Biochemical Society symposium

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 00678694 / 17441439
Published by: Portland Press Ltd.
Total articles ≅ 821

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 81-93; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740081

Abstract:
PH (pleckstrin homology) domains represent the 11th most common domain in the human proteome. They are best known for their ability to bind phosphoinositides with high affinity and specificity, although it is now clear that less than 10% of all PH domains share this property. Cases in which PH domains bind specific phosphoinositides with high affinity are restricted to those phosphoinositides that have a pair of adjacent phosphates in their inositol headgroup. Those that do not [PtdIns3P, PtdIns5P and PtdIns(3,5)P2] are instead recognized by distinct classes of domains including FYVE domains, PX (phox homology) domains, PHD (plant homeodomain) fingers and the recently identified PROPPINs (b-propellers that bind polyphosphoinositides). Of the 90% of PH domains that do not bind strongly and specifically to phosphoinositides, few are well understood. One group of PH domains appears to bind both phosphoinositides (with little specificity) and Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) family small G-proteins, and are targeted to the Golgi apparatus where both phosphoinositides and the relevant Arfs are both present. Here, the PH domains may function as coincidence detectors. A central challenge in understanding the majority of PH domains is to establish whether the very low affinity phosphoinositide binding reported in many cases has any functional relevance. For PH domains from dynamin and from Dbl family proteins, this weak binding does appear to be functionally important, although its precise mechanistic role is unclear. In many other cases, it is quite likely that alternative binding partners are more relevant, and that the observed PH domain homology represents conservation of structural fold rather than function.
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 9-22; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740009

Abstract:
The IP3R [IP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) receptor] is responsible for Ca2+ release from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). We have been working extensively on the P400 protein, which is deficient in Purkinje-neuron-degenerating mutant mice. We have discovered that P400 is an IP3R and we have determined the primary sequence. Purified IP3R, when incorporated into a lipid bilayer, works as a Ca2+ release channel and overexpression of IP3R shows enhanced IP3 binding and channel activity. Addition of an antibody blocks Ca2+ oscillations indicating that IP3R1 works as a Ca2+ oscillator. Studies on the role of IP3R during development show that IP3R is involved in fertilization and is essential for determination of dorso-ventral axis formation. We found that IP3R is involved in neuronal plasticity. A double homozygous mutant of IP3R2 (IP3R type 2) and IP3R3 (IP3R type 3) shows a deficit of saliva secretion and gastric juice secretion suggesting that IP3Rs are essential for exocrine secretion. IP3R has various unique properties: cryo-EM (electron microscopy) studies show that IP3R contains multiple cavities; IP3R allosterically and dynamically changes its form reversibly (square form-windmill form); IP3R is functional even though it is fragmented by proteases into several pieces; the ER forms a meshwork but also forms vesicular ER and moves along microtubules using a kinesin motor; X ray analysis of the crystal structure of the IP3 binding core consists of an N-terminal beta-trefoil domain and a C-terminal alpha-helical domain. We have discovered ERp44 as a redox sensor in the ER which binds to the luminal part of IP3R1 and regulates its activity. We have also found the role of IP3 is not only to release Ca2+ but also to release IRBIT which binds to the IP3 binding core of IP3R.
Kristy A. Horan, Megan V. Astle, Lisa M. Ooms,
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 161-81; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740161

Abstract:
Phosphoinositide signals regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeletal rearrangement and intracellular trafficking. Hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, by inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases regulates synaptic vesicle recycling (synaptojanin-1), hematopoietic cell function [SHIP1(SH2-containing inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase-1)], renal cell function [OCRL (oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe)] and insulin signalling (SHIP2). We present here a detailed review of the characteristics of the ten mammalian 5-phosphatases. Knockout mouse phenotypes and underexpression studies are associated with significant phenotypic changes, indicating non-redundant roles, despite, in many cases, overlapping substrate specificity and tissue expression. The extraordinary complexity in the control of phosphoinositide signalling continues to be revealed.
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 211-21; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740211

Abstract:
Among the many derivatives of the inositol-based signalling family are a subgroup that possess diphosphates. In this review, some recent research into the actions of these specialized polyphosphates is analysed, and key goals for future studies are identified, which, it is hoped, will result in the wider cell-signalling community giving considerably greater attention to this intriguing but relatively neglected class of inositol polyphosphates.
Susan Hayes, Akira Hayakawa, Deborah Leonard, David Lambright,
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 95-105; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740095

Abstract:
The FYVE domain is an approx. 80 amino acid motif that binds to the phosphoinositide PtdIns3P with high specificity and affinity. It is present in 38 predicted gene products within the human genome, but only in 12-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Eight of these are highly conserved in all three organisms, and they include proteins that have not been characterized in any species. One of these, WDFY2, appears to play an important role in early endocytosis and was revealed in a RNAi (RNA interference) screen in C. elegans. Interestingly, some proteins contain FYVE-like domains in C. elegans and D. melanogaster, but have lost this domain during evolution. One of these is the homologue of Rabatin-5, a protein that, in mammalian cells, binds both Rab5 and Rabex-5, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5. Thus the Rabatin-5 homologue suggests that mechanisms to link PtdIns3P and Rab5 activation developed in evolution. In mammalian cells, these mechanisms are apparent in the existence of proteins that bind PtdIns3P and Rab GTPases, such as EEA1, Rabenosyn-5 and Rabip4u27. Despite the comparable ability to bind to PtdIns3P in vitro, FYVE domains display widely variable abilities to interact with endosomes in intact cells. This variation is due to three distinct properties of FYVE domains conferred by residues that are not involved in PtdIns3P head group recognition: These properties are: (i) the propensity to oligomerize, (ii) the ability to insert into the membrane bilayer, and (iii) differing electrostatic interactions with the bilayer surface. The different binding properties are likely to regulate the extent and duration of the interaction of specific FYVE domain-containing proteins with early endosomes, and thereby their biological function
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 223-46; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740223

Abstract:
Several of the nine hexahydroxycylohexanes (inositols) have functions in Biology, with myo-inositol (Ins) in most of the starring roles; and Ins polyphosphates are amongst the most abundant organic phosphate constituents on Earth. Many Archaea make Ins and use it as a component of diphytanyl membrane phospholipids and the thermoprotective solute di-L-Ins-1,1'-phosphate. Few bacteria make Ins or use it, other than as a carbon source. Those that do include hyperthermophilic Thermotogales (which also employ di-L-Ins-1,1'-phosphate) and actinomycetes such as Mycobacterium spp. (which use mycothiol, an inositol-containing thiol, as an intracellular redox reagent and have characteristic phosphatidylinositol-linked surface oligosaccharides). Bacteria acquired their Ins3P synthases by lateral gene transfer from Archaea. Many eukaryotes, including stressed plants, insects, deep-sea animals and kidney tubule cells, adapt to environmental variation by making or accumulating diverse inositol derivatives as 'compatible' solutes. Eukaryotes use phosphatidylinositol derivatives for numerous roles in cell signalling and regulation and in protein anchoring at the cell surface. Remarkably, the diradylglycerol cores of archaeal and eukaryote/bacterial glycerophospholipids have mirror image configurations: sn-2,3 and sn-1,2 respectively. Multicellular animals and amoebozoans exhibit the greatest variety of functions for PtdIns derivatives, including the use of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 as a signal. Evolutionarily, it seems likely that (i) early archaeons first made myo-inositol approx. 3500 Ma (million years) ago; (ii) archeons brought inositol derivatives into early eukaryotes (approx. 2000 Ma?); (iii) soon thereafter, eukaryotes established ubiquitous functions for phosphoinositides in membrane trafficking and Ins polyphosphate synthesis; and (iv) since approx. 1000 Ma, further waves of functional diversification in amoebozoans and metazoans have introduced Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor Ca2+ channels and the messenger role of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3.
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 59-67; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740059

Abstract:
The NADPH oxidase complex of neutrophils and macrophages is an important weapon used by these cells to kill microbial pathogens. The regulation of this enzyme complex is necessarily complicated by the diverse receptor types that are needed to trigger its activation and also the tight control that is required to deliver this activation at the appropriate time and place. As such, several signalling pathways have been established to regulate the NADPH oxidase downstream of cell surface receptors. Central amongst these are PI3K- (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-dependent pathways, blockade of which severely limits activation of the oxidase to several soluble and particulate stimuli. The precise roles of the phosphoinositide products of PI3K activity in regulating NADPH oxidase assembly and activation are still unclear, but there is emerging evidence that they play a key role via regulation of guanine nucleotide exchange on Rac, a key component in the oxidase complex. There is also very strong evidence that the PI3K products PtdIns(3,4)P2 and PtdIns3P can bind directly to the PX (Phox homology) domains of the core oxidase components p47phox and p40phox respectively. However, the significance of these interactions in terms of membrane localization or allosteric consequences for the oxidase complex remains to be established.
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 259-271; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740259

Abstract:
PtdIns is synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum and its intracellular distribution to other organelles can be facilitated by lipid transfer proteins [PITPs (phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins)]. In this review, I summarize the current understanding of how PITPs are regulated by phosphorylation, how can they dock to membranes to exchange their lipid cargo and how cells use PITPs in signal transduction and membrane delivery. Mammalian PITPs, PITPα and PITPβ, are paralogous genes that are 94% similar in sequence. Their structural design demonstrates that they can sequester PtdIns or PtdCho (phosphatidylcholine) in their hydrophobic cavity. To deliver the lipid cargo to a membrane, PITP has to undergo a conformational change at the membrane interface. PITPs have a higher affinity for PtdIns than PtdCho, which is explained by hydrogen-bond contacts between the inositol ring of PtdIns and the side-chains of four amino acid residues, Thr59, Lys61, Glu86 and Asn90, in PITPs. Regardless of species, these residues are conserved in all known PITPs. PITP transfer activity is regulated by a conserved serine residue (Ser166) that is phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Ser166 is only accessible for phosphorylation when a conformational change occurs in PITPs while docking at the membrane interface during lipid transfer, thereby coupling regulation of activity with lipid transfer function. Biological roles of PITPs include their ability to couple phospholipase C signalling to neurite outgrowth, cell division and stem cell growth.
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740001

Abstract:
InsP3 has two important functions in generating Ca2+ oscillations. It releases Ca2+ from the internal store and it can contribute to Ca2+ entry. A hypothesis has been developed to describe a mechanism for Ca2+ oscillations with particular emphasis on the way agonist concentration regulates oscillator frequency. The main idea is that the InsP3 receptors are sensitized to release Ca2+ periodically by cyclical fluctuations of Ca2+ within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Each time a pulse of Ca2+ is released, the luminal level of Ca2+ declines and has to be replenished before the InsP3 receptors are resensitized to deliver the next pulse of Ca2+. It is this loading of the internal store that explains why frequency is sensitive to external Ca2+ and may also account for how variations in agonist concentration are translated into changes in oscillation frequency. Variations in agonist-induced entry of external Ca2+, which can occur through different mechanisms, determine the variable rates of store loading responsible for adjusting the sensitivity of the InsP3 receptors to produce the periodic pulses of Ca2+. The Ca2+ oscillator is an effective analogue-to-digital converter in that variations in the concentration of the external stimulus are translated into a change in oscillator frequency.
Published: 1 December 2007
Biochemical Society symposium, Volume 74, pp 247-57; https://doi.org/10.1042/bss0740247

Abstract:
Generation of PA (phosphatidic acid) by PLD (phospholipase D)-catalysed hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine plays a pivotal role in cellular signalling pathways that regulate organization of the actin cytoskeleton, vesicular transport and exocytosis and stimulation of cell growth and survival. PLD regulation and function are intimately linked with phosphoinositide metabolism. Phosphatidyl 4-phosphate 5-kinase is stimulated by PA in vitro and this enzyme is the downstream effector of a significant subset of PLD signalling pathways. Yeast and mammalian PLDs are potently and specifically activated by the product of this kinase, PtdIns(4,5)P2, through interactions mediated by a polybasic motif within the catalytic core of the enzyme. Integrity of this motif is critical for agonist activation of mammalian PLD and for PLD function in secretion, sporulation and exocytosis in vivo. Although dispensable for catalysis in vitro, these PLD enzymes also contain N-terminal PH (pleckstrin) and PX (phox) homology domains. Binding studies using recombinantly expressed PLD fragments indicate that the PH and PX domains also interact specifically with distinct phosphoinositide ligands. Both the PX and PH domains are important for PLD function by controlling the dynamic association of the enzyme with the plasma membrane and its intracellular trafficking by the endocytic pathway. These results identify two distinct modes of regulation of PLD by phosphoinositides: stimulation of catalysis mediated by the polybasic domain and dynamic regulation of membrane targeting mediated primarily by the PH and PX domains.
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