Literature and medicine

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 02789671 / 10806571
Published by: Project Muse
Total articles ≅ 1,060

Latest articles in this journal

Laureanne Willems
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 38-54; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0008

Abstract:
What are the formal potentialities of illness narratives across media and writerly modes? And how can a formalist reading within this genre contribute to an understanding of particularly stigmatized illnesses and conditions? This essay considers Julia Lederer's and Carolyn Lazard's semi-autobiographical works on anorexia nervosa and chronic illness, respectively, and approaches them through the lens of Caroline Levine's new formalist method, which fuses the literary (or artistic more broadly) with the social and political. It concludes that Lederer's and Lazard's imagination and creation of other, alternative worlds—worlds of illness and disability—provide critical insights into the meanings of illness, health, and well-being, and their political implications. In so doing, they also probe at and question the role of medicine in discursive constructions of illness and disability.
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 196-199; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0020

Cathy Choi
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 5-17; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0002

Maggie O'Leary
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 55-76; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0009

Abstract:
In this essay, I outline the colonial origins of the prevailing beliefs and attitudes towards fatness and current justifications for marginalizing fat bodies. I argue that, because the lineages of anti-fatness are beholden to the violence of colonialism and anti-Blackness, any theorization of fat that relies upon the pathological concept of "obesity" reinforces the imaginative purchase this history continues to exert within literary treatments of fat. As a remedy to this, I argue that Carmen Maria Machado's short story "Eight Bites" provides an alternate interpretive framework that invests in the capacity of a fat belly to nourish and even mother bodies as the organ that cares for those bodies the most. By framing weight-loss surgery as a loss to be mourned, Machado challenges the ongoing "duress" caused by anti-fatness and contends that fat can be generative and even reparative, rather than a perpetual signifier of illness and premature death.
Kim Adams
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 167-171; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0014

Michael Blackie
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0000

Kc Councilor
Published: 1 March 2022
Literature and medicine, Volume 40, pp 25-28; https://doi.org/10.1353/lm.2022.0005

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