model. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated the public's current preference for autonomy-based consent, including dynamic consent. However, our findings also revealed that approximately half of the respondents considered broad consent as somewhat preferable.
Published: 13 December 2022
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.0081

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of both pure rainbow trout seminal plasma (RTSP) supplementation and RTSP-cysteine combination on cryopreservation success and post-thaw incubation resilience of ram semen in the nonbreeding season. For this purpose, different doses of RTSP (0%, 1%, 10%, and 15%) with or without cysteine supplementation were used for experiments. Ejaculates chosen for experiments were pooled and then divided into eight equal volumes for grouping (Control-ControlC, RTSP1-RTSP1C, RTSP10-RTSP10C, and RTSP15-RTSP15C). After cryopreservation, frozen-thawed semen samples were incubated for 5 hours at 37°C for determination of post-thaw incubation resistance. Motility, HOST, TUNEL, Rh123-PI, and CTC tests were performed at 0 hour and 3rd and 5th hours of post-thaw incubation to evaluate the efficacy of all experimental groups. The RTSP10 and RTSP10C groups were noted to provide the best protection on motility, plasma membrane integrity, DNA integrity, and mitochondrial function of cryopreserved ram semen. On the other hand, the best protection against cryo-capacitation was observed in RTSP15 and RTSP15C groups. The addition of cysteine was found to be effective when the higher (15%) or lower (1%) doses of RTSP were used, as well as for no use of RTSP.
, David R. Chafin
Published: 13 December 2022
Biopreservation and Biobanking; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.0108

Abstract:
Objectives: This work investigates whether changes in a biospecimen's molecular composition from formaldehyde fixation drive changes in the mid infrared (MID-IR) spectrum. Our ultimate goal was to develop an analytical metrology that could be used to accurately determine the fixation time of a tissue sample as a surrogate to overall tissue quality. Methods: Multiple unstained formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples were scanned with an MID-IR microscope to identify a molecular fingerprint of formaldehyde fixation. The fixation specific patterns were then mined to develop a predictive model. A multiple tissue experiment using greater than 100 samples was designed to train the algorithm and validate the accuracy of predicting fixation status. Results: We present data that formaldehyde crosslinking results in alterations to multiple bands of the MID-IR spectra. The impact was most dramatic in the Amide I band, which is sensitive to the conformational state of proteins. The spectroscopic fixation signature was used to train a machine-learning model that could predict fixation time of unknown tissues with an average accuracy of 1.4 hours. Results were validated by histological stain quality for bcl-2, FOXP3, and ki-67. Further, two-dimensional imaging was used to visualize the spatial dependence of fixation, as demonstrated by multiple features in the tissue's vibrational spectra. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that it is possible to predict the fixation status of tissues for which the preanalytics are unknown. This novel capability could help standardize clinical tissue diagnostics and ensure every patient gets the absolutely best treatment based on the highest quality tissue sample.
Clare M. Allocca, Lalita Wadhwa, Piper Mullins, Cheryl Michels, Yaffa Rubinstein, Suenne Orth, Andy Zaayenga, Suzanne Vercauteren
Published: 1 December 2022
Biopreservation and Biobanking, Volume 20, pp 577-578; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.29113.cja

Abstract:
Biopreservation and Biobanking
Marianna J. Bledsoe
Published: 1 December 2022
Biopreservation and Biobanking, Volume 20, pp 471-472; https://doi.org/10.1089/bio.2022.29114.editorial

Abstract:
Biopreservation and Biobanking
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