Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 10699384 / 15315320
Current Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC (10.3758)
Total articles ≅ 3,393
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Latest articles in this journal

Brandon K. Ashinoff, Yehoshua Tsal, Carmel Mevorach
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review pp 1-1; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01673-y

Francesco Ianì
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review pp 1-20; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01674-x

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Birte Moeller, Christian Frings
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review pp 1-6; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01669-8

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Andrea Pittarello, Marcella Frătescu, Sebastiaan Mathôt
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1719-1728; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01638-1

Abstract:Recent work suggests that dishonesty results from ethical blind spots: people's lack of attention to ethical information. In two experiments (one pre-registered) we used eye tracking to investigate when ethical blind spots emerge, and whether they can be reduced through a simple, non-invasive intervention. Participants reported a Target Digit indicated by a jittery cue that was slightly biased in the direction of another digit (the Second-Cued Digit), which could be either higher or lower than the Target Digit. Participants were paid more for reporting higher digits, and were not penalized for making mistakes, thus providing an incentive to cheat. Results showed that participants frequently made self-serving (and rarely self-hurting) mistakes by reporting the Second-Cued Digit when it was more valuable than the target. Importantly, they rapidly gazed at the digit that they would later report, regardless of whether this report was correct or a self-serving mistake. Finally, we were able to reduce or increase the number of self-serving mistakes by respectively increasing or reducing the visual saliency of the Target Digit. We suggest that increasing the visual saliency of morally desirable options is a promising cost-effective tool to curb dishonesty.
Klaus Oberauer, Stephan Lewandowsky
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1596-1618; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01645-2

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Sarah-Elizabeth Byosiere, Philippe A. Chouinard, Tiffani J. Howell, Pauleen C. Bennett
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1641-1649; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01661-2

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Jordan Skrynka, Benjamin T. Vincent
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1729-1737; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01655-0

Abstract:How do our valuation systems change to homeostatically correct undesirable psychological or physiological states, such as those caused by hunger? There is evidence that hunger increases discounting for food rewards, biasing choices towards smaller but sooner food reward over larger but later reward. However, it is not understood how hunger modulates delay discounting for non-food items. We outline and quantitatively evaluate six possible models of how our valuation systems modulate discounting of various commodities in the face of the undesirable state of being hungry. With a repeated-measures design, an experimental hunger manipulation, and quantitative modeling, we find strong evidence that hunger causes large increases in delay discounting for food, with an approximately 25% spillover effect to non-food commodities. The results provide evidence that in the face of hunger, our valuation systems increase discounting for commodities, which cannot achieve a desired state change as well as for those commodities that can. Given that strong delay discounting can cause negative outcomes in many non-food (consumer, investment, medical, or inter-personal) domains, the present findings suggest caution may be necessary when making decisions involving non-food outcomes while hungry.
Elizabeth R. Schotter, Anna Marie Fennell
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1697-1704; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01662-1

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Romy J. Brinkman, J. Joris Hage, Roelof-Jan Oostra, Chantal M. Van Der Horst
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1588-1595; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01643-4

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Birte Moeller, Roland Pfister, Wilfried Kunde, Christian Frings
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 26, pp 1627-1632; doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01646-1

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