Journal of Health Communication

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ISSN / EISSN : 1081-0730 / 1087-0415
Published by: Informa UK Limited (10.1080)
Total articles ≅ 2,339
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Journal of Health Communication pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2022.2029978

Abstract:
Online health information-seeking behavior (OHIS) has been typically operationalized in an aggregate form representing either depth (e.g., how long) or breadth (e.g., how much) of seeking, which is irrespective of what types of information are sought. Recognizing limitations of such practice, this research employs cluster analysis to reflect the content and types of health information sought in studying OHIS. Three online studies providing participants with opportunities to actually seek information about meningitis (Study 1; N = 408), Alzheimer’s disease (Study 2; N = 190), and cancer (Study 3; N = 208) recorded the participants’ information-seeking activities unobtrusively. Across the three studies, cluster analysis identified three common clusters representing distinctive information-seeking patterns (i.e., combinations of different types of information sought): One cluster sought information on “overview,” the second one focused on “protection” information, and the third cluster sought “all” types of information provided. The relative preference for these types of information was predicted by several antecedents of information-seeking behavior proposed in Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking (CMIS) including age, fear, self- and response-efficacy. The findings demonstrate the utility of taking the actual content or types of health information sought into consideration and suggest several fruitful avenues it paves for future research on OHIS.
, Annemarie Wiedicke, Sophia Schaller, ,
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.2020381

Abstract:
Responsibility frames potentially shape the public perception of health issues such as obesity, diabetes, or mental illness, specifically regarding responsibility attributions for their causes and treatment. Which responsibility frames prevail in the health context, and the responses they may elicit from audiences, has not been studied systematically. This systematic review includes studies with different methodological approaches published between 2004 and 2019 (N = 68). Content analyses (n = 56) show that different media attribute health responsibility most frequently, but not exclusively to individuals. Individual responsibility was especially emphasized for obesity, which was also the most studied health issue. Tendencies toward societal attributions of responsibility emerged over time, particularly regarding health risks for which the frames describe a specific cause (e.g., sugar, trans-fat). Experimental studies (n = 12) indicate that individual responsibility frames reduce policy support. The effects of responsibility frames were, however, not as clear-cut as expected with research gaps regarding behavioral and affective outcomes. Overall, there is a clear emphasis on noncommunicable diseases in this field. Finally, the conceptual focus on individual vs. societal health responsibility distracts from social network influences as another relevant health determinant. The implications for health communication are discussed.
Kamila Janmohamed, Nathan Walter, Kate Nyhan, Kaveh Khoshnood, Joseph D Tucker, Natalie Sangngam, , Qinglan Ding, Allie Wong, Zachary M. Schwitzky, et al.
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.2021460

Abstract:
The duration and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic depends largely on individual and societal actions which are influenced by the quality and salience of the information to which they are exposed. Unfortunately, COVID-19 misinformation has proliferated. Despite growing attempts to mitigate COVID-19 misinformation, there is still uncertainty regarding the best way to ameliorate the impact of COVID-19 misinformation. To address this gap, the current study uses a meta-analysis to evaluate the relative impact of interventions designed to mitigate COVID-19-related misinformation. We searched multiple databases and gray literature from January 2020 to September 2021. The primary outcome was COVID-19 misinformation belief. We examined study quality and meta-analysis was used to pool data with similar interventions and outcomes. 16 studies were analyzed in the meta-analysis, including data from 33378 individuals. The mean effect size of interventions to mitigate COVID-19 misinformation was positive, but not statistically significant [d = 2.018, 95% CI (−0.14, 4.18), p = .065, k = 16]. We found evidence of publication bias. Interventions were more effective in cases where participants were involved with the topic, and where text-only mitigation was used. The limited focus on non-U.S. studies and marginalized populations is concerning given the greater COVID-19 mortality burden on vulnerable communities globally. The findings of this meta-analysis describe the current state of the literature and prescribe specific recommendations to better address the proliferation of COVID-19 misinformation, providing insights helpful to mitigating pandemic outcomes.
James M. Bishop, Francis J. Real, Skye L. McDonald, Melissa Klein, Dominick DeBlasio, Jessica A. Kahn, ,
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.2021459

Abstract:
Missed clinical opportunities and the lack of strong and consistent vaccine recommendations are key reasons for low HPV vaccination rates. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot evaluation of a web-based training’s impact on knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy related to providing evidence-based HPV vaccine recommendations. Participants completed three online interactive learning modules and the HPV Vaccine: Same Way, Same Day™ smartphone application (app). Participants completed a pre-training survey, immediate post-training survey, and two-month post-survey. Participants demonstrated a statistically significant increase in knowledge scores from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. Mean attitudes for recommending HPV vaccination for female patients increased from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. Mean attitudes for recommending HPV vaccination for male patients increased from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. Mean self-efficacy scores increased from T1 to T2 and T1 to T3. The HPV Vaccine: Same Way, Same Day™ app is a promising strategy for improving HPV vaccine recommendations among physicians. Future research should explore long-term effects and enroll attending and community physicians to examine its efficacy in other physician populations.
, Junghee Kim
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.2015643

Abstract:
The literature has indicated that higher smoking media literacy (i.e., SML) can buffer adverse effects of exposure to pro-smoking media content (i.e., PMC) on smoking-related outcomes in adolescence. Thus, we aimed to investigate (a) SML levels among Korean adolescents and (b) relationships of SML with smoking behavior, attitudes, and susceptibility. In 2017, we collected cross-sectional data from nine middle or high schools in Korea, using a convenience sampling method (N = 476). For the first aim, we calculated the average score of SML. For the second aim, we conducted multinomial logistic regression (MLR), multiple linear regression, and binary multiple logistic regression. Additionally, we conducted Firth logistic regression and confirmed the robustness of our findings obtained from the MLR. The average SML score was 6.48 out of 10 points, indicating that our respondents’ average SML was slightly above the middle level. In addition, after adjusting for factors potentially affecting associations between SML and the three smoking-related outcomes, we found significant protective relationships of SML with all smoking-related outcomes: smoking behavior, attitudes, and susceptibility. Given our findings, the enhancement of SML through education should be considered an important strategy to weaken the link between exposure to PMC and smoking-related outcomes.
, Jiyeon Lee, Jongeun Heo, Jinha Baek
Published: 13 December 2021
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.2015644

Abstract:
Using content analysis, this study examined the effects of several messaging strategies in YouTube videos promoting human papillomavirus vaccines in Korea. It analyzed a total of 201 videos, focusing on five message strategies—temporal framing, narrative format, gain-loss framing, emotional appeals, and message sensation value. The analysis revealed that the creators of these YouTube videos frequently utilized all of these strategies, except for emotional appeals. It also showed that present-focused framing was effective in eliciting positive responses from viewers, and not including gain-loss framing was more effective in provoking responses. Meanwhile, message sensation values were found to increase both positive and negative viewer responses.
, Emily Moyer-Gusé
Published: 22 November 2021
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.2002981

Abstract:
This study examines the effectiveness of evoking other-oriented emotions in vaccine messages to promote vaccine advocacy behaviors. A between-subject experiment with a parent sample was conducted, in which portrayals of a victim exemplar (someone who is suffering from the consequence of vaccine hesitancy) and a moral exemplar (someone who is selflessly helping others) were varied. Results showed that the victim exemplar led to greater empathy, and the moral exemplar led to greater elevation, both of which predicted vaccine advocacy responses. Implications of the findings and future directions were discussed.
, , Lizette Avina, Gabriel Cortez, Ryane Daniels,
Published: 15 November 2021
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.1998845

Abstract:
Traditional health education efforts rarely align with youth social justice values. The Bigger Picture (TBP), a spoken word arts campaign, leverages a social justice approach to activate youth around the social determinants of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This quasi-experimental study examines the impact of embedding TBP in urban, low-income high schools (3 intervention schools received TBP; 3 comparison schools received a non-health related spoken word program) with respect to (1) health-related mind-sets and expectations; (2) sense of belonging; and (3) civic engagement among youth. Adults and youth who participated in programming at all 6 schools were interviewed, and a content analysis of students’ poems was performed. TBP was well-received by adults and students. While students in both TBP and comparison programs described multiple social determinants of T2D, intervention students more frequently articulated the connections between race/ethnicity and T2D as a social justice issue. Further, all comparison students explicitly mentioned individual dietary behavior as a T2D determinant while most, yet not all, intervention students did. Students in both programs reported a high sense of belonging at school and confidence in civic engagement. Content analysis of TBP students’ poems revealed youth’s detailed understanding of T2D determinants. Future studies might explore program scalability, and how the integration of civic engagement opportunities into TBP curriculum might impact students’ capacity to create positive social change.
Published: 14 November 2021
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.1998844

Abstract:
Advance care planning (ACP) is the process of communicating about end-of-life (EOL) care with loved ones. Due to the deadly nature of COVID-19, ACP is vital. Unfortunately, fewer than 30% of American patients engage in ACP. In addition to low motivation, people experiencing death anxiety (DA) similarly avoid ACP. This finding coincides with predictions from terror management theory (TMT) that people avoid DA-arousing behaviors. Guided by the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the health belief model (HBM), we posited COVID-19 risk perceptions would be positively associated with determinants of health behavior, including intention to share and ask loved ones about EOL wishes, as well as the associated attitudes, norms, and level of perceived behavioral control regarding ACP. Guided by TMT, we posited that DA negatively mediated relationships between COVID-19 risk perceptions and these behavioral determinants. An MTurk participant sample (N = 522) completed a survey about COVID-19 risk perceptions, DA, and health behavior determinants in the context of ACP. Results indicate COVID-19 risk perceptions were rarely directly related to these determinants. However, results of PROCESS mediation models examining the role of DA in these relationships reveal a different picture. While direct relationships were rarely significant, DA negatively mediated most relationships between COVID-19 risk perceptions and behavioral determinants. Our results indicate DA demotivates EOL communication during the COVID-19 pandemic; a concerning yet important finding due to the increased importance of ACP in the context of a deadly disease like COVID-19.
Jisoo Ahn, , , Lucy Atkinson,
Published: 14 November 2021
Journal of Health Communication pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.1999348

Abstract:
This study examines the emotional mechanisms of how public trust in the governments’ actions to address the COVID-19 pandemic shapes individuals’ risk information-seeking and avoidance. To make cross-cultural comparisons, we conducted a multi-country survey early in the pandemic in South Korea, the United States (US) and Singapore. The results suggest that trust was negatively related to fear, anger, sadness and anxiety, and positively related to hope. These emotions were significant mediators of the effect of trust on information seeking and avoidance, except for anger on avoidance. Importantly, the indirect effects of trust in government varied by country. Fear was a stronger mediator between trust and information seeking in South Korea than in the US. In contrast, sadness and anger played more prominent mediating roles in Singapore than in South Korea. This study offers theoretical insights into better understanding the roles of discrete emotions in forming information behaviors. The findings of this study also inform communication strategies that seek to navigate trust in managing pandemics that impact multiple nations.
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