Anglo-Saxon England

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0263-6751 / 1474-0532
Published by: Cambridge University Press (CUP) (10.1017)
Total articles ≅ 713
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Helen Appleton
Published: 1 December 2018
by 10.1017
Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 47, pp 275-305; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0263675119000061

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Christopher A. Jones
Published: 1 December 2018
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Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 47, pp 7-67; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0263675119000012

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Mark Griffith
Published: 1 December 2018
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Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 47, pp 69-176; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0263675119000024

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Roberta Frank
Published: 1 December 2018
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Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 47, pp 197-217; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0263675119000048

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Nicholas P. Schwartz
Published: 1 December 2018
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Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 47, pp 219-246; https://doi.org/10.1017/s026367511900005x

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Caroline Brett
Published: 1 December 2018
by 10.1017
Anglo-Saxon England, Volume 47, pp 247-273; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0263675119000097

Abstract:
This article discusses the similarity between two apparently unrelated hagiographical texts: Vita et Miracula Kenelmi, composed between 1045 and the 1080s and attributed to Goscelin of Saint-Bertin, and Vita Melori, composed perhaps in the 1060s–1080s but surviving only in a variety of late-medieval versions from England and France. Kenelm was venerated at Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, Melor chiefly at Lanmeur, Finistère. Both saints were reputed to be royal child martyrs, and their Vitae contain a sequence of motifs and miracles so similar that a textual relationship or common oral origin seems a reasonable hypothesis. In order to elucidate this, possible contexts for the composition of Vita Melori are considered, and evidence for the Breton contacts of Goscelin and, earlier, Winchcombe Abbey is investigated. No priority of one Vita over the other can be demonstrated, but their relationship suggests that there was more cultural contact between western Brittany and England from the mid-tenth to the twelfth centuries than emerges overtly in the written record.
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