BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

Journal Information
ISSN: 09598138
Published by: BMJ
Total articles ≅ 393,326

Latest articles in this journal

Tony Delamothe
Published: 29 March 2012
by BMJ
BMJ (Clinical research ed.), Volume 344; https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e2363

Harish Nair, Alison Holmes, Igor Rudan,
Published: 28 March 2012
by BMJ
BMJ (Clinical research ed.), Volume 344; https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e2217

Abstract:
Should be mandatory There is clear evidence that healthcare workers play an important role in transmitting infections to their patients.1 The World Health Organization and national immunisation guidelines in 60% of developed and emerging economies strongly recommend annual vaccination against seasonal influenza for all healthcare workers in acute and long term care facilities.2 However, unlike other prophylactic measures targeted at healthcare workers, such as hepatitis B vaccination, the uptake of flu vaccine has been generally poor. In the United States, two decades of consistent advocacy by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention achieved a self reported vaccine coverage of only 64% among healthcare workers by 2010-1.3 In the United Kingdom, despite recommendations by the Department of Health, uptake of seasonal flu vaccine was a dismal 35% among frontline healthcare workers in the same year.4 Flu contributes greatly to global mortality and morbidity and has important economic consequences. Each year, seasonal flu affects 5-10% of the world’s population, causing 3-5 million severe infections and resulting in 250 000-500 000 deaths. Young children (especially those under 1 year); pregnant …
Ravi Narayan, Thelma Narayan
Published: 28 March 2012
by BMJ
BMJ (Clinical research ed.), Volume 344; https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e2247

Abstract:
Now is the time to move beyond rhetoric and get the action right In 1946 the Health Survey and Development Committee for India recommended a health service that was “as close to the people as possible . . . with no individual failing to secure adequate care because of inability to pay.”1 Commitments were made to achieve this vision in 25 years, by 1971, but these are yet to be realised. A high level expert group on universal health coverage was instituted by the Indian Planning Commission in 2010 to revisit this ethical imperative. Its mandate was to create: a blueprint for human resources in health; physical and financial norms to ensure quality, universal reach, and access; crucial management reforms; pathways for constructive participation of communities and the private sector; systems to access essential drugs, vaccines, and medical technology; and a framework for health financing and financial protection. The committee also decided to examine the social determinants of health.2 Recently, after a year of gathering evidence and consultation that reviewed policy, process, and the complex nature of the Health for All challenge, the group has presented its findings and recommendations, all of which are highly commendable.2 The four elements that the expert group recommended should underpin the core principles of an Indian healthcare …
Published: 28 March 2012
by BMJ
BMJ (Clinical research ed.), Volume 344; https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.e2346

Abstract:
More medicine should never be conflated with better medicine, because today developed countries are suffering a contagion of iatrogenic harm. Why has this happened? Profit is the poison at the heart of the problem, spawning health anxiety and unnecessary intervention. This phenomenon is taking grip in emerging economies, like those of China and India, with the new middle classes subjected to unnecessary medical interventions. Screening is presented as best practice. But regular general health screening “check ups” have no scientific basis, serving only to highlight unimportant minor abnormalities, …
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