The Biochemist

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 0954982X / 17401194
Published by: Portland Press Ltd.
Total articles ≅ 2,116

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 31 October 2022
Journal: The Biochemist
The Biochemist, Volume 44, pp 5-8; https://doi.org/10.1042/bio_2022_127

Abstract:
Electrospray ionization (ESI), for which John Fenn was awarded a share of the 2002 Nobel Prize in chemistry, has revolutionized the use of mass spectrometry for biological and clinical applications. Developed in the late 1980s, building on the pioneering experiments by Malcom Dole’s lab, John Fenn et al. demonstrated the use of ESI for the ‘soft ionization’ of biologically important ‘molecular elephants’, allowing high molecular weight biopolymers (i.e., proteins) to be analysed by mass spectrometry. Here we describe the principles and mechanisms of ESI. Using the field of proteomics, we provide illustrations of how ESI has underpinned discoveries in this field for decades and is enabling emerging methods even today.
Zuzana Osifová
Published: 31 October 2022
Journal: The Biochemist
The Biochemist, Volume 44, pp 16-18; https://doi.org/10.1042/bio_2022_132

Abstract:
The Biochemical Society identifies and celebrates outstanding science communication talent in molecular biosciences with its annual Science Communication Prize. Zuzana Osifová (Charles University, Czech Republic) won the first prize in the 2022 written category with her entry, ‘Meanwhile in an anorexic mind’.
Iris Floria
Published: 29 October 2022
Journal: The Biochemist
The Biochemist, Volume 44, pp 13-15; https://doi.org/10.1042/bio_2022_133

Abstract:
The Biochemical Society identifies and celebrates outstanding science communication talent in molecular biosciences with its annual Science Communication Prize. Iris Floria (University of Glasgow, UK) won 3rd Prize in the 2022 written category with her entry, ‘Microbial predators: an unlikely ally’.
Published: 27 October 2022
Journal: The Biochemist
The Biochemist, Volume 44, pp 2-4; https://doi.org/10.1042/bio_2022_130

Abstract:
This year marks the 20th anniversary of Koichi Tanaka securing the Nobel Prize in chemistry, shared with John Fenn and Kurt Wüthrich, for demonstrating the applicability of laser technology to analyze biological macromolecules. The principle of laser desorption is fundamental for many of today’s analytical methods such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). In this article, we provide an overview of MALDI and highlight the power, versatility and range of applications within the biochemistry community.
Gintarė Lübeck, Michael K. Seery,
Published: 26 October 2022
Journal: The Biochemist
The Biochemist, Volume 44, pp 21-26; https://doi.org/10.1042/bio_2022_123

Abstract:
Pedagogical practices can influence students’ confidence and ability beliefs and affect their ambition to persevere in science. Given the continuing need to diversify science and retain students in scientific programmes, science education must be tailored to cater to the needs of varied student groups. Since early experience in university programmes can be decisive in determining students’ further academic and professional choices, pedagogies employed in undergraduate science courses can be particularly influential in supporting science careers. Undergraduate science instructors are therefore encouraged to consider their approaches to teaching and learning from a variety of perspectives that could help empower students from under-represented groups.
Published: 18 October 2022
Journal: The Biochemist
The Biochemist, Volume 44, pp 9-12; https://doi.org/10.1042/bio_2022_125

Abstract:
Infertility and development of contraceptive methods have profound societal affects; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying this are still largely unknown. Here, we describe how using the small worm Caenorhabditis elegans has helped us to discover the genes involved in these processes. Nobel Laureate Sydney Brenner established the nematode worm C. elegans as a genetic model system with a powerful ability to discover genes in many biological pathways through mutagenesis. In this tradition, many labs have been using the substantial genetic tools established by Brenner and the ‘worm’ research community to discover genes required for uniting sperm and egg. Our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of the fertilization synapse between sperm and egg rivals that of any organism. Genes have been discovered in worms that share homology and mutant phenotypes with mammals. We provide an overview of the state of our understanding of fertilization in worms as well as exciting future directions and challenges.
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