Biochemical Society Transactions

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 03005127 / 14708752
Published by: Portland Press Ltd.
Total articles ≅ 30,424

Latest articles in this journal

Yingying Meng,
Published: 1 December 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20221015

Abstract:
We recently discovered a novel biological process, the scheduled remodeling of Z-DNA structures in the developing fetal mouse male germ cells [Nat. Cell Biol. 24, 1141–1153]. This process affects purine/pyrimidine dinucleotide repeat (PPR) rich sequences, which can form stable left-handed Z-DNA structures. The protein that carries out this function is identified as ZBTB43, member of a large family of ZBTB proteins. Z-DNA remodeling by ZBTB43 not only coincides with global remodeling of DNA methylation and chromatin events in the male germ line, but it also is a prerequisite for de novo DNA methylation. When ZBTB43 changes DNA structure from the left-handed zigzag shaped Z-DNA to the regular smooth right-handed B-DNA, it also generates a suitable substrate for the de novo DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3A. By instructing de novo DNA methylation at PPRs in prospermatogonia, ZBTB43 safeguards epigenomic integrity of the male gamete. PPRs are fragile sequences, sites of large deletions and rearrangements in mammalian cells, and this fragility is thought to be due to Z-DNA structure formation rather than the sequence itself. This idea is now supported by the in vivo finding that DNA double strand breaks accumulate in mutant prospermatogonia which lack ZBTB43-dependent Z-DNA remodeling. If unrepaired, double stranded DNA breaks can lead to germ line mutations. Therefore, by preventing such breaks ZBTB43 is critical for guarding genome stability between generations. Here, we discuss the significance and implications of these findings in more detail.
Alessandro Quaranta, Johanna Revol-Cavalier,
Published: 1 December 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20210644

Abstract:
Oxylipins are enzymatic and non-enzymatic metabolites of mono- or polyunsaturated fatty acids that encompass potent lipid mediators including the eicosanoids and docosanoids. Previously considered of low interest and often dismissed as ‘just fat', octadecanoid oxylipins have only recently begun to be recognized as lipid mediators in humans. In the last few years, these compounds have been found to be involved in the mediation of multiple biological processes related to nociception, tissue modulation, cell proliferation, metabolic regulation, inflammation, and immune regulation. At the same time, the study of octadecanoids is hampered by a lack of standardization in the field, a paucity of analytical standards, and a lack of domain expertise. These issues have collectively limited the investigation of the biosynthesis and bioactivity of octadecanoids. Here, we present an overview of the primary enzymatic pathways for the oxidative metabolism of 18-carbon fatty acids in humans and of the current knowledge of the major biological activity of the resulting octadecanoids. We also propose a systematic nomenclature system based upon that used for the eicosanoids in order to avoid ambiguities and resolve multiple designations for the same octadecanoid. The aim of this review is to provide an initial framework for the field and to assist in its standardization as well as to increase awareness of this class of compounds in order to stimulate research into this interesting group of lipid mediators.
Matthew A.H. Parson, Meredith L. Jenkins,
Published: 1 December 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20220206

Abstract:
A large amount of the human proteome is composed of highly dynamic regions that do not adopt a single static conformation. These regions are defined as intrinsically disordered, and they are found in a third of all eukaryotic proteins. They play instrumental roles in many aspects of protein signaling, but can be challenging to characterize by biophysical methods. Intriguingly, many of these regions can adopt stable secondary structure upon interaction with a variety of binding partners, including proteins, lipids, and ligands. This review will discuss the application of Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) as a powerful biophysical tool that is particularly well suited for structural and functional characterization of intrinsically disordered regions in proteins. A focus will be on the theory of hydrogen exchange, and its practical application to identify disordered regions, as well as characterize how they participate in protein–protein and protein–membrane interfaces. A particular emphasis will be on how HDX-MS data can be presented specifically tailored for analysis of intrinsically disordered regions, as well as the technical aspects that are critical to consider when designing HDX-MS experiments for proteins containing intrinsically disordered regions.
Grace Lee, Rebecca S. Kim, Sang Bum Lee, Sukyeong Lee,
Published: 1 December 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20220590

Abstract:
Hsp100 chaperones, also known as Clp proteins, constitute a family of ring-forming ATPases that differ in 3D structure and cellular function from other stress-inducible molecular chaperones. While the vast majority of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones promote the folding of either the nascent chain or a newly imported polypeptide to reach its native conformation, Hsp100 chaperones harness metabolic energy to perform the reverse and facilitate the unfolding of a misfolded polypeptide or protein aggregate. It is now known that inside cells and organelles, different Hsp100 members are involved in rescuing stress-damaged proteins from a previously aggregated state or in recycling polypeptides marked for degradation. Protein degradation is mediated by a barrel-shaped peptidase that physically associates with the Hsp100 hexamer to form a two-component system. Notable examples include the ClpA:ClpP (ClpAP) and ClpX:ClpP (ClpXP) proteases that resemble the ring-forming FtsH and Lon proteases, which unlike ClpAP and ClpXP, feature the ATP-binding and proteolytic domains in a single polypeptide chain. Recent advances in electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) together with single-molecule biophysical studies have now provided new mechanistic insight into the structure and function of this remarkable group of macromolecular machines.
Kyprianos Hadjidemetriou, Satinder Kaur, C. Keith Cassidy,
Published: 24 November 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20220191

Abstract:
Chemotaxis signaling pathways enable bacteria to sense and respond to their chemical environment and, in some species, are critical for lifestyle processes such as biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The signal transduction underlying chemotaxis behavior is mediated by large, highly ordered protein complexes known as chemosensory arrays. For nearly two decades, cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) has been used to image chemosensory arrays, providing an increasingly detailed understanding of their structure and function. In this mini-review, we provide an overview of the use of cryoET to study chemosensory arrays, including imaging strategies, key results, and outstanding questions. We further discuss the application of molecular modeling and simulation techniques to complement structure determination efforts and provide insight into signaling mechanisms. We close the review with a brief outlook, highlighting promising future directions for the field.
, Michael L. Skowyra,
Published: 24 November 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20221393

Abstract:
Peroxisomes are membrane-bounded organelles that exist in most eukaryotic cells and are involved in the oxidation of fatty acids and the destruction of reactive oxygen species. Depending on the organism, they house additional metabolic reactions that range from glycolysis in parasitic protozoa to the production of ether lipids in animals and antibiotics in fungi. The importance of peroxisomes for human health is revealed by various disorders — notably the Zellweger spectrum — that are caused by defects in peroxisome biogenesis and are often fatal. Most peroxisomal metabolic enzymes reside in the lumen, but are synthesized in the cytosol and imported into the organelle by mobile receptors. The receptors accompany cargo all the way into the lumen and must return to the cytosol to start a new import cycle. Recycling requires receptor monoubiquitination by a membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligase complex composed of three RING finger (RF) domain-containing proteins: PEX2, PEX10, and PEX12. A recent cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the complex reveals its function as a retro-translocation channel for peroxisomal import receptors. Each subunit of the complex contributes five transmembrane segments that assemble into an open channel. The N terminus of a receptor likely inserts into the pore from the lumenal side, and is then monoubiquitinated by one of the RFs to enable extraction into the cytosol. If recycling is compromised, receptors are polyubiquitinated by the concerted action of the other two RFs and ultimately degraded. The new data provide mechanistic insight into a crucial step of peroxisomal protein import.
Carlos Vela-Rodríguez,
Published: 24 November 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20220501

Abstract:
Ubiquitination is a protein post-translational modification that affects protein localisation, stability and interactions. E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate the final step of the ubiquitination reaction by recognising target proteins and mediating the ubiquitin transfer from an E2 enzyme. DTX3L is a multi-domain E3 ubiquitin ligase in which the N-terminus mediates protein oligomerisation, a middle D3 domain mediates the interaction with PARP9, a RING domain responsible for recognising E2 ∼ Ub and a DTC domain has the dual activity of ADP-ribosylating ubiquitin and mediating ubiquitination. The activity of DTX3L is known to be modulated by at least two different factors: the concentration of NAD+, which dictates if the enzyme acts as a ligase or as an ADP-ribosyltransferase, and its binding partners, which affect DTX3L activity through yet unknown mechanisms. In light of recent findings it is possible that DTX3L could ubiquitinate ADP-ribose attached to proteins. Different DTX3L–protein complexes have been found to be part of multiple signalling pathways through which they promote the adhesion, proliferation, migration and chemoresistance of e.g. lymphoma, glioma, melanoma, and prostate cancer. In this review, we have covered the literature available for the molecular functions of DTX3L especially in the context of cancer biology, different pathways it regulates and how these relate to its function as an oncoprotein.
Hui Wen Yeap,
Published: 24 November 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20211242

Abstract:
Upon sensing pathogenic bacterial infection, host cells activate a multitude of inflammatory and immunogenic responses to promote bacterial clearance and restore tissue homeostasis. RIPK1 and RIPK3 are two key players in antimicrobial defence, by either driving inflammatory signalling or inducing programmed cell death activation, ranging from apoptosis, pyroptosis to necroptosis. In this review, we first discuss the mechanisms by which RIPK1 and RIPK3 promote the assembly of death-inducing complexes and how these cell death pathways are activated as host responses to counteract pathogenic bacteria. We further outline the immunological importance of cell death in antibacterial defence and highlight outstanding questions in the field.
Holly A. Fryer, Gemma E. Hartley, Emily S.J. Edwards, Robyn E. O'Hehir,
Published: 24 November 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20220415

Abstract:
Natural infection with SARS-CoV-2 induces a robust circulating memory B cell (Bmem) population, which remains stable in number at least 8 months post-infection despite the contraction of antibody levels after 1 month. Multiple vaccines have been developed to combat the virus. These include two new formulations, mRNA and adenoviral vector vaccines, which have varying efficacy rates, potentially related to their distinct capacities to induce humoral immune responses. The mRNA vaccines BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) and mRNA-1273 (Moderna) elicit significantly higher serum IgG and neutralizing antibody levels than the adenoviral vector ChAdOx1 (AstraZeneca) and Ad26.COV2.S (Janssen) vaccines. However, all vaccines induce Spike- and RBD-specific Bmem, which are vital in providing long-lasting protection in the form of rapid recall responses to subsequent infections. Past and current SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VoC) have shown the capacity to escape antibody neutralization to varying degrees. A booster dose with an mRNA vaccine following primary vaccination restores antibody levels and improves the capacity of these antibodies and Bmem to bind viral variants, including the current VoC Omicron. Future experimental research will be essential to evaluate the durability of protection against VoC provided by each vaccine and to identify immune markers of protection to enable prognostication of people who are at risk of severe complications from COVID-19.
Emily N. Kennedy, Clay A. Foster, Sarah A. Barr,
Published: 23 November 2022
Biochemical Society Transactions; https://doi.org/10.1042/bst20220849

Abstract:
The rapid increase of ‘-omics' data warrants the reconsideration of experimental strategies to investigate general protein function. Studying individual members of a protein family is likely insufficient to provide a complete mechanistic understanding of family functions, especially for diverse families with thousands of known members. Strategies that exploit large amounts of available amino acid sequence data can inspire and guide biochemical experiments, generating broadly applicable insights into a given family. Here we review several methods that utilize abundant sequence data to focus experimental efforts and identify features truly representative of a protein family or domain. First, coevolutionary relationships between residues within primary sequences can be successfully exploited to identify structurally and/or functionally important positions for experimental investigation. Second, functionally important variable residue positions typically occupy a limited sequence space, a property useful for guiding biochemical characterization of the effects of the most physiologically and evolutionarily relevant amino acids. Third, amino acid sequence variation within domains shared between different protein families can be used to sort a particular domain into multiple subtypes, inspiring further experimental designs. Although generally applicable to any kind of protein domain because they depend solely on amino acid sequences, the second and third approaches are reviewed in detail because they appear to have been used infrequently and offer immediate opportunities for new advances. Finally, we speculate that future technologies capable of analyzing and manipulating conserved and variable aspects of the three-dimensional structures of a protein family could lead to broad insights not attainable by current methods.
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