Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 10177833 / 13029657
Current Publisher: ScopeMed Publishing (10.5455)
Former Publisher: Yerkure Tanitim ve Yayincilik Hizmetleri (10.5350) , Informa UK Limited (10.1080)
Total articles ≅ 480
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Latest articles in this journal

Sevcan Karakoc, Osman Abalı, Sevcan Demirkaya
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20140107040932

Halil Ozcan, Elif Oral, Mustafa Güleç, Hasan Türkez, Mehmet Fatih Ustundag, Unsal Aydinoglu, Atakan Yucel
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20151201011430

Abstract:
Objective: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) that was categorized as a mood disorder in the most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders. In addition to a history of PMS, a PMDD diagnosis requires prospective symptom assessment for 2 consecutive months. Although the effects of some oxidants-antioxidants were previously studied in PMS, their possible effects in PMDD remain unknown. Paraoxonase-1 is a new high-density lipoprotein-associated enzyme with many antioxidative effects. We hypothesized that assessing serum total oxidant-antioxidant and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) levels could clarify the role of oxidant/antioxidant system in PMDD. Methods: All participants (n=50) were assessed by an experienced psychiatrist for PMDD by using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV), Premenstrual Assessment Form and Daily Record of Severity of Problems-Short Form (DRSP) or possible psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Serum estrogen, progesterone, total oxidant-antioxidant, and PON-1 levels were measured in the serum of 20 participants with PMDD and 30 asymptomatic controls during the follicular and luteal phases of two consecutive menstrual cycles. Sleep quality, depression, and anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), respectively. Results: There were no significant intergroup differences in estrogen, progesterone, oxidant-antioxidant, or PON-1 levels or PSQI scores. However, the mean HDRS and HARS scores were statistically significantly higher for patients with PMDD than for controls. Levels of estrogen, progesterone, and total oxidant-antioxidant were not correlated with HDRS, HARS, or PSQI scores. Conclusions: Considering the lack of differences in hormonal and biochemical levels between the two groups, it may be more efficient and discriminative to longitudinally assess biochemical and cellular stressrelated parameters in subjects with PMDD.Key words: estrogen, progesterone, oxidant, antioxidant, paraoxonase-1, premenstrual dysphoric disorder
Gokben Sayar, Mesut Cetin
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20150720010822

Necmettin Kocak, Cengizhan Acikel, Murat Gulsun, Hakan Istanbulluoglu, Barbaros Ozdemir, Emre Aydemir, Ercan Gocgeldi
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20150520120254

Ahmet Gul, Hesna Gul, Nurper Ozen, Salih Battal
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20160105112426

Kultegin Ogel, Ceren Koc, Serap Gorucu
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20160301092703

Oluwakanyinsola Salawu, Adeniyi Tijani, Madara Adamu, Samuel Okhale
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20160223122941

Deepak Narang, Sara Tomlinson, Darrell Mousseau, Andrew Holt, Glen Baker.
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20110403020951

Abstract:
The arylalkylamines β-phenylethylamine, m- and p-tyramine, tryptamine, m- and p-octopamine, phenylethanolamine and synephrine have been termed trace amines because of their low absolute concentrations in the central nervous system relative to the classical neurotransmitter amines noradrenaline, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin). Despite being present at low concentrations, these amines have been implicated in the etiology and pharmacotherapy of several psychiatric and neurological disorders. Studies on trace amines flourished in the 1970s and 1980s following the development of sensitive assays for these amines, and these were accompanied by comprehensive electrophysiological studies and some receptor binding studies. There has been a resurgence of interest in these amines in the past decade with the discovery and cloning of a unique family of G-protein-coupled receptors, some of which are selectively activated by trace amines; these receptors have been termed trace amine associated receptors (TAARs). The relevance of these receptors to the actions of the trace amines and to the actions of several other neurochemicals and psychotropic drugs is discussed.Key words: trace amine-associated receptors, β-phenylethylamine, tyramine, octopamine, tryptamine, psychiatric and neurological disorders
Ersin Aydın, Guldehan Atis, Abdullah Bolu, Cigdem Aydin, Ercan Karabacak, Bilal Dogan, Alpay Ates
Klinik Psikofarmakoloji Bülteni-Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology; doi:10.5455/bcp.20160205083722

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