Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 15212491 / 15383660
Total articles ≅ 1,937

Latest articles in this journal

Levi G. Ledgerwood, Steven Tinling, Craig Senders, Annjoe Wong-Foy, Harsha Prahlad,
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 413-418; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.696

Abstract:
Background Current management of permanent facial paralysis centers on nerve grafting and muscle transfer; however, limitations of those procedures call for other options. Objectives To determine the durability and biocompatibility of implanted artificial muscle in a gerbil model and the degree of inflammation and fibrosis at the host tissue–artificial muscle interface. Methods Electroactive polymer artificial muscle (EPAM) devices engineered in medical-grade silicone were implanted subcutaneously in 13 gerbils. The implanted units were stimulated with 1 kV at 1 Hz, 24 h/d via a function generator. Electrical signal input/output was recorded up to 40 days after implantation. The animals were euthanized between 23 and 65 days after implantation, and the host tissue–implant interface was evaluated histologically. Results The animals tolerated implantation of the EPAM devices well, with no perioperative deaths. The muscle devices created motion for a mean of 30.3 days (range, 19-40 days), with a mean of 2.6 × 106 cycles (range, 1.6 × 106 to 3.5 × 106 cycles). Histologic examination of the explanted devices revealed the development of a minimal fibrous capsule surrounding the implants, with no evidence of bacterial infection or inflammatory infiltrate. No evidence of device compromise, corrosion, or silicone breakdown was noted. Conclusions Artificial muscle implanted in this short-term animal model was safe and functional in this preliminary study. We believe that EPAM devices will be a safe and viable option for restoration of facial motions in patients with irreversible facial paralysis.
, Minas Constantinides
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 423-428; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.665

Abstract:
Objective To determine whether rhinoplasty improves subjective and objective nasal patency. Design Retrospective study including subjective breathing scores and acoustic rhinometry before and 6 to 9 months after septorhinoplasty among a cohort of 31 patients. We used a paired t test to analyze the difference between preoperative and postoperative values. Setting Academic medical center. Patients Patients undergoing septorhinoplasty with potassium titanyl phosphate laser turbinate reduction at a single institution. Results The mean subjective breathing scores improved significantly, with an overall improvement of 38%. The overall mean volume increased and the overall resistance decreased, but the changes were significant only on the right side. The minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) did not change, but the distance of the MCA of the nasal cavity moved anteriorly by 0.23 cm on the left side. The patients were stratified into subsets based on other procedures undergone, including spreader grafts and alar batten grafts, and on the absence of osteotomies. These groups had similar results. In patients with severe obstruction, all measured values improved more than any other subgroup, including the MCA, which improved significantly by an average of 55%. Patients with normal preoperative MCA values did not experience any significant changes except for an anterior shift in MCA. Conclusions Septorhinoplasty increases nasal volume, decreases nasal resistance, and advances the MCA anteriorly. These changes coexist with subjective improvements in nasal patency, which suggests that this new anatomic configuration creates a positive outcome on nasal airflow. Spreader grafts do not increase the MCA significantly. Patients with preoperative severe obstruction have the best overall improvement, whether measured subjectively or objectively.
, William R. Schmitt, Randall K. Roenigk, Eric J. Moore,
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 419-422; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.662

Abstract:
Objective To describe the novel use of an external tissue expander in the reconstruction of scalp and forehead defects. Methods A prospective review was performed on 7 patients who underwent extirpation of head and neck malignant neoplasms resulting in scalp and forehead defects. Reconstruction was performed using an external tissue expander device. Patient clinical factors, defect size, and photographs were collected. Results Seven patients had large scalp and forehead defects ranging in greatest dimension from 5.0 ×4.0 to 8.0 ×7.0 cm. The external tissue expander was in place for 6 to 14 days, reducing the defect sizes by 50% to 99%. At the time of device removal, primary closure was achieved in 5 patients. One patient required bilateral advancement rotation flaps, and 1 patient healed by second intention. One patient with a history of scalp irradiation and diabetes had partial skin loss after device removal and required reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap. There were no other postoperative complications, wound breakdown, or device failures. Conclusion External tissue expansion is a safe and effective technique for closing large scalp and forehead defects that would otherwise require skin grafting or free flap reconstruction.
, Zachary M. Soler, Paul L. Leong, Ashley Murphy, Tom D. Wang, Ted A. Cook
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 437-441; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.583

Abstract:
Objective To evaluate the incidence of infection and extrusion of porous high-density polyethylene (pHDPE) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) implants used in rhinoplasty at a high-volume, academic facial plastic surgery practice. Methods A total of 662 rhinoplasty procedures performed by 3 faculty surgeons from 1999 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, operative details, and postoperative course findings were collected from patient records. Results The incidence of postoperative infection was 2.8% (19 of 662 patients). In each case of infection, alloplastic material had been used. Infections occurred in 1 in 5 rhinoplasty procedures in which pHDPE implants were used. In patients in whom ePTFE was used alone, the infection rate was 5.3%. Exposure developed in 12% of patients in whom an alloplast was used during surgery. Factors notably not associated with infection on bivariate analysis included sex, surgeon, purpose of procedure (functional vs cosmetic), current tobacco use, or history of cocaine use (> .05 for all). Conclusions To our knowledge, this study represents the largest evaluation of the use of pHDPE implants in rhinoplasty to date. Our findings are in contrast to those of previous studies regarding the use of pHDPE in rhinoplasty and parallel to those regarding the use of ePTFE. Caution is strongly recommended when considering the use of pHDPE in rhinoplasty.
Sami P. Moubayed, Frederick Duong, Christian Ahmarani,
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 403-407; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.510

Abstract:
Objective To describe a novel method to locate the malar eminence using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT), and a new axis system for evaluation of malar eminence symmetry. Methods A retrospective case series was carried out in 42 disease-free white adult patients. The 3D-CT reconstructions of the face were obtained, and the soft-tissue maxillozygion was used to locate the malar eminence. Other skeletal and soft-tissue landmarks (frontozygomatic suture, zygion, and orbitale) were evaluated. A patient-oriented axis system was constructed using 3 sagittal midline landmarks (nasion, subspinale, and basion). Coordinates were obtained for each landmark, and symmetry was evaluated. Results Twenty-one men and 21 women with mean ages of 41.1 and 41.3 years, respectively, were included. The malar eminence was easily localized using the 3D-CT technique for soft-tissue maxillozygion identification. Clinical asymmetry at the level of the soft-tissue maxillozygion was 40.5% (95% CI, 25.0%-56.0%). Other landmarks showed a prevalence of clinical asymmetry ranging from 24.0% to 50.0%. Conclusions The malar eminence can be easily and precisely located using the 3D-CT soft-tissue maxillozygion landmark. A reliable patient-oriented axis system can be defined using nasion, subspinale, and basion. The prevalence of malar eminence asymmetry in our study was 40.5%.
Justin C. Cohen, Steven J. Pearlman
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 456-461; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.429

Abstract:
We describe our experience with radix augmentation during cosmetic rhinoplasty over an 8-year period using both autologous and synthetic grafts and provide insight into maximizing success. We discuss various surgical considerations, including patient selection, graft materials, and dealing with complications. We focus on our operative technique and provide patient examples.
Audrey E. Ahuero, Bryan J. Winn, Bryan S. Sires
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 408-412; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.388

Abstract:
Objective To report a refinement of small-incision external levator advancement with a standardized method for suture placement for correction of acquired blepharoptosis and 1 surgeon's results with this technique. Methods Retrospective medical record review of data from all patients with unilateral or bilateral acquired blepharoptosis who underwent small-incision external levator advancement from October 1, 2007, through January 31, 2011. Results Ninety-two eyelids from 66 patients with acquired blepharoptosis were treated with small-incision external levator advancement with uniform suture placement. Forty patients underwent unilateral surgery and 26 underwent bilateral surgery. The mean preoperative margin-to-reflex distance was 0.70 mm. The mean postoperative margin-to-reflex distance was 2.95 mm. Symmetry was achieved in 49 patients (74%) on the basis of a less than 1-mm difference in margin-to-reflex distance. When stratified by unilateral ptosis repair vs bilateral ptosis repair, bilateral ptosis repair achieved greater symmetry on average (81% vs 70%). Nine patients underwent revision. There were only 2 postoperative complications: one was postoperative upper eyelid bleeding and the other was exposure keratopathy. Conclusion The simplified method of suture placement for small-incision external levator advancement is an effective, safe, and efficient option for acquired ptosis correction.
Wayne F. Larrabee
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.1029

Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 451-455; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.494

Abstract:
Numerous methods have been used for dorsal augmentation in reconstructive and aesthetic rhinoplasty. The Tasman technique is a method for dorsal augmentation using diced cartilage solidified by tissue sealant. This article describes the author's early experience using the Tasman technique and offers some helpful suggestions to surgeons who might wish to use this unique method of preparing a cartilaginous graft.
Garrett R. Griffin, Waleed Abuzeid, Jeffrey Vainshtein, Jennifer C. Kim
Published: 1 November 2012
Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 14, pp 395-402; https://doi.org/10.1001/archfacial.2012.422

Abstract:
Facial paralysis has enormous implications that have an impact on daily routines and quality of life. From a functional standpoint, facial paralysis results in paralytic lagophthalmos, ectropion, epiphora, ipsilateral nasal obstruction, and oral incompetence. Even more debilitating is the loss of facial symmetry and emotive expression, which are so integral to daily human communication and interaction. Over the past 4 decades, considerable progress has been made in the surgical interventions for facial paralysis, and we are now able to reliably protect the eye and reanimate the face.
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