Journal Journal of Cancer Education

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1,417 articles
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Amelie G. Ramirez, Kipling J. Gallion, Arely Perez, Rebecca T. Adeigbe, Edgar Munoz, Rena J. Pasick
Published: 16 July 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-10; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1397-6

Abstract:Latinos lag behind other racial/ethnic groups in pursuit of master’s and doctoral degrees in public health and the health sciences. Éxito! is modeled after the Minority Training Program in Cancer Control Research (MTPCCR), which found that Latino participants went on to doctoral programs at a lower rate (12%) than African American (36%) and Asian participants (33%). Éxito! Latino Cancer Research Leadership Training is designed to increase the number of Latinos who pursue doctoral degrees and careers in cancer health disparity (CHD) research. The program has three components: recruitment with partnering universities and associations, an ethnically tailored intensive 5-day summer institute (SI), and 6-month paid internships offered on a competitive basis. Up to 20 master’s level students/master’s level health professionals are selected annually to participate in the SI; faculty are leaders in Latino CHD research. Funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from 2011 to 2015, Éxito! recruited 101 summer institute participants and awarded 21 internships. Analyses of pre- and post-institute surveys showed significant increases in confidence to apply to a doctoral program and academic self-efficacy among summer institute participants, and significantly increased research skills among interns. Forty-three percent of Éxito! program alumni applied to a doctoral program (our main outcome) and 29.7% were currently enrolled. This is nearly double the rate for MTPCCR Latino participants (17%) for the corresponding time period. Éxito! is a model pipeline program for encouragement of Latinos on to doctoral programs (e.g., PhD and DrPH) with the potential to increase the pool of cancer health disparity researchers.
Süleyman Yıldırım, Seher Nazlı Kazaz, Hüseyin Salih Semiz, Tuğba Yavuzşen, Işıl Somalı, Hülya Ellidokuz, Ilhan Öztop
Published: 13 July 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-7; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1395-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Anubhuti Shukla, Joshua Nyambose, Rebecca Vanucci, Lisa Bennett Johnson, Kelly Welch, Eileen Lind, Alessandro Villa
Published: 13 July 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-7; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1391-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Ali Khani Jeihooni, Samira Fatehi Dindarloo, Pouyan Afzali Harsini
Published: 11 July 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-8; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1396-7

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Mohtasham Ghaffari, Sanaz Nasiri Esfahani, Sakineh Rakhshanderou, Parisa Hosseini Koukamari
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-9; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1394-9

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Arthur M. Michalek
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-3; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1393-x

Rani Polak, Julia M. Reilly, Lauren E. Elson, Vanessa C. Gallegos-Kearin, Saurabha Bhatnagar, Jeffery C. Schneider, Julie K. Silver
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-5; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1384-y

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Michelle S. Williams, Ernest Kenu, Augustine Adanu, Ruth Angela Yalley, Nicholas Kwaku Lawoe, Akpanga Seyram Dotse, Rita Fosuah Adu, Kevin Fontaine
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-7; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1392-y

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Sally Temraz, Miza Salim Hammoud, Ahmad Saleh, Maya Charafeddine, Deborah Mukherji, Ali Shamseddine
Published: 28 June 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-8; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1389-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Anwar Alameer, Mohamed Salih Mahfouz, Yahya Alamir, Nasir Ali, Abdulaziz Darraj
Published: 27 June 2018
Journal of Cancer Education pp 1-6; doi:10.1007/s13187-018-1386-9

Abstract:Educational programs are important tools for breast cancer prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of health education in improving the knowledge and practices of female teachers regarding screening tools and the early detection of breast cancer. A two-group quasi-experimental design was conducted among 150 female teachers, who were selected from 75 schools of the Jazan General Administration of Education. Schools were chosen by a simple cluster randomization method and non-randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. Eligible participants were recruited by a simple randomization method, proportional to the total number of teachers at each school. Those in the intervention group (n = 75) were compared to the control group (n = 75) at baseline, as well as at 6 weeks and 3 months post-intervention. Knowledge of breast cancer screening tools was measured using a modified version of the Breast Cancer Knowledge test. Breast self-examination, clinical breast examination, and mammography practices were also measured. Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a statistically significant increase in knowledge and practice levels at both 6 weeks and 3 months post-intervention. Thus, the results of this study provide evidence that group health education programs are effective in improving breast cancer knowledge and practices in female teachers. Clinical Trial Registration number: NCT03398057.
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