American Journal of Public Health

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 00900036 / 15410048
Total articles ≅ 23,211

Latest articles in this journal

Alexander Senturia, Isabelle Howerton, Emily Uyeda Kantrim, Vanessa Evans, Tiffany Malluche, Jonni Miller, Miriam Gonzalez, Brooke Robie, Chelsea L. Shover, Alicia H. Chang, et al.
American Journal of Public Health; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307147

Abstract:
People experiencing homelessness (PEH) have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, yet their vaccination coverage is lower than is that of the general population. We implemented a COVID-19 vaccination program that used evidence-based and culturally tailored approaches to promote vaccine uptake and equity for PEH in Los Angeles County, California. From February 2021 through February 2022, 33 977 doses of vaccine were administered at 2658 clinics, and 9275 PEH were fully vaccinated. This program may serve as a model for future service delivery in vulnerable populations. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print December 1, 2022:e1–e5. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.307147)
Madeleine I.G Daepp, Asta Roseway, Scott Counts
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1765-1773; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307068

Abstract:
Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy of a novel, real-time sensor network for routine monitoring of racial and economic disparities in fine particulate matter (PM2.5; particulate matter ≤ 2.5 µm in diameter) exposures at the neighborhood level. Methods. We deployed a dense network of low-cost PM2.5 sensors in Chicago, Illinois, to evaluate associations between neighborhood-level composition variables (percentage of Black residents, percentage of Hispanic/Latinx residents, and percentage of households below poverty) and interpolated PM2.5. Relationships were assessed in spatial lag models after adjustment for all composition variables. Models were fit with data both from the overall period and during high-pollution episodes associated with social events (July 4, 2021) and wildfires (July 23, 2021). Results. The spatial lag models showed that racial/ethnic composition variables were associated with higher PM2.5 levels. Levels were notably higher in neighborhoods with larger compositions of Hispanic/Latinx residents across the entire study period and notably higher in neighborhoods with larger Black populations during the July 4 episode. Conclusions. As a complement to sparse regulatory networks, dense, low-cost sensor networks can capture spatial variations during short-term air pollution episodes and enable monitoring of neighborhood-level inequities in air pollution exposures in real time. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(12):1765–1773. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.307068 )
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1693-1695; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307128

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Using Low-Cost Sensor Networks: Considerations to Help Reveal Neighborhood-Level Exposure Disparities, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
Chenoa D. Chenoa D. Allen PhD Affiliation Chenoa D. Allen is with the School of Health Professions, University of Missouri, Columbia.
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1726-1728; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307132

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) The Cruel Public Health Consequences of Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1732-1734; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307122

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) The Harmful Impacts of Anti-Immigrant Policies on Maternal and Child Health, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
Joanne Rosen, Lainie Rutkow
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1757-1764; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307090

Abstract:
Objectives. To systematically identify and analyze US state-level legislation concerning people who were undocumented during the COVID-19 pandemic, from January 2020 through August 2021. Methods. Using standard public health law research methods, we searched Westlaw’s online database between November 2021 and January 2022 to identify legislation addressing COVID-19 and people who were undocumented. We abstracted relevant information, analyzed the data, and identified primary themes for each bill and resolution. Results. Sixty-six bills and resolutions, from 13 states, met the inclusion criteria. Legislation addressed 5 primary themes: eligibility and access to health-related services (n = 16), health and personal information (n = 10), housing assistance (n = 13), job security and employment benefits (n = 14), and monetary assistance (n = 13). Conclusions. Approximately one quarter of state legislatures introduced bills or resolutions regarding people who were undocumented and COVID-19. State-level laws are an important tool to mitigate the disproportionate impact of public health emergencies on vulnerable groups. Public Health Implications. As states shift attention away from the exigencies of COVID-19, this research provides insight into how law might be used to protect those who are undocumented throughout the full cycle of future public health emergencies. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(12):1757–1764. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2022.307090 )
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307123

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Butler and Nichols Respond, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1808-1808; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.112.12.1808

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Subscription Form, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
Stephanie Stephanie Bonne MD Affiliation Stephanie Bonne is the Chief of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ.
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1705-1706; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307124

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Promoting Evidence-Based Policy Solutions to the US Gun Violence Epidemic, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba, Diana B. Cutts
American Journal of Public Health, Volume 112, pp 1735-1737; https://doi.org/10.2105/ajph.2022.307098

Abstract:
American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) from the American Public Health Association (APHA) Immigrant-Inclusive Policies Promote Child and Family Health, an article from American Journal of Public Health, Vol 112 Issue 12
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