Public Performance & Management Review

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 15309576 / 15579271
Published by: Informa UK Limited
Total articles ≅ 847

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 24 November 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2145569

Abstract:
To examine empirically whether the effect of the incentives on individual performance lasts even after the incentive cutbacks, this study analyzed the change in journal publications associated with the pay-for-performance incentives in a Korean university in which the trend of performance-based financial incentives took a reversed U-shape. The panel data on the research performance of 310 professors from the humanities and social sciences field collected over 14 years showed that increased financial incentives had a lasting effect on increasing publications in domestic journals, even when the incentives were shrinking. By contrast, following the curtailed incentives, the publications in international journals (SSCI- and A&HCI-listed journals) were reduced at the same rate as they surged when the incentives had increased. In interpreting the different responses resulting from diverse skills required for publications in each type of journal, we proposed that the right combination of performance-based incentives, autonomy-supportive atmosphere, and perceived likelihood of achieving the desired goals would result in longstanding behavioral changes and improved research performance. This study also suggested that a theory of sustainable behavioral change should consider the role of skill development in linking internalizing values and sustaining changing behaviors.
Published: 23 November 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2148260

Abstract:
Whether organizational performance shapes government resource allocations or not has long been a contentious issue, especially since the 1990s when the New Public Management movement vitalized performance-based budgeting across countries. To contribute to this ongoing debate, this study examines if different levels of organizational performance achievement affect annual budget changes, focusing on Washington State’s public programs from 2006 to 2015. This study finds a significant relationship between program performance and budget changes, particularly during fiscally hard times. The findings also suggest the reward mechanism associated with performance-based resource allocation, indicating that higher program performance may lead to budget increases.
, Danika Pieters, , Bjorn Kleizen, Stéphanie Verlinden, Koen Verhoest
Published: 18 November 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-27; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2123836

Abstract:
The extraordinary measures taken to constrain infections with the coronavirus may have altered the known psychological processes preventing stress and strain in the public workplace. We use survey data of a large public organization in Belgium to look at the capacity of affective organizational commitment, perceived job autonomy, and workplace social support to buffer the impact of Covid-19 measures on work strain. We find a negative effect of perceived job autonomy on stress resulting from Covid-19 measures. We find no support for the buffering effect of affective organizational commitment and workplace social support on employee strain induced by Covid-19 measures.
Published: 3 November 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-28; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2137211

Abstract:
This article examines vaccination and vaccine hesitancy during the COVID-19 pandemic by focusing on the role of altruism and distrust in government across different job sectors. Using the Household Pulse Survey, a nationally representative and near real-time dataset administered by the United States Census Bureau, our findings suggest that there is a clear difference in vaccine take-up and vaccine hesitancy across job sectors. We find that government and nonprofit employees are more likely to receive vaccines and, if not vaccinated yet, are less vaccine-hesitant than private-sector employees. Additionally, motivations behind vaccine hesitancy, particularly altruism and distrust in government, varied according to one’s sector affiliation. Government and nonprofit employees, compared to private employees, were more likely to be vaccine hesitant for altruistic motivations. Differences in government distrust across sectors bore unexpected results, as we found no difference between government and private employees, while nonprofit employees were less likely to be vaccine hesitant due to government distrust. We discuss the implications and contributions of this article and suggest future agenda for COVID-19 research and sector comparison literature.
Published: 31 October 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-27; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2137212

Abstract:
The public sector is increasingly collaborating with the private sector in the development of large-scale public infrastructure projects. However, the difficulties arising due to working across organizational boundaries are often detrimental to project performance. This article argues that boundary-spanning activities can enhance the quality of collaboration and subsequently the performance of projects. Boundary spanners utilize relational governance mechanisms and undertake conscious endeavors for building interorganizational relationships by engaging in activities, such as coordination and communication with the stakeholders. The data for this study are composed of 158 survey responses from lead public managers involved in Dutch national public infrastructure projects. The data are analyzed using structural equation modeling. The study demonstrates that the quality of collaboration has a significant impact on the performance of the project during the implementation phase. Further, we find that the different boundary-spanning activities are interconnected and that they have a significant positive relationship on project performance, with a mediating effect of collaboration. The study concludes that, and shows how boundary spanners are vital to the collaborative processes through which public infrastructure projects are implemented.
Published: 20 October 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-32; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2127806

Abstract:
Previous research has neglected the moderating role of the environment in studying the negative effect of public service motivation (PSM) on unethical behavior. This article investigates whether this effect prevails under group pressure and competition for economic resources. Moreover, it assesses whether these moderating effects can be counterbalanced by activating public values. Using a survey experiment on a sample of citizens in Catalonia (Spain), the results suggest that PSM is vulnerable to group pressure and that the proposed activation of public values does little to neutralize this effect. The discussion addresses the findings and provides directions for future research.
Published: 14 October 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-23; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2132520

Abstract:
Local governments consistently face challenges of economic depression and the unexpected events that precipitate them, such as COVID-19. The depressions leave governments taxed for resources, infrastructure, and time. These depressions are often helped by large infusions of federal grant dollars, otherwise known as stimulus-oriented granting. Key variables in determining success in spending these stimulus dollars include government structure and different forms of capacity. These are traditionally tested characteristics that governments already possess. What we know less about is how governments take advantage of these spending opportunities without regard to the resources that are under their control. This is referred to as entrepreneurial orientation. Using the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), this study tests the effect of entrepreneurial orientation, form of government, and capacity on local government spending of federal grant dollars, specifically in stimulus-oriented granting. This study has implications for other stimulus-oriented granting, such as the COVID-19-motivated, Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES).
Published: 12 October 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-24; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2128833

Abstract:
This study investigates in the healthcare sector how occupation influences the relationship between organizational procedural justice and employees’ trust in the supervisor and in the organization. Drawing on the dual hierarchy model in professional bureaucracies, we adopt a multi-level approach and pay close attention to the influence of the occupational group and its immediate organizational context. Our results from five healthcare organizations reveal that the relationship between organizational procedural justice and trust in the organization is mediated by employees’ trust in the supervisor for both health professionals and support staff. On the occupational group level, occupation type predicts organizational procedural justice and trust in the organization, but not trust in the supervisor. Based on these findings, we insist that communication between occupation groups deserves more attention for building trust in professional bureaucracies.
Published: 10 October 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-25; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2130946

Abstract:
Many cities around the world have adopted digital technologies to combat COVID-19, but they have experienced varying degrees of success. This research developed an analytical framework involving the components of “preparation”, “praxis”, and “paradox” regarding a city’s leveraging of digital infrastructure for pandemic governance. Then, the case of Hangzhou is employed to illustrate this framework. This research finds that (1) the application of digital technologies should be a systematic arrangement based on institutional and technological preparations, (2) innovative governance instruments supported by digital infrastructure can be developed to respond to a variety of practical scenarios, and (3) adopting a paradox lens aids in mitigating potential negative socio-economic consequences. This research suggests that leveraging digital infrastructure for pandemic governance requires a coherent system that has the potential to aid cities around the world in better managing public health crises going forward.
Published: 23 September 2022
Public Performance & Management Review pp 1-27; https://doi.org/10.1080/15309576.2022.2124296

Abstract:
Policies adopted to curb the spread of COVID-19 impose limits on individual freedom and although some citizens have consistently supported containment policy, others have resisted. Beyond political orientation, however, little research has explored the attitudinal basis of support for stringent virus containment policy. We argue that individuals with high levels of public service motivation (PSM) will more readily accept the sacrifices entailed by containment policy and thereby express stronger support for it. Second, we argue that the positive relationship between PSM and containment policy support is both mediated by trust in government and moderated by bureaucratic personality, the latter denoting a favorable orientation towards rules in general. Using a country-wide sample of 568 South Korean citizens collected in the fall of 2021, we estimate a conditional process model of support for COVID-19 policy stringency. We find that PSM has both a direct and indirect relationship with support via trust in government and that the indirect effect is moderated by bureaucratic personality, though not in the expected direction. We also report the results of a post hoc analysis which suggests interesting differences in how individuals evaluate rules that limit individual versus organizational freedom.
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