International Journal of English Language Teaching

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2329-7913 / 2329-7921
Published by: Sciedu Press (10.5430)
Total articles ≅ 105
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Yang Tianfu, Wang Hongyuan
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v9n1p13

Abstract:
Currently, English learners in Chinese rural junior high schools have been increasingly focused by people in all walks of life, especially the government for they will function as an impetus to promote the construction as well as the growth of the new rural areas. Accordingly, this study will utilize the rural revitalization, a national strategy for rural areas to investigate some current situations on English learning self-efficacy of rural school students, which is an important factor affecting their learning, taking students of several rural middle schools in Suining, Sichuan province as participants and including the following research questions by virtue of the method of questionnaire, interview and literature analysis: 1) What is the current situation about English learning self-efficacy of rural junior high school students under the background of rural revitalization? 2) What factors can affect English learners’ learning self-efficacy against the background of rural revitalization? 3) Is there any positive or negative correlation between learners’ English learning self-efficacy and their academic achievements in the context of rural revitalization? Based on the outcomes of this research project, some valid and feasible strategies can be introduced to promote English learners’ self-efficacy and facilitate better achievements in English learning in rural junior high schools.
Kumari Damayanti Joshi, Laxman Gnawali, Ram Ashish Giri, Diane Mayer, Mary Dixon
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v9n1p25

Abstract:
Professional development for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers has gained increasing relevance worldwide. This study reports on issues of Nepalese EFL teachers’ professional development (needs, interests, enablers and barriers). Data from 257 EFL teachers were used to assess and explore these issues. Quantitative data were used to describe the needs, interests and their relationships with the teachers’ socio-demographics; while qualitative data were used for exploring the enablers of and barriers to teacher professional development. More than half of the teachers reported their professional development needs for various instructional skills to be high to very high. Similarly, more than two thirds of the teachers reported their PD interests for all professional development activities to be high to very high. The EFL teachers also highlighted a number of environmental, institutional and personal enabling and challenging factors in pursuing their professional development. This study concludes that Nepalese EFL teachers demonstrated a considerable need of and interest in TPD despite experiencing several types of challenges.
Tatiana Sallier, Tatiana Samsonova
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v9n1p40

Abstract:
The article is devoted to the role of grammar in an ESP class – to students who don’t specialize in English and need English primarily for professional reading. The authors argue that the most important language skill in English for special purposes in the framework of tertiary education is academic reading, which serves as a basis for developing academic speaking and academic writing skills. Teaching academic reading is impossible without a formal and systematic study of grammar. The principal grammatical phenomena needing special attention are outlined and several types of exercises which can be used in teaching grammar are recommended. It is shown that in some cases grammatical analysis provides cues for contextual guessing.
Susmita S. Shuvra, Sukanto Roy
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v9n1p46

Abstract:
Writing is the pivotal skill for the communicative purposes. In the tertiary level, the learners in Bangladesh encounter different types of problems in developing writing skills. However, this is very essential for them to recognize the problems and work out with that. This study is qualitative in nature, analyzes the problems in developing writing skills at the tertiary level in Bangladesh. This is based on secondary data. The data are collected from the other researchers’ research papers. Due to the pandemic situation, it could not be possible to collect primary data. The paper starts with describing the background of the writing skills, and approaches in Bangladesh. It also discussed the perspectives of the learners’ and teachers’ about the developing process of writing skills. Based on the previous research, it represents that lack of enthusiasm of instructors, lack of motivation of learners, institutional constraints hinder the process of developing writing skills at the tertiary level. The paper provides some proposals for resolving the problems that inhibit the process of developing writing skills. At last, this study suggested the implications of further research for identifying the other’s challenges and find out the infusion of the challenges. This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.
Cynthia Logogye, Bernard Asafo-Duho, Joseph B.A. Afful
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 9; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v9n1p1

Abstract:
This work analyses post-traumatic growth in Covid-19 addresses delivered to the people of Ghana by President Nana Akuffo Addo. We draw on Post-Traumatic Growth Theory to explain how Akuffo Addo constructs a new identity for himself and the nation in order to navigate through the pandemic and forge an agenda of growth and prosperity for Ghana. The study employs a linguistic content analysis approach. The data consists of twenty different speeches from the president to the people. The speeches are first analysed and coded manually for the five main tenets of Post-Traumatic Growth (PTG) identified in the updates. Consequently, the linguistic markers that are used in reconstructing the Ghanaian identity in response to the pandemic are delineated and mapped to the goals of the president using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count 2015 (LIWC2015; Pennebaker et al., 2015) software; a vocabulary analysis tool. The analysis showed that there was a high prevalence of personal pronoun use, use of positive-emotion words, and cognitive-processing words. This confirms our hypothesis that linguistic markers can be used to detect PTG.
Masood Monjezi
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p22

Abstract:
Writing in academia is not only a way for students to acquire knowledge and skills, but also a process through which they construct author/researcher identity. This study aims to explore how twenty MSc. students construct their identity as writers of research papers. The students in this study received genre-based writing instructions on writing research papers during their writing course in the first semester of university. They wrote four papers during the semester, and the researcher provided feedback to their papers. Then, they were interviewed individually in order to find out how they reacted to the instructions, the writing process, and the feedback provided by the teacher. In addition, they were requested to write a reflective piece of writing about what they experienced including their emotions, thoughts and opinions about writing an academic paper before and after the course. Two types of analyses were made. Firstly, their sample research papers were examined during the course to see if there were improvements in the areas where feedback was provided. Secondly, the interviews and reflective pieces of writing were subjected to content analysis in order to extract themes. The examination of the papers revealed that the feedback provided by the teacher was effective as the writings improved in the areas where feedback was given. The thematic analysis resulted in two major themes of Affect and Attitude and the Need for Adaptation. An important implication of this study was the role feedback played in helping student/researchers to develop their identity in writing.
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p10

Abstract:
Studies with proficient users of English suggest that readers demonstrate deeper comprehension of texts when reading non-linear hypertexts than when reading linear texts. This is attributed to the networked nature of texts that helps readers exercise cognitive flexibility. An aspect that remains largely unresearched is the potential of linear online texts to facilitate comprehension in readers who are non-proficient users of English. Keeping in mind the fact that a majority of readers reading online texts in English can be hindered by three types of comprehension deficits – low levels of language proficiency, non-availability of prior knowledge, or both – this study investigated the interactive effects of two salient features of online texts, viz., non-linearity in the presentation of text and the availability of additional sources of information, on the reading comprehension of ESL readers. Two groups of readers with high and low levels of English proficiency read twelve texts on familiar and unfamiliar topics in print, linear online, and non-linear online modes. A comparison of readers’ responses to comprehension questions and free recalls showed that those with low linguistic competence and/or topic familiarity were able to achieve better comprehension of linear online texts than print texts or non-linear online texts. The findings indicate that text linearity when combined with the presence of multiple information resources (both provided by the author within the text and freely available on the internet) might have the potential to scaffold linguistic and content knowledge deficits in ESL readers and promote deep levels of comprehension.
Abdullah Alazemi, Ahmad F. Alnwaiem, Abdullah A. Alenezi
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p1

Abstract:
This study explored the use of students’ L1 (Arabic) in one of Kuwait’s public institutions—namely, the Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (PAAET). The purpose of this study was three-fold: (1) to look at the functions of using L1, (2) to explore any comprehensibility issues and/or academic gains, and (3) to investigate any psychological issues students face when not using L1. The study employed a two-stage data collection phase, where a total of 278 students participated in the closed-ended questionnaire and 6 students participated in the semi-structured interviews. The results showed that students attach several important aspects to the use of L1 in their L2 classrooms. Students expressed that the inclusion of Arabic eases their intake from lectures and allows them to better understand the lectures’ content. However, the findings also indicated that students object to the overreliance on Arabic and instead prefer that teachers strike a balance between L1 and L2 use to maximize their learning.
Liu Yan
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p41

Abstract:
American Writer Mark Twain in his works vividly records social changes caused by the industrialization in the 19th century. His writing could be regarded as a kind of construction of Americanism. He insists on advocating of Puritanism, using the American dialect to tell American stories, displaying the culture in American West and South. He employs humor and irony to combine American history with reality, getting rid of influences of the British literature to illustrate Americanism and the historical process of America.
Yuqiao Liu, Hongyuan Wang
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p32

Abstract:
The Chinese government has proposed the rural vitalization strategy in its poverty reduction, aiming at narrowing the discrepancies in economic levels between urban and rural areas. Under this development blueprint, poverty alleviation through education, one of the imperative approaches mentioned in this overarching strategy, has attracted attention from all sectors of Chinese society. In Southwest China, however, the urban-rural gap in compulsory education is still concerning, especially in English teaching and learning. This has lowered the overall quality of English education in these areas, whereas only a few studies have looked into this issue. Therefore, under the guidance of the rural vitalization strategy, the present study intends to offer a response by calling for more attention on the problems in rural English teaching in various aspects. Furthermore, this study explores the corresponding strategies adopted to solve these problems and discusses their effectiveness of English teaching. It is hoped that the study can develop a theoretical framework about the current issues of English teaching in rural areas under the rural vitalization and can provide practical suggestions for policymakers and educational practitioners.
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