Journal of Women's Health

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 15409996 / 1931843X
Total articles ≅ 4,039

Latest articles in this journal

, Simona Fumagalli, Sofia Galimberti, Alice Margherita Ornago, Valentina Brivio, Laura Lambicchi, Antonella Nespoli, Patrizia Vergani
Published: 3 February 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0278

Abstract:
Purpose: Little is known on the potential effects of abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) among low-risk, healthy pregnant women with no comorbidities or gestational complications. We investigated perinatal outcomes of these pregnancies according to GWG as per the 2009 National Academy of Medicine (NAM) recommendations. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of low-risk pregnant women giving birth at term between January 2016 and December 2020. Inclusion criteria were normal pregestational body mass index (pBMI) (18.5–24.9 kg/m2) and no pregestational or gestational complication. Self-reported prepregnancy weight was used to calculate pBMI; GWG was the difference between maternal weight at childbirth and prepregnancy weight. Women were classified according to the 2009 NAM guidelines for GWG: insufficient (iGWG, 16 kg). Logistic regression analysis with aGWG as referent was performed to independently estimate dose–response associations. Results: During the study period, there were 4,127 (33.1%) births fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Fifty-two percent of women gained outside the recommended range: 33.5% had iGWG and 18.7% had eGWG. iGWG women were 40% more likely to have early-term births and small for gestational age neonates. In turn, eGWG women displayed increased odds of prolonged pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.32), cesarean section in labor (aOR 1.50), high-degree perineal tears (aOR 2.04), postpartum hemorrhage ≥1,000 mL (aOR 1.54), and large for gestational age newborns (aOR 1.83). Conclusion: Our data show that abnormal GWG independently associates with heightened risk of adverse outcomes among healthy, low-risk pregnant women with normal pBMI and no comorbidity or gestational complication.
, Kelly Karavolos, Yanyu Zhang, Elizabeth Avery, Imke Janssen, Mary Farhi, Siobán D. Harlow, Howard M. Kravitz
Published: 3 February 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0211

Abstract:
Objectives: Research has shown a link between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and lower urinary tract and sexual disorders in clinical settings. We examined whether CSA was associated with two specific aspects of high tone, elevated resting tension pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) in community-dwelling women. Materials and Methods: Data were from 2068 participants (25.5% Black, 9.6% Chinese, 10.8% Japanese, 5.0% Hispanic, and 49.1% Non-Hispanic White) in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multirace/multiethnic longitudinal observational study of women's midlife health. At baseline, enrolled women were 42–52 years old and premenopausal or early perimenopausal. Annual or biennial assessments conducted over 20 years (1996 through 2017) included single-item queries about urgency urinary incontinence and pain with sexual activity used to assess PFD outcomes. The 12th follow-up visit conducted in 2009–2011 assessed the primary exposure, history of CSA, using a single-item response. Multivariate logistic regression models tested study objectives. Results: The prevalence of CSA was 15%, self-reported in 313/2068 women. CSA and PFD, both pain with sexual activity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56 confidence interval [95% CI = 1.12–2.18]) and urgency urinary incontinence (OR = 1.87 [95% CI = 1.29–2.71]), were significantly associated in unadjusted models. The final adjusted model that included sociodemographic variables and physical and behavioral risk factors was significant for pain with sexual activity (OR = 1.48 [95% CI = 1.08–2.02]), but not for urgency urinary incontinence (OR = 1.38 [95% CI = 0.96–1.98]). Conclusions: In midlife women, pain with sex, but not urgency urinary incontinence, was associated with a history of CSA. A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach to PFD is key, inclusive of CSA screening.
Shin Hashiramoto, Tadatsugu Kinjo, Suguru E. Tanaka, Wataru Arai, Miho Shimada, Kyota Ashikawa, , Oki Yuji, Nana Yara, Yoshino Kinjyo, et al.
Published: 31 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0440

Abstract:
Background: One of the major risks of preterm birth is a history of conization. However, the risk of infection due to this procedure is still not well known. Using next-generation sequencing, we aimed to reveal the influence of conization on vaginal microbiota in the following pregnancy, and their relationship between spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study including 133 pregnant patients, of whom 25 had conization histories and 108 did not. Vaginal microbiome samples were collected using swabs by an obstetrician upon inclusion in the first trimester and during delivery. V1–V2 of the 16S rRNA gene were amplified and analyzed to identify the bacteria. Results: The conization group had a significantly lower delivery week (34 weeks vs. 36 weeks, p = 0.003) and higher sPTB rate (64% vs. 8.3%, p ≤ 0.001) than the control group. In the conization group, alpha (Chao 1, p = 0.02; phylogenetic diversity whole tree, p = 0.04) and beta diversity (permutational multivariate analysis of variance test, p = 0.04) of the vaginal microbiota was significantly higher during delivery in patients who delivered preterm than in those who delivered term. Community-state type IV in the first trimester was significantly associated with sPTB (overall odds ratio 3.80, 95% confidence interval 1.33–10.8, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Conization is a risk factor for sPTB. Increased risk of sPTB in patients after conization may belong to the vulnerable defense mechanism, due to the shortened cervix and decreased cervical mucus.
, Taylor R. Church, Marlene P. Freeman, Peter Gaccione, Phoebe S. Caplin, Lauren A. Kobylski, Miranda Arakelian, Ella T. Rossa, David Chitayat, Sonia Hernández-Díaz, et al.
Published: 30 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0310

Abstract:
Background: Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), also called atypical antipsychotics, are common therapies for women with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders. No systematically ascertained human reproductive safety data are available for lurasidone, and prospective data for quetiapine are limited, making decisions regarding use of these medications during pregnancy complicated. Materials and Methods: The National Pregnancy Registry for Psychiatric Medications is a prospective cohort study designed to collect reproductive safety data relative to SGAs. Pregnant women aged 18–45 years, with psychiatric illness and prenatal psychotropic medication exposure completed three phone interviews during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Cases of presumed malformations are abstracted from medical records for adjudication by a teratologist blinded to medication exposure. Results: Of 2,293 women enrolled at the time of analysis, 134 in the lurasidone group, 264 in the quetiapine group, and 886 controls completed the postpartum interview and were therefore eligible for inclusion. Dropped or lost-to-follow-up participants (13%) and those currently pregnant were excluded. Participants were predominantly White, college-educated, and married (lurasidone = 88.1%, 76.9%, 77.6%; quetiapine = 89.8%, 71.2%, 75.0%; controls = 92.7%, 86.7%, 89.1%). Absolute risks of major malformations were 2.19% (lurasidone), 1.85% (quetiapine), and 1.77% (controls). Odds ratios comparing lurasidone and quetiapine with controls were 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36–4.32) and 1.04 (95% CI = 0.38–2.85), respectively. Conclusions: No specific patterns of malformations were observed in infants exposed to the medications of interest. Lurasidone and quetiapine did not appear to be major teratogens, but further information is needed to refine risk estimates. Food and Drug Administration guidance underscores the importance of pregnancy registries. Clinical trial number: NCT01246765.
Mandana Masoumirad, S. Marie Harvey, Linh N. Bui, Jangho Yoon
Published: 30 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0308

Abstract:
Objectives: We compared the use of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services for Medicaid-enrolled women of reproductive age (WRA) living in Oregon by urban/rural status and examined the effect of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion on the use of SRH services for these women. Methods: We linked Oregon Medicaid enrollment files and claims for the years 2008–2016 to identify 392,111 WRA. Outcome measures included receipt of five key SRH services. The main independent variables were urban/rural status (urban, large rural cities, and small rural towns) and an indicator for the post-Medicaid expansion time period (2014–2016). We performed (conditional) fixed-effects logistic regression and multiple-group interrupted time-series analyses. Results: Women living in small rural towns were less likely than women living in urban areas to receive well-woman visits (odds ratio [OR] = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] [0.80–0.94]), sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening (OR = 0.81; 95% CI [0.72–0.90]), and pap tests (OR = 0.91; 95% CI [0.84–0.99]). Women living in large rural cities were less likely than women living in urban areas to receive STI screening (OR = 0.91; 95% CI [0.84–0.98]). Following the implementation of ACA Medicaid expansion, the average number of all five SRH services increased for all women. With the exception of contraceptive services, the average number of SRH services examined increased more for urban women than for women living in small rural towns. Conclusions: Although Medicaid expansion contributed to increased use of SRH services for all WRA, the policy was unsuccessful in reducing disparities in access to SRH services for WRA living in rural areas compared with urban areas.
Future of Sex and Gender Medicine Working Group, Deborah Gomez Kwolek, Saralyn Mark, Akshara Ramasamy, Maya Behn, Sneha Chaturvedi, Jeanna M. Qiu, Aarushi Bute, Rhea Kaw, Kopal Kumar, et al.
Published: 20 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0503

Solène Gouesbet, , Carolina Riveros, Élise Diard, Isabelle Pane, Zélia Goussé-Breton, Michelle Valenti, Marie Gabillet, Camille Garoche, Philippe Ravaud, et al.
Published: 19 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0323

Abstract:
Background: Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological condition that affects about 10% of women of reproductive age. Despite its prevalence, diagnosis is often delayed, misdiagnosis is common, and treatment options are poor. This study aimed at capturing ideas to improve endometriosis care from the patients' perspectives. Materials and Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,000 adult patients in ComPaRe-Endometriosis (a French prospective e-cohort focused on endometriosis) who answered to the open-ended question: “If you had a magic wand, what would you change about your health care?”. The free-text responses were analyzed by qualitative thematic analysis using an inductive approach. Results: Patients had a mean age of 34.1 years (standard deviation = 8.1); 56% and 42% had stage IV disease or deep endometriosis, respectively. They elicited 2,487 ideas to improve the management of endometriosis, which were categorized into 61 areas of improvement, further grouped into 14 themes. The top five areas of improvement were mentioned by >10% of the patients and were to (1) train caregivers to develop their knowledge on the disease, (2) provide better management of daily pain and pain attacks, (3) take patient-reported symptoms seriously, (4) standardize diagnostic processes to improve early detection, and (5) have caregivers listen more to the patients. Conclusions: We identified 61 areas for improvement in endometriosis care. These results reflect patients' expectations in terms of management of their disease and will be useful to design a better global care for endometriosis from the patients' perspectives.
, Daniel Wojdyla, Pietro Bortoletto, Kathryn Terry, Emily Disler, Ankrish Milne, Antonio Gargiulo, John Petrozza, Olga Brook, Serene Srouji, et al.
Published: 13 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0133

Abstract:
Objective: To compare 12-month post-treatment health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and symptom severity (SS) changes among patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids (SUF) not seeking fertility and undergo a hysterectomy, abdominal myomectomy (AM), or uterine artery embolization (UAE). Materials and Methods: The Comparing Options for Management: Patient-Centered Results for Uterine Fibroids (COMPARE-UF) Registry is a multi-institutional prospective observational cohort study of patients treated for SUF. A subset of 1465 women 31–45 years of age, who underwent either hysterectomy (n = 741), AM (n = 446), or UAE (n = 155) were included in this analysis. Demographics, fibroid history, and symptoms were obtained by baseline questionnaires and at 1 year post-treatment. Results were stratified by all treatments and propensity score weighting to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics. Results: Women undergoing UAE reported the lowest baseline HR-QoL and highest SS scores (mean = 40.6 [standard deviation (SD) = 23.8]; 62.3 [SD = 24.2]) followed by hysterectomy (44.3 [24.3]; 59.8 [SD = 24.1]). At 12 months, women who underwent a hysterectomy experienced the largest change in both HR-QoL (48.7 [26.2]) and SS (51.9 [25.6]) followed by other uterine-sparing treatments. Propensity score weighting revealed all treatments produced substantial improvement, with hysterectomy patients reporting the highest HR-QoL score (92.0 [17.8]) compared with myomectomy (86.7 [17.2]) and UAE (82.6 [21.5]) (p < 0.0001). Similarly, hysterectomy patients reported the lowest SS scores (8.2 [15.1]) compared with myomectomy (16.5 [15.1]) and UAE (19.6 [17.5]) (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: All procedures showed improvement in HR-QoL and reduction in SS score at 12 months, hysterectomy showing maximum improvement. Of importance, at 12 months, patients who underwent either a myomectomy or UAE reported comparable symptom relief and HR-QoL. Clinicaltrials.Gov Identifier: NCT02260752.
Audrey A. Keim, Melissa N. Pelkey, , Tarrah A. Folley, Molly B. Kraus, Jillian A. Maloney, Natalie H. Strand, Lopa Misra
Published: 13 January 2023
Journal of Women's Health; https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2022.0532

Abstract:
Background: Although women and men have matriculated into medical schools in similar proportions since the 1980s, recent data indicate that anesthesiology is lagging in gender equity, especially in academic leadership roles.1,2 As promotion in academic medicine is strongly influenced by publications, understanding whether a lack of women authorship is contributing to this gender gap is crucial.3,4 This article aims to assess how woman authorship trends have changed in the last 16 years, including during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The five highest impact journals in anesthesia were identified as Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Anesthesiology, PAIN, and Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. Number of total authors, including women, men, and unknown gender authors as well as incidence of woman first and/or last author, was documented from articles published in 2005, 2010, 2015, 2020, and 2021. Results: This analysis shows that women are gaining representation in anesthesia publications. Overall, there was a statistically significant increase in the total number of women authors and women first and last authorship. However, as of 2021, women still only represented ∼40% of total and first authors and ∼24% of last authors. In addition, increase in first/last woman authorship was not present in all journals when stratified. Conclusion: These journal differences may suggest the editorial evaluation process as a potential source of gender bias. There was a statistically significant relationship between women senior authors and articles with 50% or more women authors, indicating that woman mentorship is contributing to closing equity gap. These data present a starting point for further investigations into gender disparities within anesthesia to continue the forward progression for women in academic medicine.
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