Journal Journal of Cancer Education

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1,438 articles
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Marianne Brouwers, Chris Van Weel, Roland Laan, Evelyn Van Weel-Baumgarten
Published: 21 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-4; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1415-8

Abstract:Feedback is a key factor in acquiring breaking bad news (BBN) communication skills and its’ acceptance depends on the perceived credibility of the provider. Our aim was to investigate students’ opinions on the provided feedback by different educators (surgeons, psychologists, and simulated patient (SP)) during BBN skills training. We developed a questionnaire investigating provided feedback by the surgeon, psychologist, and SP (yes or no statements), regarding (1) perceived safety of the atmosphere, (2) perceived positive feedback, (3) perceived specific feedback, and (4) perceived usefulness for improvement during BBN skills training. Five hundred twenty students returned the questionnaire after BBN skills training. Most students rated the feedback as positive, specific, and useful. Also, the atmosphere was considered safe. Feedback ratings of the SP were the same as for the surgeon and valued higher than for the psychologist. An unsafe atmosphere, or not receiving positive, specific, or useful feedback was mostly related to the psychologist’s feedback. Feedback on BBN skills training by surgeons and SPs is rated equally helpful by students and is regarded specific, useful, and positive. When designing a BBN training, it is worth to consider involving SP’s as well as clinicians.
Aslı Akdeniz Kudubes, Murat Bektas, Kamer Mutafoğlu
Published: 21 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-12; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1419-4

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Paraskevi A. Farazi, Mohammad Siahpush, Shannon Maloney, Danae Dinkel, Arthur Michalek, Rahama John, Olabode Oluwole
Published: 16 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-5; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1416-7

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Bahar Kefeli Çol, Dilek Kılıç
Published: 16 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-9; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1410-0

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M. Lizette Rangel, Natalia I. Heredia, Belinda Reininger, Lorna McNeill, Maria E. Fernandez
Published: 15 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-8; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1417-6

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Remila Rezhake, Xiao-Qian Xu, Sandrine Montigny, Anouk Berger, Shang-Ying Hu, Zhi-Hua Liu, Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan, You-Lin Qiao, Partha Basu, Fang-Hui Zhao
Published: 11 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-7; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1409-6

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Sailaja Kamaraju, Jessica Olson, Melissa DeNomie, Alexis Visotcky, Anjishnu Banerjee, Onur Asan, Emmanuel Tavares, Amrita Rao, Megan LaCroix, Kate Krause, et al.
Published: 9 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-5; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1412-y

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Lensa Idossa, Lih-Wen Mau, Stacy Stickney Ferguson, Ellen Denzen, Elizabeth Murphy, Heather Moore
Published: 9 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-7; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1407-8

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Hwa Yeon Park, Mi Jin Kim, Ju Young Kim, Sarah Kim, Ji Young Choi, Jeong Hyun Kim, Hee Yeong Jeong
Published: 8 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-8; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1399-4

Abstract:The number of cancer patients has been rapidly increasing, and while there have been wide variations, cancer survival rates also improved globally. Despite the improved survival rates, supportive care needs of cancer patients have been unmet in various domains. The current study aimed to investigate unmet needs that had potential to be managed by peer supports according to cancer trajectories. We used the comprehensive needs assessment tool in cancer (CNAT) and a modified CNAT to evaluate the unmet needs and peer support needs of cancer patients at the tertiary hospital of South Korea. Of the 402 participants, 335 (83.3%) needed peer support. For patients who had been diagnosed with cancer for more than 5 years, the highest proportion of peer support needs to unmet supportive care was reported in information domain (92.9%). Patients with advanced cancer reported peer support needs in the social/religious/spiritual (84.4%) and practical domains (81.1%). Most of stomach cancer patients needed peer supports to receive information (96.6%). The need for peer supports in the information domain was reported highest according to longer survival period and also according to advanced cancer stages. The proportion of peer support needs in unmet supportive care varied by cancer type. Further interventional studies are needed to investigate satisfaction with peer support in specific domains.
Parvin Alizadeh Sabeg, Esmat Mehrabi, Roghaiyeh Nourizadeh, Hamid Poursharifi, Saeed Mousavi
Published: 7 August 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-9; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1411-z

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