Journalism Practice

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 17512786 / 17512794
Published by: Informa UK Limited
Total articles ≅ 1,303

Latest articles in this journal

, Carolyn Nielsen, Jeff Shaw
Published: 23 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2139743

Abstract:
For decades, news narratives centered the voices of elites over sources with lived experience, even when journalists said they did not intend to favor elites. A new technology platform, Hearken, invites audiences to influence reporting by building “gates” that allow people to move between the roles of news creator and news consumer. This affords an opportunity to assess whether audience participation influences journalists to include more diverse perspectives in reporting. In stories produced by public radio stations using the Hearken platform, sources with lived experience exceeded recent patterns of elite vs. non-elite sourcing in commercial and public media in the U.S.
, Shengnan Pang,
Published: 21 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2142838

Abstract:
Through a survey of Chinese journalists, this study tests a moderated mediation model of journalists’ organizational commitment ensuing journalism industry recession. Sustained by social exchange theory and expectancy theory, this study found that perceived social impact is positively related to perceived task significance, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. The positive relationship between perceived social impact and organizational commitment is mediated by perceived task significance and job satisfaction. More importantly, taking journalism as a social-value-loaded profession, the study reveals that altruism negatively moderated the relationship between perceived social impact and organizational commitment, whereas positively moderated the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment.
Published: 17 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2147096

Abstract:
Modern journalism practices rely heavily on the use of sources. Traditionally, white, male officials are journalists’ primary sources. This silences underrepresented voices, leading to symbolic annihilation of minority communities in media coverage. Journalists often cite their inability to reach communities outside of their own perspective as a primary reason for this symbolic annihilation, but what happens when reporters’ networks of power are widened through digital connections? Previous research has explored the role of social media as a tool for newsgathering, and some studies suggest social media can provide the opportunity for journalists to reach previously inaccessible communities. Yet, the network theory of power suggests some nodes of these digital networks can create elite sources like officials or influencers that may uphold traditional sourcing practices and hegemonic power structures. Utilizing qualitative interviews with professional journalists, this study seeks to understand whether tapping into broader networks of power through social media helps journalists combat symbolic annihilation of sources or whether hegemonic structures continue. It also offers insight into influences on journalists’ use of social media for multiperspectival sourcing and suggestions for reliance on certain networks for diversification of sources.
Chang Zhang, , Philippe Blanchard
Published: 17 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-28; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2140445

Abstract:
The vital role of international broadcasting during times of international conflict has gained increasing attention; however, national variations in terms of communication strategies have rarely been explored in depth. This study fills this research gap by providing a comparative analysis of the communication strategies of Chinese and Russian state-sponsored international broadcasters. By examining CGTN’s coverage of the South China Sea arbitration and RT’s coverage of the Ukraine crisis in 2014, we find that the Chinese international broadcaster preferred official Chinese sources and a peace frame during a time of conflict, whereas its Russian counterpart tended to engage with Western countercultural speakers and present conflict frames. We further interpret the two media’s different usage of sources and frames in the light of the media’s organizational culture and the sponsoring states’ national identities. The research advances the scholarship on the increasingly intensive information war between the East and the West through the way international broadcasters cover international conflicts. It enriches our understanding of the cultural and national dynamics underpinning the non-Western emerging countries’ approaches of international communication.
, Roberto Spiezio
Published: 15 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2145339

Abstract:
News values is a research topic that has received extensive attention in the scholarship. However, previous studies have not widely examined news values in the context of Citizen Journalism. Drawing on Harcup and O’Neill’s (2017. “What is News?: News Values Revisited (Again).” Journalism Studies 18 (12): 1470–1488) contemporary news values model, this study employs a content analysis of 420 Citizen Journalism and mainstream news lead articles in Hong Kong media, collected respectively from the local outlets StandNews and MingPao. The results show that Citizen Journalism publication StandNews tends to adopt and make similar use of news values to the mainstream MingPao in publishing its articles, which suggests that in Hong Kong, Citizen Journalism is increasingly closing the gap with mainstream media in terms of the editorial decisions that lead to the publication of news stories and, more in general, in terms of newsworthiness. This study intends to contribute to the comprehension of how news values compare between Citizen Journalism and mainstream news outlets, and therefore whether Citizen Journalism presents traits of newsworthiness.
, Jessica Retis
Published: 14 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-4; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2142839

Abstract:
Albeit an increase in awareness of minority problems, people from immigrant, ethno-cultural, and diverse racial groups or who are lesbian, bisexual, gay, or transgender or who are from low-income g...
Published: 14 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2142836

Abstract:
Local news organizations are currently redefining how they tell stories, and one tool they are utilizing to reconnect with members of their communities is solutions journalism. This solutions-oriented approach to storytelling includes voices who have the tools to combat local, national, and international problems as well as those who have been directly impacted by issues. This back-and-forth narrative gives deeper insight into issues pervading society (and what can be done about them) than a traditional news story might. However, much is still unknown about how journalists and their media organizations are defining and practicing solutions journalism, especially from the context of local media. This study sought to give foundational understanding to how media practitioners in the southeastern United States who recognize and utilize solutions journalism are pioneering this subsection of the journalism landscape. Insights mined from semi-structured interviews indicate that the definition and practice of solutions journalism is evolving, and that symbiotic relationships formed through the practice of solutions journalism can aid in building credibility, creating stronger bonds within communities, and positively impacting underrepresented communities through tangible change.
, Juana Dolores Santana-Hernández
Published: 14 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-22; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2137684

Abstract:
The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus pandemic has affected fundamental aspects with ramifications on our coexistence, including the manner in which older people are perceived and how we interact with them. In this work, the researchers study how older people were represented by the media in the first year of the pandemic by analysing six of Spain's most widely read digital newspapers. To this end, the authors have studied whether journalists gave older people the means through which they, or their representative organizations, families, or healthcare workers could express themselves. Furthermore, the authors have also studied the imagery that readers have created of older people by analysing the readers comments section of news reports. A total of 1,278 textual units were obtained that include both journalistic pieces and readers comments. These units were processed qualitatively and quantitatively using categories of analysis pertaining to the imagery of older people, care homes, their health and quality of life, and critiques of actions taken by politicians. The conclusion drawn is that these newspapers did not adopt frames that adequately represent older people as individuals who are active and useful members of society, nor as a dynamic consumer group that activates the market and stimulates the economy.
Published: 8 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2136104

Abstract:
The public persona of the 8th PM of Malaysia, Muhyiddin Yassin, was derived from the metaphorical framing of the Good Father archetype. Archetypes do not always lead to logical conclusions because issues are framed by focusing on specific aspects while avoiding those that are inconsistent with the metaphor. Metaphorical structures influence the way we perceive, think or act. Muhyiddin’s abah persona can be described as monolithic. It normalizes the conservative Malay value that upholds the patriarchal role while marginalizing other ethnic or religious representations and their cultural and parenting practices. Muhyiddin had exploited this privileged position so as to further the asymmetrical power relation. The Malaysian collective fantasy of a Good Father is not uniform and Muhyiddin’s abah was challenged by a Shadow Father counternarrative. This exploratory study is limited in achieving depth of understanding of gender roles representation but explores instead the strategic actors, namely Muhyiddin and his supporters, how they tried to build the image of a Good Abah, and how the narrative was negotiated and contested, as well as the ideologies that were promoted or reinforced by the father archetype. Findings include readers’ polarized views of good father, low-key misogyny, the traditional and stereotyped expectation of men.
Published: 7 November 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2142837

Abstract:
This study applies a typology of public data transparency infrastructure and the contextualism framework for analysing journalism practice to examine patterns in data journalism production. The goal was to identify differences in approaches to acquiring and reporting on data around the world based on comparisons of public data transparency infrastructure. Data journalists from 34 countries were interviewed to understand challenges in data access, strategies used to overcome obstacles, innovation in collaboration, and attitudes about open-data advocacy. Analysis reveals themes of different approaches to journalistic interventionism by overcoming structural obstacles and inventive techniques journalists use to acquire and build their own data sets even in the most restrictive government contexts. Data journalists are increasingly connected with colleagues, third parties, and the public in using data, eschewing notions of competition for collaboration, and using crowdsourcing to address gaps in data. Patterns of direct and indirect activism are highlighted. Results contribute to a better understanding of global data journalism practice by revealing the influence of public data transparency infrastructure as a major factor that constrains or creates opportunities for data journalism practice as a subfield. Findings also broaden the cross-national base of empirical evidence on the developing practices and attitudes of data journalists.
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