Vision Research

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ISSN / EISSN : 0042-6989 / 0042-6989
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 15,530
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Published: 24 January 2022
Vision Research, Volume 193; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2022.108011

Abstract:
Facial skin tone recognition provides significant social and ecological information to humans. This study utilized a five-alternative forced-choice test design wherein participants were asked to judge which color (red, yellow, green, blue, or white) they perceived as too strong in stimulus skin tone images. The results showed that the participants’ reference point of facial skin tone judgement was closer to the centroid facial skin tone observed on a daily basis than the chromaticity of measured or remembered facial skin tones of the observer. This result was similar for observers from Japan and the United Kingdom. The distance between the reference point of facial skin tone judgment and the average skin chromaticity of each local group was smaller when the stimulus image was recognized as a face compared to when a uniform facial skin tone patch was used. Therefore, humans unconsciously memorize the facial skin tones they encounter in daily life and judge facial skin tones based on the centroid. Furthermore, it is critical to recognize an image as a face for the evaluation of facial skin tone.
Jessica M. Dukes, , Challee D. Shartzer
Published: 11 January 2022
Vision Research, Volume 194; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2021.107992

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, Giulio Contemori, Elena Marini, Luca Battaglini
Published: 6 January 2022
Vision Research, Volume 193; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2021.107979

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, Takao Sato
Published: 5 January 2022
Vision Research, Volume 194; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2021.107993

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, E. Battegay, D. Schmidt, M. Cheetham
Published: 31 December 2021
Vision Research, Volume 193; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2021.107994

Abstract:
The neural response in the human visual system is composed of magno-, parvo- and koniocellular input from the retina. Signal differences from functional imaging between health and individuals with a cognitive weakness are attributed to a dysfunction of a specific retinal input. Yet, anatomical interconnections within the human visual system obscure individual contribution to the neural response in V1. Deflections in the visual evoked potential (VEP) arise from an interaction between electric dipoles, their strength determined by the size of the neural population active during temporal - and spatial luminance contrast processing. To investigate interaction between these neural responses, we recorded the VEP over visual cortex of 14 healthy adults viewing four series of windmill patterns. Within a series, the relative area white in a pattern varied systematically. Between series, the number of sectors across which this area was distributed doubled. These patterns were viewed as pattern alternating and on-/off stimuli. P100/P1 amplitude increased linearly with the relative area white in the pattern, while N135/N1 and P240/P2 amplitude increased with the number of sectors of which the area white was distributed. The decreases P100 amplitude with increasing number of sectors is attributed to an interaction between electric dipoles located in granular and supragranular layers of V1. Differences between the VEP components obtained during a pattern reversing display and following pattern onset are accounted for by the transient and sustained nature of neural responses processing temporal - and spatial luminance contrast and ability of these responses to manifest in the VEP.
Kerri Brown
Published: 23 December 2021
Vision Research, Volume 190; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0042-6989(21)00235-2

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