International Journal of English Language Teaching

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2329-7913 / 2329-7921
Published by: Sciedu Press (10.5430)
Total articles ≅ 97
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Liu Yan
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p41

Abstract:
American Writer Mark Twain in his works vividly records social changes caused by the industrialization in the 19th century. His writing could be regarded as a kind of construction of Americanism. He insists on advocating of Puritanism, using the American dialect to tell American stories, displaying the culture in American West and South. He employs humor and irony to combine American history with reality, getting rid of influences of the British literature to illustrate Americanism and the historical process of America.
Yuqiao Liu, Hongyuan Wang
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n2p32

Abstract:
The Chinese government has proposed the rural vitalization strategy in its poverty reduction, aiming at narrowing the discrepancies in economic levels between urban and rural areas. Under this development blueprint, poverty alleviation through education, one of the imperative approaches mentioned in this overarching strategy, has attracted attention from all sectors of Chinese society. In Southwest China, however, the urban-rural gap in compulsory education is still concerning, especially in English teaching and learning. This has lowered the overall quality of English education in these areas, whereas only a few studies have looked into this issue. Therefore, under the guidance of the rural vitalization strategy, the present study intends to offer a response by calling for more attention on the problems in rural English teaching in various aspects. Furthermore, this study explores the corresponding strategies adopted to solve these problems and discusses their effectiveness of English teaching. It is hoped that the study can develop a theoretical framework about the current issues of English teaching in rural areas under the rural vitalization and can provide practical suggestions for policymakers and educational practitioners.
Abderrahim Bouderbane
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n1p1

Abstract:
The present study is a comparison between the impact of rhetorical argumentation and narrating stories on students’ fluency and accuracy in communicative competence. We aimed at evaluating the usefulness and suitability of these tasks, and their efficiency when it comes to teaching fluency and accuracy by analysing the direct effects of the tasks on the indices of fluency and accuracy. The problematic issue in this research investigates the effects of the task rhetorical argumentation, and whether it is an important task that teachers should rely on it in teaching speaking in academic contexts. The sample is composed of 65 students which are divided in between 30 students in the control group and 35 students in experimental group. The data was collected by a test which was used to evaluate three main areas which are: classroom interaction, topic knowledge and language knowledge. The results of the experiment show that there are two types of fluency which are procedural and automatic. Rhetorical argumentation can be used to develop procedural fluency, and not automatic since the task is considered as difficult and students were not familiar with it.
Metin Esen
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n1p23

Abstract:
We all live in a globalised world today, and even the smallest interactions taking place in our daily lives can now take place in a global level thanks to the advancements in telecommunication facilities. To keep up with these intercultural interactions, whether virtually or in real life, people now need some abilities for effective communication and cooperation, and 21st Century Skills are a way to address this need. Among these skills, critical thinking – clear and rational thinking, might be a helpful way of approaching issues arising from intercultural communication and guiding learners in developing their intercultural communication and interaction skills. Both of these competences are used in the area of teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL), in textbooks, materials, and assessment tools. This article review aims at scanning the literature to find traces of different uses of the skill of critical thinking and intercultural competence in the EFL context to tackle issues resulting from intercultural communication or develop language learners’ intercultural competence. The study also intends to classify these uses by analysing similar patterns in the studies investigated. The review explores 14 studies discussing these two competences in the EFL context and determines three distinct approaches by the researchers.
Zheng Wu, Shaohua Jiang
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v8n1p11

Abstract:
This article is in line with the initiatives of “supporting the disadvantaged” and “developing the cause of persons with disabilities” proposed by UNESCO. With using “deaf students” and “English teaching” as the key research terms, efforts are put into searching research in the Web of Science (WOS) core collection database from the year 2000 to 2020. The index results are sorted by publication years, authors, institutions, sources and keywords. Then these statistics are visualized by CiteSpace software in five aspects, including authors, institutions, journal sources and keywords. In total, there include 4866 articles abroad in this study. The number of articles published at home and abroad show an increasing trend. These collected researches focus on the teaching method, teaching strategy, cognitive condition, sign language teaching, and cochlear implant in English teaching for deaf students. The foreign ones emphasize on ability of deaf students themselves and influence force of auxiliary tool. The overall research on English language teaching for deaf students is on the rise, and the research contents and hot topics international literature are somewhat overlapped while somewhat different. The team cooperation and international exchange should be strengthened while complementing each other, in order to promote the overall development of this field.
Yuichi Todaka
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v7n2p24

Abstract:
This study is part of a five-year consecutive study designed to help college freshmen change their view of English learning as a tedious activity to one where they see it as a lifelong enriching experience. In the first two studies we focused on self-efficacy sources. In the third study we added focus on the development of future EFL selves with image training. We then shifted our attention toward the establishment of concrete and fun English study reasons that are associated with students' hobbies and interests using YouTube videos as authentic learning support material outside the classroom. In these studies we were able to help our students improve their English listening skills during the spring semester, but those students were unable to maintain that proficiency level over the summer breaks or during the subsequent fall semester. Thus, in this present study, we added explicit instruction on how to access and make use of certain YouTube sites in order to improve English listening skills. Based on our findings, this most recent method helped our freshmen significantly improve their English skills, even during the spring semester and summer break, and for the most part improve their English listening skills during the fall semester as well.
Yangyang Lu
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v7n2p16

Abstract:
With the rapid growth of academic cooperation of medical science between China and the world, there has been an increasing demand of intercultural communication in English for medical purposes (EMP) in China. For a long time, people in China have attached importance to reading and writing in EMP while neglecting the listening and speaking ability of medical students. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the situation of intercultural communication between Chinese doctors and foreign patients and explain the significance of verbal communication in EMP. Based on data collected from discourse cases in Chinese medical settings, this paper demonstrates that EMP in China should pay more attention to the three critical elements: medical jargon, contextualized language, and cultural difference, and analyzes the significance of three elements through qualitative research. This paper also explores underlying reasons of intercultural communication failure between Chinese doctors and foreign patients, and helps to develop the idea that EMP teaching in China should not be silent.
Daniel Costa
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v7n2p60

Abstract:
The purpose of this research study was to delve into Business English learners’ perceptions of synchronous online tuition and its potential as a substitute for face-to-face tuition in a one-to-one educational context. It involved nine French-speaking students spanning different proficiency levels and who completed at least a course consisting of twenty lessons which involved voice and text-based communication using Cisco Webex Meeting Center. They were asked to complete questionnaires and to attend semi-structured interviews in French, which were recorded and transcribed.The results show that the learners were generally pleased with the course and its medium. They commented on its flexibility both in terms of space and time, the former enabling them to have lessons from their office or home and the latter allowing them to schedule lessons according to their schedules. The respondents believed that the voice-based nature of the medium was effective in enhancing their listening and speaking skills, but not all acknowledged the benefits of text-based communication. Technical issues were considered a hindrance by several participants, while digital literacy, learning disabilities and learning styles were alluded to as factors which could affect the learning process. Blended learning was suggested to include further practice with colleagues or face-to-face tuition.
Mary Susan Anyiendah, Paul A. Odundo, Agnes Kibuyi
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v7n2p45

Abstract:
Word recognition is one of the comprehension processing skills encapsulated by the interactive approach instruction. Word recognition skills enable readers to understand the meaning of comprehension passages by decoding the sound of new words. Learners in Vihiga County perform poorer in English language examinations than their peers in neighbouring counties. The performance is weaker in comprehension than in grammar sections of the English paper. Despite this, there is paucity of empirical information about the nexus between activation of word recognition skills and learners’ achievement in reading comprehension in the County. This study applied the Solomon Four-Group Design to source data from 279 primary school learners and 8 teachers in 2017. Multiple linear regression was used to generate two models, one for the experimental group (Model 1) and one for the control group (Model 2). Key results show that the influence of word recognition skills on learners’ achievement in reading comprehension was statistically significant in both groups. However, the effect was stronger in the experimental than in the control group, suggests that training teachers in the experimental group enabled learners in that group to perform better than their colleagues in the control group. Thus, activation of learners’ word recognition skills is likely to improve achievement in reading comprehension.
Lina Mukhopadhyay
International Journal of English Language Teaching, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.5430/ijelt.v7n2p1

Abstract:
In this paper, a series of ESL classroom observations of a teacher in an Indian primary level government run school are presented to show concrete uses of translanguaging. Translanguaging practices were based on the inputs the teacher received from a training programme on using multilingual strategies to teach language and content. It is observed that the teacher applies translanguaging to clarify concepts using contrastive elaboration, instruct students, practice discourse based management, prepare students for classroom activities, and help them communicate. She also reflects upon her experience of translanguaging which shows her plans to use students’ L1 more systematically like by drawing lexical and form based comparisons between Telugu, Hindi (L1s) and English. Instances of use of translanguaging or fluid ways of communicating using two or three languages by this teacher and her experiences in using this approach help in validating the concept for advancing school skills in students from low SES groups who would have not otherwise been able to understand the lessons if taught in the strict monolingual mode.
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