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ISSN / EISSN : 0008-543X / 1097-0142
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1002)
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Soyoun Rachel Kim, Alicia Tone, Raymond H. Kim Md, Matthew Cesari, Blaise A. Clarke, Lua Eiriksson, , Melyssa Aronson Ms, Spring Holter, Alice Lytwyn, et al.
Published: 13 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer; doi:10.1002/cncr.33625

Abstract:
BACKGROUND Despite recommendations for reflex immunohistochemistry (IHC) for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins to identify Lynch syndrome (LS), the uptake of genetic assessment by those who meet referral criteria is low. The authors implemented a comprehensive genetic navigation program to increase the uptake of genetic testing for LS in patients with endometrial cancer (EC) or nonserous/nonmucinous ovarian cancer (OC). METHODS Participants with newly diagnosed EC or OC were prospectively recruited from 3 cancer centers in Ontario, Canada. Family history questionnaires were used to assess LS‐specific family history. Reflex IHC for MMR proteins was performed with the inclusion of clinical directives in pathology reports. A trained genetic navigator initiated a genetic referral on behalf of the treating physician and facilitated genetic referrals to the closest genetics center. RESULTS A total of 841 participants (642 with EC, 172 with OC, and 27 with synchronous EC/OC) consented to the study; 194 (23%) were MMR‐deficient by IHC. Overall, 170 women (20%) were eligible for a genetic assessment for LS: 35 on the basis of their family history alone, 24 on the basis of their family history and IHC, 82 on the basis of IHC alone, and 29 on the basis of clinical discretion. After adjustments for participants who died (n = 6), 149 of 164 patients (91%) completed a genetic assessment, and 111 were offered and completed genetic testing. Thirty‐four women (4.0% of the total cohort and 30.6% of those with genetic testing) were diagnosed with LS: 5 with mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), 9 with mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), 15 with mutS homolog 6 (MSH6), and 5 with PMS2. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of a navigated genetic program resulted in a high rate of genetic assessment (>90%) in patients with gynecologic cancer at risk for LS.
Kenechukwu Chudy‐Onwugaje, , L. Joseph Su, Mark P. Purdue, Christine C. Johnson, Lingxiao Wang, Hormuzd A. Katki, Kathryn Hughes Barry, Sonja I. Berndt
Published: 11 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer; doi:10.1002/cncr.33623

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Janet R. Cummings, Ann C. Mertens, Hefei Wen,
Published: 11 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer; doi:10.1002/cncr.33634

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Fenqiang Xiao, Yang Zheng, Yushi Lin, Hong‐Liang Wang
Published: 11 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer; doi:10.1002/cncr.33628

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Peter Reichardt
Published: 11 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer; doi:10.1002/cncr.33630

Abstract:
Before the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), the overall survival of patients with advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was 10 to 20 months because of the lack of approved therapies. In the last 20 years, a treatment algorithm for patients with advanced GISTs, which includes imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib as first‐, second‐, and third‐line therapies, respectively, has been established. Recently, 2 new TKIs have been approved: ripretinib for fourth‐line therapy and avapritinib as first‐line therapy in patients harboring platelet‐derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) exon 18 D842V mutations. Additionally, there are several experimental therapies under investigation that could advance individualized patient care. All of these therapies have varying efficacies and safety profiles that warrant an updated treatment landscape review. This review article summarizes the efficacy and safety data currently available for conventional TKIs along with recently approved and experimental therapies.
, Kimberly A. Miller, Michael A. Hoyt, Anamara Ritt‐Olson
Published: 11 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer; doi:10.1002/cncr.33633

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 10 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer, Volume 127, pp 1721-1730; doi:10.1002/cncr.32311

Carrie Printz
Published: 10 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer, Volume 127, pp 1731-1733; doi:10.1002/cncr.33631

Carrie Printz
Published: 10 May 2021
by Wiley
Cancer, Volume 127, pp 1733-1733; doi:10.1002/cncr.33632

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