Industrial Biotechnology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 15509087 / 19318421
Total articles ≅ 1,067

Latest articles in this journal

Hanley Coyle, Karen Wawrousek
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 358-365; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.0025

Abstract:
The oleaginous bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 accumulates triacylglycerides (TAGs), from which the fatty acid components can be converted to biodiesel. In this work, we demonstrate the simple, robust bioconversion of the agricultural byproduct molasses desugarized solubles (MDS), a co-product of the second and final extraction of sugar from sugar beets, to fatty acids suitable for biodiesel production. In 48 hours of batch culture, R. opacus PD630 grown in dilute MDS accumulates 3.01 g/L dry biomass that is 43% fatty acids, with simultaneous growth and lipid accumulation. Palmitic (C16:0), cis-10-heptadecanoic (C17:1), and oleic (C18:1n9) acids are most abundant, representing 30%, 19%, and 18% of total fatty acids, respectively. Lowering the growth temperature causes a shift toward saturated fatty acids, as palmitic (C16:0), stearic (C18:0), and margaric (C17:0) are most prevalent. Analysis of MDS, rich in organic acids, revealed that aspartic and glutamic acids were preferentially consumed, leaving some sucrose, lactic acid, and malic acid in solution. This simple bioconversion process of an agricultural byproduct, which requires no added nutrients or buffers, could provide a robust platform for larger scale production of biodiesel precursors.
IB Editorial Staff
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 325-331; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.29292.rco

Pramod Chaudhari
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 338-340; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.29296.pch

Sunil Chandran
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 334-337; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.29293.sch

Rebecca Coons
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 323-324; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.29295.rco

Sameer Ranjan Sahoo, , Rohit Pritam Das, Lipsa Leena Panigrahi, Manoranjan Arakha
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 351-357; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.0027

Abstract:
This study set out to see if using 33 Khz ultrasonic frequency for Bacillus subtilis increases biomass and metabolite synthesis. Increased oxygen and nutrient delivery to cells is assumed to be the cause of the rise in biomass on surfaces and in suspension. Although ultrasonic loss of cells is undesirable, some cell removal or death may be tolerated if the accelerated rate of cell growth exceeds the rate of cell removal. Bacillus sp. was selected as the test isolates because members of this gram-positive genus are known to be industrially relevant bacteria. Ultrasound was used to accelerate growth of Bacillus subtilis cells. When compared to growth without ultrasound, low-frequency ultrasound (33 kHz) was found to accelerate cell development. Ultrasonic exposure over a shorter amount of time (up to 30 min) not only increased planktonic development of the bacterial cells, but also increased protease synthesis to 121.5 g/mL from 95 g/mL. (60 min). It is believed to promote cell growth by improving the transport of oxygen, nutrients, and waste materials within and out of cells.
Leonardo Ribeiro Bernardo,
Published: 1 December 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 341-350; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.0030

Abstract:
The search for active metabolites present in plants is of great value and has been an important source of bioactive substances for centuries. Sakuranetin, first identified in the bark of cherry trees (Prunus spp.), is a flavonoid of the flavanone subclass, acting as a phytoalexin essential for the plant defense system. The present work aims to describe the state art of sakuranetin, including physical properties, biological effects, and biotechnological trends. An investigation was carried out in the Elsevier Scopus database to understand the main aspects regarding the contributions of sakuranetin to publications reporting its biological effects. Currently, several biological activities are related to it, the most relevant being the antiviral, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antiparasitic, and antibiotic. The anti-inflammatory activity is the leading and most cited biological activity related to sakuranetin, and another exciting capacity is cancer cell proliferation inhibition shown over several cell cultures. Sakuranetin is already known for microbial defense of plants and antiparasitic against Leishmania species was reported, as was virostatic and virucidal characteristics for human viruses, including SARS-COV-2. Due to limitations of the flavonoid molecular characteristics, sakuranetin needs to be implemented in new technologies, and nanoencapsulation techniques are presented as an alternative for enhancing sakuranetin features. More studies are necessary to harness all of the biological potential of sakuranetin in our society.
Rina Singh
Published: 1 October 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 281-285; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.29288.rsi

Eduardo Luís Menezes de Almeida, Igor De Albuquerque Vassalli, Paulo Cesar da Silva Pereira Junior, Mayara Salgado Silva, Weyder Cristiano Santana,
Published: 1 October 2022
Industrial Biotechnology, Volume 18, pp 314-321; https://doi.org/10.1089/ind.2022.0028

Abstract:
For mead production, honey wort must be supplied with nitrogen to avoid slow or stuck fermentations or the production of undesirable flavor compounds. However, supplementation needs vary depending on wort composition and yeast strain, and studies involving the supplementation of honey wort are rare, and there are no studies on recovery from fermentative failures through late supplementation. Thus, honey wort at 25.5°Brix was supplemented with di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) or ammonium sulfate (AS) either 1) exclusively in the wort at 0.7 g/L; 2) after 14 days (0.3 g/L); or 3) in the wort and after 14 days, at 0.7 and 0.3 g/L, respectively, and fermentation was carried out during 26 d by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae JP14. Non-supplemented wort resulted in failed fermentation, and late nitrogen addition partially recovered the process. Nitrogen addition at both stages improved yeast performance, which allowed the production of meads with higher concentrations of ethanol. Volatiles' production was also improved when nitrogen was added, especially when AS was the source. Wort early supplementation generated meads with higher concentrations of isobutyl alcohol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate and 1-propanol, and lower 2-phenyl ethanol; the latter was not affected by late supplementation. It was evident that the timing for nitrogen addition, besides the nitrogen source, significantly affected ethanol and volatile synthesis during mead production. Therefore, nitrogen sources and the strategy used for their addition can be used to control the chemical profile and sensory quality of meads.
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