Alternative and Complementary Therapies

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 10762809 / 15579085
Total articles ≅ 1,718

Latest articles in this journal

Khara Lucius
Published: 1 December 2021
Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Volume 27, pp 289-297; https://doi.org/10.1089/act.2021.29356.klu

Abstract:
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a highly prevalent condition, with estimated incidence ranging from 6% to 20% of women worldwide. PCOS causes significant impact to quality of life in affected women. PCOS is driven by both insulin resistance (IR) and hyperandrogenemia. Because weight loss is a primary consideration in people with PCOS, nutrition and lifestyle change have especially important roles to play. Women with PCOS may derive many benefits from a low-carbohydrate diet approach, which may address the IR seen in this condition. This article reviews data related not only to nutritional approaches to PCOS, but also for nutritional supplements or botanical medicines that may be considered. These include N-acetylcysteine, chromium, melatonin, inositol, vitamin D, fenugreek seed extract, and curcumin.
Published: 1 December 2021
Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Volume 27, pp 253-253; https://doi.org/10.1089/act.2021.29357.rro

Arash Asher, Sungjin Kim, Márcio Augusto Diniz, Alexandra Mack, Celina H. Shirazipour
Published: 1 December 2021
Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Volume 27, pp 276-284; https://doi.org/10.1089/act.2021.29360.aas

Abstract:
Background: There is a need for low-risk nonpharmaceutical methods to support psychosocial distress associated with breast cancer (BC). This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and impact of an improvisational theater (improv) program for BC survivors. Methods: Female BC survivors (n = 17) participated in a six-week improv program. Feasibility was assessed through attendance frequency and percentage attrition. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, Version 29 (PROMIS-29), and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale were used to measure well-being and quality of life at three time points: baseline, end of program, and one-month follow-up. Changes in these measures were assessed using a linear mixed-effects model. Results: The program had low attrition (5.88%) and high attendance (94%). FACT-G and loneliness scores improved significantly between baseline and end of program (p's < 0.05). Changes in FACT-G remained significant at follow-up (P = 0.009). Significant improvements between baseline and the end of the program were also present for anxiety, depression, fatigue, and ability to participate in social roles/activities as measured by the PROMIS-29 (p's < 0.05). Changes in anxiety and depression remained significant at follow-up (p's < 0.05). Conclusion: Improv represents a novel method for supporting the quality of life and well-being of BC survivors. This is the first study to examine improv among BC survivors. Findings demonstrate that an improv intervention is feasible in this population. A larger randomized controlled trial is warranted to more fully examine the impact of this novel intervention.
A Clinical Conversation With Melinda R. Ring, Robert Rountree
Published: 1 December 2021
Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Volume 27, pp 254-261; https://doi.org/10.1089/act.2021.29354.mri

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