Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 08997640 / 15527395
Published by: SAGE Publications
Total articles ≅ 2,119

Latest articles in this journal

Liora Arnon, Michal Almog-Bar,
Published: 28 November 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221132499

Abstract:
In this article, we introduce the concept of “engageability,” which refers to the ability of volunteer-employing nonprofit organizations to engage, motivate, and manage volunteers to maximize their potential and sustain the volunteering human resource. Engageability conceptually complements the two well-established concepts of volunteerability and recruitability. By offering this conceptual framework, we enable volunteer-employing organizations to assess the degree to which they are engaging volunteers and to make improvements in this regard. Engageability questions how organizations that have already recruited volunteers make themselves volunteer-friendly and engage volunteers effectively. Based on the literature, we offer a comprehensive framework that considers a large set of organizational practices from germane to engageability, framing them into four fundamental clusters: (a) value-based (ideological), (b) managerial, (c) physical, and (d) supportive connections. We introduce the conceptual model and provide explanation for each cluster and each with-cluster organizational practices and discuss the potential contribution of this conceptual model.
Jiansheng Tang, Heming Gong, Xuemei Bian, , Xiaoxuan Yang
Published: 23 November 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221138263

Abstract:
Donors often experience donation regret caused by charity wrongdoings and mismanagement, which will reduce future donation willingness. The literature has not fully delineated the underlying mechanism of donors’ response to experienced regret. The effective advertising appeal and message framing which could be used to mitigate the detrimental impact of experienced donation regret also remain unknown. This research dissects the impact of experienced regret on donation willingness by revealing the mediational effect of anticipated regret and the moderating role of advertising appeal (altruistic vs. egoistic) and message framing (gain- vs. loss-framed). The findings of two studies demonstrate that experienced regret negatively influences donation willingness through anticipated regret. Compared with egoistic appeals, altruistic appeals are more effective in extenuating the impacts of experienced regret. Gain-framed (compared with loss-framed) messages better mitigate anticipated regret and result in a higher level of willingness to donate. In addition to theoretical contributions, actionable practical implications are discussed.
Eleanor Brown, Claire Qing Fan
Published: 14 November 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221131050

Abstract:
In recent years, the emergence of new legal forms allowing for-profit firms to incorporate with a formal commitment to both profit and social purpose has disrupted the traditional American business-charity dichotomy. The arrival of these hybrid firms can be expected to affect the functioning of markets and poses a potential challenge to the role played by large nonprofits that provide quasi-public services such as education and health care. We construct duopoly models of competition between a nonprofit firm and either a traditional for-profit firm or a hybrid firm, simultaneously choosing output levels of a homogeneous good. We show that when the nonprofit competes with a hybrid firm it becomes less competitive in the sense that its output level contracts, it raises less net revenue with which to fund charity care, and it is more easily driven out of the market.
Published: 1 November 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221130691

Abstract:
The contested concept of social entrepreneurship has gained particular prominence in academic literature over the last few decades. To explore how patterns of understandings relating to social entrepreneurship have emerged and shifted over time, we undertook a critical historical review focusing on the most highly cited social entrepreneurship articles in each of five time periods over the last 30 years. We identify four thematic areas—conceptualization, theoretical approaches, the search for data, and social change outcomes—characteristic of each period, allowing us to plot the terrain of social entrepreneurship scholarship over time. We show how patterns emerge across these themes over time and relate our analysis to wider developments in the field. In concluding, we discuss how the concept has been theoretically and conceptually enriched by an ability to accommodate critique.
, Alnoor Ebrahim, Mary Kay Gugerty
Published: 27 October 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221123590

Abstract:
This article proposes a research program with two goals: (a) to support nonprofit leaders to productively engage evaluation and (b) to advance a meso-level theory of nonprofit evaluation that recognizes the diverse ways nonprofits contribute to social change. Such a research program is timely, as evaluation becomes increasingly institutionalized in the sector in ways that constrain nonprofit leaders from engaging productively with evaluation to advance their social impact. This research program brings existing nonprofit scholarship into conversation with evaluation scholarship and puts forward a research agenda organized around the practical dilemmas facing nonprofit leaders as they answer four key evaluation questions: what to evaluate, for what purpose, using which criteria, and with what evidence and methods. By anchoring a research program around these four questions, we seek to reopen the possibilities for how scholars can support nonprofit leaders in engaging evaluation to enhance their social impact.
Kevin D. Ward, , Gowun Park, Rachel Fyall
Published: 25 October 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221131747

Abstract:
The study of nonprofit advocacy has evolved significantly over the past two decades, yet gaps still remain in our understanding of the processes and roles of nonprofit organizations in policymaking and policy change. In part, these gaps may be exacerbated by limitations in the methodologies and research designs used to examine advocacy, despite the growing scholarship base. To investigate this possibility, this article reports the findings of a systematic literature review of 264 scholarly articles that examine the antecedents, processes, and/or outcomes of nonprofit advocacy. The sampling method relies heavily on scholarship published in six leading nonprofit and public administration journals. Although theory suggests that nonprofit organizations have a vital role in facilitating policy processes, much of the advocacy research relies upon a limited form of research questions and methods. Findings also reveal a need for greater precision in describing data, design, and methods, and suggest a need for clearer, validated measures of both nonprofit advocacy efforts and the resulting outcomes. Finally, we suggest new areas for nonprofit advocacy research, including investigating new venues, different levels of analysis, employing emerging research methods, and examining advocacy over time.
William Prince,
Published: 12 October 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221127974

Abstract:
Volunteers play a critical role in government and nonprofit organizations. Yet, volunteer management research has focused on universal prescriptions or a contingency perspective based on the needs of the organization rather than the volunteer. As volunteers are a finite resource, how can nonprofits retain their volunteers? We conduct a qualitative analysis of open-ended responses to explore how assessments of volunteer management vary across satisfaction levels as delineated by the Net Promoter Score (NPS) scale. We find evidence that the most satisfied volunteers may be important resources to volunteer programs for the insight and advice they offer as champions of the collective. We also observe patterns across satisfaction levels suggesting that volunteer satisfaction is linked to volunteer development. Our research offers the NPS, a commonly used feedback measure, as a valuable tool for volunteer management to measure volunteer satisfaction, to identify enthusiastic promoters, and to examine volunteer development.
, Lutz Thieme
Published: 12 October 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221129579

Abstract:
This study analyzes the effect of opportunity costs on the decision to volunteer, the extent of volunteering, and how opportunity costs are related to competing volunteering activities. Our results reveal that opportunity costs operationalized as net wage per hour had the predicted negative effect on the extent of volunteering but a positive effect on the decision to volunteer. When the individual hourly net wage of the surveyed volunteers is applied, volunteering has average opportunity costs of about 14€/h. As volunteering competes with other activities, we assigned opportunity costs to different activities such as family, hobbies, paid work, or spending time with friends. Results show that, overall, opportunity costs of volunteering are especially related to family activities and less so to paid work. This implies that volunteering activities, in general, compete with family activities rather than with paid work or other activities.
Allison R. Russell, Courtney E. Boen,
Published: 12 October 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640221125805

Abstract:
The extant literature on volunteering has focused primarily on the many benefits of volunteering for older adults. However, the question rarely investigated is whether these benefits dissipate when older adults retire from their volunteering. Given the U.S. policy context wherein volunteering is promoted as a solution to the problems of aging, this research investigates the association between the loss of one’s volunteering role through retirement and well-being. Utilizing three waves of the U.S.-based National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) (2005–2016) and a fixed-effects modeling approach, we find that the well-being of older adults, measured as self-reported health, happiness, and depressive risk, is negatively associated with volunteer retirement. Our study contributes to the literature on well-being and volunteering for older adults and is the first study focusing on this critical transition point in the life of older volunteers. In addition, policymakers and organizations must broaden their focus to include not only the recruitment and retention of older adult volunteers but also the transition out of volunteering that many of them will eventually face.
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