Journal of Sustainable Tourism

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 09669582 / 17477646
Published by: Informa UK Limited
Total articles ≅ 2,058

Latest articles in this journal

, Char-Lee McLennan, Brent Moyle,
Published: 24 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-21; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2149760

Abstract:
Recommendations are a high form of community consultation, but rarely solicited in surveys of resident attitudes despite their potential to better inform planning and foster stronger event loyalty in an era of mega-event crisis. This paper innovates by identifying and structuring open-ended recommendations for the 2032 Brisbane Olympic Games from host region residents 10 years prior to that mega-event. From an online survey of 897 respondents, 946 discrete recommendations for event “success” were organised through thematic analysis into high level “event,” “community” and “organiser” themes. In the emergent community vision for the Games derived from these themes, host city residents aspire for efficient, affordable, and authentic Games that benefit and involve the host community and learn from the past. The vision’s focus on resident self-interest is unsurprising but challenges event organisers to accommodate the interests of multiple stakeholders. The aspiration for a sustainable community, nevertheless, is conducive to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and complements recent IOC reforms and the official 2032 Games Vision which call for greater responsiveness to host community interests. Under a framework of soft transformative governance, facilitating micro-transformations should ensure that marginalised groups are heard and their aspirations integrated into early mega-event planning.
, , Tsu-Hong Yen
Published: 24 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2150861

Abstract:
This study explores Gen Z diners’ perceptions of restaurant food waste generation and prevention, as well as their related moral decision-making. Drawing on the norm activation model and moral disengagement theory, a dual-route process model was developed to depict Gen Zers’ the moral judgement for wasting food or not at restaurants. Six online focus groups with Gen Z diners in the United States were conducted and thematic analysis was applied. The findings of this study identified multiple underlying psychological mechanisms (e.g., moral obligation activation vs. moral disengagement) for explaining Gen Z diners’ food waste behaviors. Situational factors, cultural factors, and restaurant-related factors all play a key role in the moral judgment process. The findings also revealed what Gen Z diners expect restaurants to do in order to address the food waste problem. This study provides valuable theoretical and managerial implications for tackling the food waste issue. The practical contribution of this study supports the restaurant industry to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goal 12 “Responsible Consumption and Production”.
, Tanja Mihalič, Richard R. Perdue
Published: 24 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-24; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2149759

Abstract:
This paper reviews resident tourism attitude research through the lens of the individual- and community-level perceived impacts of and responses to tourism. It explores how perceived impacts of tourism and responses to tourism development have been conceptualised and measured in the existing resident attitudes models published between 1990 and 2020. Three categories of variables were identified and used: antecedent variables, tourism impact variables, and dependent variables. The latter three categories are used to discuss the research topic from the lenses of improvements in measurement instruments. Finally, the paper suggests rethinking the overall conceptualisation of residents’ perceptions of and reactions to tourism – it proposes future research directions to distinguish between individual-level and community-level effects and reactions.
, Daniel Laven, Alon Gelbman
Published: 15 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2145291

Abstract:
In this study, we explore the role of women’s entrepreneurship in revitalizing the historic market district of Nazareth (Israel). This is a special context to examine the intersection of women’s entrepreneurship, tourism, and historic revitalization because of the complex geo-political, cross cultural, and community development setting. We examine the role of women through their practice of cultural tourism-oriented entrepreneurship and seek to understand factors motivating women to engage in such entrepreneurship, along with their unique contributions. We utilize a qualitative research approach and conducted semi-structured interviews, augmented by numerous site visits and participant observation. Findings reveal that respondents, along with their individual-level motivations, have a strong desire to act on behalf of all women as well as to contribute to the community at large. This study sheds light on the role that women play as bearers of specific craft traditions as well as their ability to provide a unique calming and stabilizing effect on the socio-economic environment through their venturing. Beyond Nazareth, this study offers insight into the relationship between tourism and the SDGs on gender equality (5), decent work and economic growth (8) and on building peace, justice and strong institutions (16).
Published: 14 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2144870

Abstract:
Existing research finds inconclusive evidence of tourism benefits of designating new National Parks (NP) and UNESCO World Heritage sites (WHS). This research advances this ongoing discussion by using a randomised experiment to test causal effects of these common protected area designations on future visit intention among domestic tourists in Australia. It also tests for moderating effects exerted by tourist beliefs and advertising strategy. The study finds that NP and WHS declarations significantly increase the likelihood of visitation, but the added value of declaring a WHS above NP is insignificant on a domestic tourism market. Tourists’ attitudes towards protected areas significantly moderate these effects, whereas effects related to advertising strategy are negligible. The paper makes significant contributions because it is the first in this area to: (a) use randomisation in the design to produce robust causal conclusions; (b) compare NP and WHS designations; and (c) scrutinise the role of advertising strategy.
, , Guiqing Li, Xiaodan Zou,
Published: 11 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2141249

Abstract:
This investigation focused on the antecedents and impacts on volunteer pro-environmental behavior, and explored the effects of meaningfulness through pride and environmental passion according to the cognitive appraisal theory of emotions. A mixed method research design was used, consisting of interviews, observations, and surveys with volunteers. The research was conducted at Danxia Mountain in Guangdong Province, China, a protected area, UNESCO World Heritage List site, and Geopark. Based on a survey of 302 volunteers, a sequential mediating model was tested through bootstrapping. It was found that perceived volunteering meaningfulness improved sustainable pro-environmental behavior, and pride and environmental passion played sequential mediating roles between meaningfulness and pro-environmental behavior. Compared with pride, environmental passion was the more significant and proximal antecedent of pro-environmental behavior. In addition, awe of the place strengthened the effects of pride and environmental passion on pro-environmental behavior. Theoretical and managerial implications for sustainable development practices in protected areas are outlined.
Published: 1 November 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-23; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2134399

Abstract:
The longstanding synergy between rural tourism and farming is under threat from agricultural intensification. Tourism interests in many parts of the world may find themselves facing the negative consequences of long-term shifts in farming practices, particularly the proliferation of intensive livestock operations or factory farms which accompanies the continuing rise in global meat consumption. This study from Herefordshire and Shropshire, in the UK, explores the complex relations surrounding the rapidly multiplying planning applications for intensive poultry units over the last ten years. Concerns that the poultry industry will harm local tourism trade are often raised, yet are denied by the farmer applicants and ignored by planning officers. There is little previous research about how tourists respond to intensive livestock operations and whether visitor economies could gradually experience harm from the cumulative environmental and other impacts. Drawing on survey, documentary, observational and interview data this research found increasing awareness among rural visitors and tourism businesses about negative experiential and economic impacts. Asymmetric power relations and dominant agricultural rationalities have held sway and suppressed tourism voices within a weak policy and planning context. The research recommends adjustments to planning processes to address the slow violence the development of industrial farming practices brings.
Published: 27 October 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-4; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2134402

Abstract:
In the introductory chapter to Tourism Geopolitics: Assemblages of Infrastructure, Affect, and Imagination, the authors refer to a headline from a travel news site that reads: “Tourism is now the g...
Published: 26 October 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2136189

Abstract:
Recent literature focuses on the inherent challenges of food delivery work. Less is known about how these injustices impact workers and their lives more broadly, or how workers navigate them. This empirical article is based on a 12-month ethnographic theory-relevant case study and includes an innovative shadowing method focused on migrant food delivery workers in Brisbane, Australia. We found that temporary migrant workers face intersectional injustices, exacerbated by the COVID-19 crisis, both within and beyond the platform economy. Nevertheless, the workers agentically enacted their own justices to navigate their precarity, in the absence of institutional supports. This study’s theoretical contribution is the development of a model explaining the agentic and structural underpinnings of the injustices that migrant platform workers experience. Moreover, our contribution reveals that the unique attributes that migrants bring to bear on their platform work provide them with the affordances to navigate the injustices they experience. In so doing they mitigate some of the negative impacts of platform work, and indeed derive benefits that non-migrant platform workers might not.
Published: 26 October 2022
Journal of Sustainable Tourism pp 1-22; https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2022.2137729

Abstract:
Snowmaking has been an integral part of the multi-billion-dollar ski industry in most regional markets for more than 20 years and is one of the most visible and widespread forms of climate adaptation in the tourism sector. Under accelerating climate change, snowmaking is projected to increase at most destinations - some substantially. Snowmaking has come under increasing criticism in recent years and branded by some scholars and ski industry observers as unsustainable and maladaptive as a climate change response. Using data on snowmaking from across the diverse US ski market, this study assesses snowmaking against multiple established criteria that define maladaptation. The analysis demonstrates that snowmaking is highly place-context specific, varying at the individual operator and regional market scales, and represents a continuum from successful (and sustainable) adaptation to maladaptation. Regions of the US where snowmaking is most likely to be maladaptive are identified (water insecure and carbon intense electricity grids). The framework highlights the importance of scale and a tourism system perspective when assessing (mal)adaptation and provides decision-makers with a tool to evaluate the compatibility of snowmaking with climate action plans at the destination and regional scale.
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