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Journal Ecocycles

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63 articles
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János Csapó, Sándor Némethy
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 73-82; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i1.114

May East
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 58-74; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.106

Gábor Zs. Gyulai, Renee P. Malone, Mihály Czakó, Lilja Y Murenetz, Gábor Gyulai
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 46-57; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.105

Alice Kozumplíkova, Gabriela Chmelikova, Petra Hlavackova, Ondrej Konecny
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 23-32; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.109

Mohammed Khandaker, BenZ Kotzen
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 19-22; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.112

István Magyary
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 12-18; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.108

Boglarka Nagy
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 20-31; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i1.90

Abstract:The city of Auroville was founded in 1968 on the Coromandel Coast of South India. It has gone through exemplary landscape rejuvenation during the past decades. The once heavily eroded area has become a green biosphere. Conscious water management, reforestation, coastal protection, sustainable agriculture, a holistic urban plan and the use of alternative energy have been thoroughly researched and implemented in Auroville. Recent natural disasters have highlighted that the rehabilitated landscape and the conscious town planning of Auroville can offer certain protection from the impact of climate change. Auroville and its bioregion have experienced several natural disasters. A tsunami hit the coast in 2004, Hurricane Thane struck in 2012, a flood occurred in 2015, and a severe drought occurred in 2017. Over the last two decades, sea level rise and the disappearance of the coastline have been significant, as well as the intrusion of the seawater into the groundwater. Throughout these events Auroville environment remained noticeably more safe and healthy than its surrounding bioregions. Decades of cooperative projects with the villages in the bioregion have enabled Auroville to quickly act after disasters, avoiding aggravated situations such as outbreaks of epidemics. The achievements of Auroville can be a good example for cities of the Coromandel Coast and around the world.
Sakib Imtiaz
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 16-19; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i1.89

Abstract:Satellite remote sensing technique has been used to assess the vegetation cover changes experienced by areas severely affected by Rohingya refugees in Teknaf peninsula of Bangladesh which is bordering Myanmar. Since 25 August, 2017, approximately 655,000 refugees settled in Bangladesh as of 11 December 2017. Majority of them are settled in the sub-districts of Teknaf and Ukhiya. Teknaf peninsula is an ecologically critical area. It includes the protected Teknaf Wildlife Sanctuary, one of the oldest reserved forests in Bangladesh. This vegetation at the southern coast of Bangladesh plays a vital role in the climate change adaptation and mitigation process in the region. Refugee camps and their practice of cutting trees to use as firewood for cooking cause significant deforestation. This study shows a major loss of vegetation cover following the refugee influx. The analysis of the remote sensed images provides quantitative data on the adverse impact of the refugee crisis on the natural resources and the ecosystem of the host community.
Nicholas Imbeah, Zoltan Bujdoso
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 33-45; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.113

Giovanni Ruggieri, Patrizia Calò
Published: 1 January 2018
Ecocycles, Volume 4, pp 4-11; doi:10.19040/ecocycles.v4i2.102

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