Sa Journal of Industrial Psychology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 02585200 / 20710763
Published by: AOSIS Open Journals
Total articles ≅ 1,173

Latest articles in this journal

Xander Van Lill, Gerda Van der Merwe
Published: 29 November 2022
Sa Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.2045

Abstract:
Orientation: The 360-degree performance assessments are frequently deployed. However, scores by different performance reviewers might erroneously be aggregated, without a clear understanding of the biases that are inherent to different rating sources. Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are conceptual and mean score differences between self- and managerial-ratings on performance dimensions. Motivation for the study: Combining self- and managerial-ratings may lead to incorrect decisions about the development, promotion, and/or remuneration of employees. Understanding the effects of rating sources may aid thoughtful decisions about the applications of self- versus managerial-ratings in low- and high-stakes decisions. Research approach/design and method: A cross-sectional design was implemented by asking 448 managers to evaluate their subordinates’ performance, and 435 employees to evaluate their own performance. The quantitative data were analysed by means of multi-group factor analyses and robust t-tests. Main findings: There was a satisfactory degree of structural equivalence between self- and managerial-ratings. Practically meaningful differences emerged when the means of self- and managerial-ratings were compared. Practical/managerial implications: It might be meaningful to uncouple self- and managerial-ratings, when providing performance feedback. Managerial ratings might be a more conservative estimate, which could be used for high-stakes decisions, such as remuneration or promotion. Contribution/value-add: This study is the first to investigate the effect of rating sources on a generic model of performance in South Africa. It provides valuable evidence regarding when different rating sources should be used in predictive studies, performance feedback, or high-stakes talent decisions.
, Liudmila Shahova,
Published: 23 November 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1870

Abstract:
Orientation: Mediation is becoming an increasingly popular conciliatory procedure, which makes it possible to increase the psychological protection of parties in disputes in educational, social environment and legal practice. Research purpose: To develop and empirically confirm the model of mediators’ professional competencies to determine the features of mediators’ professional competencies and personal characteristics in the conciliation procedure with varying degrees of success. Motivation for the study: Today, the profession of mediator is becoming increasingly popular; however, there is not enough information in scientific literature about the issues of specialists’ professional suitability to training and experience, desirable personality traits and competencies. Research approach/ design and method: A total of 103 mediators from the Russian Arkhangelsk region took part in the study. Research methods include psychological testing using Bardin and Presnov’s ‘11 personality factors’, Costa and McCray’s Five-Factor Personality Questionnaire adapted by Bodunov and Biryukov and questioning (the author’s self-assessment questionnaire of mediators’ professional competencies). Statistical processing was carried out using descriptive statistics, correlation (Pearson’s χ2), multivariate variance and stepwise multiple regression analysis using the SPSS 23 software package. Main findings: The mediators’ professional competence model includes communication, conflict management, problem analysis, planning and self-control. A self-assessment questionnaire for mediators’ professional competencies, which can be used by the 360-degree method, has been developed and tested. A conclusion was made that the success of a conciliation procedure is influenced by such personal qualities as self-control, communication, curiosity and morality. From the list of mediators’ professional qualities, compiled by the authors, the following ones directly influence the success of mediation: activity, specificity, openness, poise, organisation, responsibility and communication skills. Practical/managerial implications: It is necessary to provide additional support for novice mediators, because this will facilitate more active involvement in activities, conduct more conciliation process and subsequently lead to increased success. Contribution/value-add: The developed questionnaire for assessing professional competencies will help in the training and selection of mediators. It will allow us to highlight what key and specific competencies of the mediator hinder the achievement of a successful result in the rehabilitation procedure and require development.
, Andries Masenge
Published: 23 November 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1926

Abstract:
Orientation: The absence of a scale to assess the academic self-directedness of adult learners in South African open, distance and e-learning milieus. Research purpose: This article describes the further validity and reliability assessment of the Adult Learner Self-Directedness Scale (ALSDS), which assesses adult learners’ academic self-directedness in an open, distance and e-learning (ODeL) university in South Africa. An initial validity and reliability study yielded a four-factor scale with 35 items loading onto it, while this study reports on a three-factor scale with 15 items loading onto it. Motivation for the study: Factors such as socio-economic conditions and past education practices make South African open, distance and e-learning higher education (ODeLHE) challenging for socio-economically disadvantaged students. The growing trend of online tuition and assessment in South African universities requires research into strategies that may improve a student’s success and throughput. In ODeLHE, student self-directedness may contribute to academic success, and thus a reliable scale is needed to assess it. Currently, there is no such South African scale. Research approach/design and method: A quantitative, cross-sectional research design was implemented, using self-report data from the students of the College of Economic and Management Sciences at a South African ODeL university. The ALSDS comprises three factors: success orientation for ODeLHE (self-efficacy beliefs), active academic behaviour (learner agency) and use of strategic resources (learning context management). Main findings: The findings indicate that the ALSDS appears to be a valid, internally consistent and reliable scale suitable for assessing ODeLHE adult learners’ academic self-directedness. Further research is, however, required to establish metric and scalar invariance. Practical/managerial implications: The scale may provide a reliable starting point for developing a scale for assessing ODeLHE students’ existing academic self-directedness. Knowledge of existing self-directedness capacity may be useful in designing and implementing holistic learner support programmes. Contribution/value-add: The ALSDS may provide a reliable Afrocentric starting point for developing a measure for assessing the academic self-directedness of South African ODeLHE students.
Published: 15 November 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1957

Abstract:
Orientation: Working from home eliminated the work–nonwork divide. The lives of employees at home were instantaneously connected to their engagement and productivity at work. The mechanisms and pathways through which an individual’s access to and management of nonwork resources and demands influence behaviours and outcomes at work have been scantily investigated. Research purpose: Hinged primarily on the conservation of resources theory, the study examined the influence of the external support, nonwork demands and resources on work engagement and employee productivity. Motivation for the study: Understanding how work–nonwork resources and demands interact(ed) to shape behaviour and outcomes in the work domain could shape cross-domain resource conservation and enhancement efforts. Research approach/design and method: Data were collected from a convenient sample of 185 nongovernmental organisation employees using a standard questionnaire. Structural models, with bootstrapping, were used to evaluate the hypothesised moderating and mediating effects. Main findings: Nonwork resources were positively associated with work engagement. External support moderated the negative relationship between nonwork demands and work engagement. Work engagement mediated the effects of nonwork resources and nonwork demands on employee productivity. Practical/managerial implications: Organizational leaders should appreciate the ecological conditions within which work and nonwork resources are generated and expended. This has implications on desirable, value creating workplace behaviours and related outcomes. Contribution/value-add: The study further exposed the interdependence of the work and non-work domains. Workplaces that enrich both domains will likely enjoy sustained value generation.
Published: 31 October 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1960

Abstract:
Orientation: Overreliance on goodness-of-fit (GoF) indices in confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) model fit evaluations appears to negatively influence the integrity and replicability of research findings in general, and on research to develop work-to-family enrichment (WFE) theory in particular. Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to test for the conceptual replicability of the essentially unidimensional CFA model of the MACE Work-to-Family Enrichment scale (MACE-W2FE) using Bayesian structural equation modelling. Motivation for the study: Multidimensional and second-order factor models are commonly reported for WFE instruments, but the more tenable essentially unidimensional model has remained largely untested, because of the limitations of GoF indices. Research approach/design and method: Two independent cross-sectional study samples of 627 and 346 employees from various industry sectors was used. Bayesian structural equation modelling (BSEM) was applied to assess whether model misspecifications at local indicator level were substantive in terms of classical test theory, and justified the rejection of an essentially unidimensional CFA model (the breadth factor) for different MACE-W2FE versions. Main findings: In this study it was found that the essentially unidimensional model of the MACE-W2FE conceptually replicated across different studies, samples, MACE-W2FE versions and statistical theorems. Practical/managerial implications: The MACE-W2FE can be univocally scored as a single breadth factor for use in future research. Contribution/value-add: This study demonstrated the value of local indicator misspecification analysis using BSEM in countering deficient model testing in WFE studies.
Published: 31 October 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.2008

Abstract:
Orientation: Leaders must understand how to manage digital nomads in their companies. Research purpose: This study aimed to explore how digital nomads’ experiences shape their understanding of their work and life during the transitional career process. Motivation for the study: Little research explores why individuals become digital nomads and what they find important in their life and work. Research approach/design and method: This study employed the concept of working identity and used the open-ended approach of grounded theory. The snowball sampling method was used to recruit the participants, and data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 28 digital nomads. Main findings: The authors identified five stages related to how digital nomads’ experiences shape their views on what matters most to them in work and life: (1) rebelling against established work norms, (2) experimenting with ways of working and living, (3) crystallising personal work and life values, (4) living new work and life scripts and (5) rebelling against a nomadic lifestyle. Practical/managerial implications: This study provides useful findings for managers who are working in business strategy and policy settings and are seeking to recruit digital nomads. Career counsellors could also use this study’s findings to help individuals develop realistic expectations about the lifestyle and careers of digital nomads. Contribution/value-add: This study builds an understanding of nomadic experiences from a career exploration perspective and offers recommendations for future research on the role of luck in digital career paths and career decisions.
Precious Ngobeni,
Published: 28 October 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1971

Abstract:
Orientation: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted all job sectors. Arguably, the hardest hit were healthcare institutions. Nurses are at the front line, and it is known that the pandemic added pressure to the way nurses performed their duties. Their working schedules became more complex, including longer hours, as nurses dealt with high rates of COVID-19 cases while still dealing with other healthcare issues. Research purpose: The study aimed to establish the relationship between idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) and work engagement of nurses. The study focused on these three types of i-deals - task, flexibility and career. It investigated which i-deals best predict work engagement among nurses. Motivation for the study: There is a need to understand the work arrangements of nurses during the pandemic through i-deals. Although research on idiosyncratic deals has become popular in international research, there is scant research within the South African context. Research approach/design and method: The sample consisted of 220 nurses working in three private hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa. Inferential statistics and regression analysis were used to achieve the research objectives. Main findings: The study’s findings revealed a correlation between the three types of i-deals and work engagement. However, only task and flexibility i-deals predicted work engagement. The COVID-19 pandemic added pressure to the healthcare industry and to nurses’ challenges. The pandemic highlighted the importance of having an engaged nursing workforce. Thus, recommendations and suggestions for nurses, nursing managers and human resource managers are provided. Practical/managerial implications: The concept of i-deals is a reasonably new phenomenon within HR practices, and there is no empirical research within the South African context. Contribution/value-add: The study adds value by providing insight into customised work arrangements, from an i-deal perspective, during a much appropriate time and urgently needed for nurses.
Tessa de Wet, Sebastiaan Rothmann
Published: 27 October 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.2003

Abstract:
Orientation: The capability for work framework led to a shift in thinking about occupational health psychology. The value of work can only be preserved if decision-makers recognise that employees value their work and the competencies needed to excel at work. Research purpose: This study aimed to develop a list of capabilities from 21st-century competencies found in literature and to quantitatively measure the resulting 21st-century competency (21CC) capabilities of secondary school teachers (SSTs) – valued knowledge and skill dimensions that are enabled and can be realised. Motivation for study: This framework is an appropriate outline for studying the functioning of employees but lacks specificity regarding the specific competencies (knowledge and skills) needed to function well. Research approach/design and method: A convenience sample of SSTs (N = 144) in the Gauteng province completed the 21st-century competencies as capabilities questionnaire. Main findings: The results indicated that the 21CC capabilities are most likely to form part of SSTs’ capability set (i.e. the competencies that they value, are enabled in and achieve) were collaboration, constructive relationships and educational literacy. The 21CC capabilities least likely to form part of the teachers’ capability set included cognitive and digital literacy, processing and personal and professional development. Practical/managerial implications: Managers and practitioners should consider the concept of capability (value, empowerment and achievement) in management interventions and conceptualise occupation-specific competencies for use and development of knowledge and skills capabilities. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to scientific knowledge regarding the integration of specific competencies using the capability approach.
Published: 27 October 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1912

Abstract:
Orientation: Employability development is needed to alleviate poverty in South Africa. This study sought to examine employability development, with specific reference to soft employability skills within a low-income community in Gauteng province of South Africa. Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the labour market intervention offered by a non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Gauteng added value to learners with specific reference to soft skills (behavioural and psychosocial) needed to become employable. Motivation for the study: Soft employability skills are essential because they are highly demanded by employers today. It is not clear whether the learners from an NGO have obtained soft employability skills (behavioural and psychosocial) during the skills training intervention. Research approach/design and method: A qualitative constructivist approach was utilised. Using purposive sampling, 33 learners from an NGO participated in email interviews. The email interviews were analysed by using four steps prescribed by grounded theory researchers. Main findings: The study results highlight two themes that represent soft employability skills, namely, soft employability behavioural skills and soft employability psychosocial skills. Practical/managerial implications: The study provides government and NGOs with an understanding of soft employability skills valued by unemployed low-income workers. Contribution/value-add: This research contributes to literature by expanding the knowledge of soft employability behavioural skills and soft employability psychosocial skills. Forgiveness seems to be a new soft employability psychosocial skill, as it was not found in the theories and frameworks used in this article.
Melinde Coetzee, Rudolf M. Oosthuizen, Annelize van Niekerk
Published: 19 October 2022
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology, Volume 48; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.2016

Abstract:
Orientation: Internships are a practical way for students to operationalise their professional purpose, acquire key occupation-related skills and practise their professional capability in real-world work settings. Research purpose: This study explored industrial and organisational psychology (IOP) interns’ views of their professional purpose and their perceptions of the applied skills they developed as a result of the internship programme, including their confidence about setting up an independent practice. Motivation for the study: There is currently a dearth of South African research on IOP interns’ views about the internship programme. Research approach/design and method: The study utilised a qualitative research approach. An open-ended question survey was conducted among 17 South Africa-based IOP interns. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the collected data. Main findings: Data analysis revealed the intrinsic motivational self-determination of the interns as an influencing force for their personal purpose and vision as practising industrial psychologists (IPs). Views about the skills developed were aligned with HPCSA minimum competency requirements as manifested within the digital-era work space. Interns felt more confident about practising within an organisational setting rather than a private practice. Practical/managerial implications: Understanding the psychological self-determination needs that motivate the IOP intern may help to improve coursework training and supervision support practices for the IOP intern. Contribution/value-add: The study extends the internship research literature and revealed the dire need for enhancing the confidence of the IOP intern about setting up and successfully managing an independent professional IP practice.
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