Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1121-2233 / 2421-4248
Current Publisher: Pacini editore srl (10.15167)
Total articles ≅ 23
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
PUBMED
MEDLINE
MEDICUS
PMC
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SHERPA/ROMEO
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D Orsini
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

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Ma Behzadifar, M Martini, Me Behzadifar, N L Bragazzi
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

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N Riccardi, D Canetti, M Martini, M M Diaw, A Di Biagio, L Codecasa, I Barberis, N L Bragazzi, G Besozzi
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

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Giancarlo Icardi, Mariano Martini, Giorgio Besozzi, Valentina Gazzaniga
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

N L Bragazzi, M Martini, N Mahroum
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

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M Martini, N Riccardi, A Giacomelli, V Gazzaniga, G Besozzi
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

I Buzic, V Giuffra
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 61

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S. Scuri, F. Petrelli, T.T.C. Nguyen, I. Grappasonni
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 60; doi:10.15167/2421-4248/jpmh2019.60.1.1134

Abstract:
Few studies focus on the role training has on rescue workers who are active as volunteers or actual workers in emergency situations such as an earthquake. In October 2016, a strong earthquake hit Central Italy and in particular the province of Macerata in the Marche region. Lots of rescuers were called to deal with the emergency. The aim of this study was, therefore, to examine their preparation, studying resilience and coping strategies, as these qualities can protect against complications brought on by traumatic situations (post traumatic stress disorder). An observational study on 70 rescue workers who active in the area affected by the disaster within the province of Macerata was carried out. The questionnaire proposed by the Coping Inventory for Stressful situations (CISS) was used, while individual resilience levels were measured with the Resilience Scale. Both methods were employed in two separate interviews conducted before and after their intervention in the disaster area. To verify a possible difference between the resilience and coping values before and after the activity of rescue effort, the paired Student t test was applied. The sample showed medium to high levels of coping (91.6%) and resilience (89.6%) were present in both interviews and not significant statistical differences was observed for the resilience (among females t = 1.63, p-value = 0.179, and among males (t = -0.76; p-value = 0.487). In contrast, CISS scores before and after the rescue effort showed significant statistical differences both among females (t = 4.81; p-value = 0.009) and males (t = 10.06; p-value = 0.001).Some areas relative to coping mechanisms, such as social avoidance and distraction are preferred by women, while men prefer avoidance and task-oriented activity. Results for resilience show a slight difference for perseverance in men. The ability to use mechanisms of self-preservation like coping and resilience helps rescue workers to better respond in emergency situations. Surely one of the most appropriate ways to reach this result is provided by their preparation.
C. Genovese, I.A.M. Picerno, G. Trimarchi, G. Cannavò, G. Egitto, B. Cosenza, V. Merlina, G. Icardi, D. Panatto, D. Amicizia, et al.
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 60; doi:10.15167/2421-4248/jpmh2019.60.1.1097

Abstract:
In recent years, a phenomenon known as "vaccine hesitancy" has spread throughout the world, even among health workers, determining a reduction in vaccination coverage (VC).A study aimed at evaluating VC among healthcare workers (HCWs) in 10 Italian cities (L'Aquila, Genoa, Milan, Palermo, Sassari, Catanzaro, Ferrara, Catania, Naples, Messina) was performed. Annex 3 of the Presidential Decree n. 445 of 28 December 2000 was used to collect information on the vaccination status of HCWs. The mean and standard deviation (SD) were calculated with regard to the quantitative variable (age), while absolute and relative frequencies were obtained for categorical data (sex, professional profile, working sector, vaccination status). The connection between VC and the categorical variables was evaluated by chi-square method (statistical significance at p < 0.05). The statistical analyses were performed by SPSS and Stata software. A total of 3,454 HCWs participated in the project: 1,236 males and 2,218 females.The sample comprised: physicians (26.9%), trainee physicians (16.1%), nurses (17.2%) and other professional categories (9.8%). Low VC was generally recorded. Higher VC was found with regard to polio, hepatitis B, tetanus and diphtheria, while coverage was very low for measles, mumps, rubella, pertussis, chickenpox and influenza (20-30%). This study revealed low VC rates among HCWs for all the vaccinations. Measures to increase VC are therefore necessary in order to prevent HCWs from becoming a source of transmission of infections with high morbidity and/or mortality both within hospitals and outside.
V.H. Nguyen, D.A. Do, T.T.H. Do, T.M.A. Dao, B.G. Kim, T.H. Phan, T.H. Doan, N.K. Luong, T.L. Nguyen, V.M. Hoang, et al.
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene, Volume 60; doi:10.15167/2421-4248/jpmh2019.60.1.942

Abstract:
Since Vietnam has signed WHO framework on tobacco control (FCTC) in 2003 and has issued tobacco control law in 2013, there has been little research concerning about what impacts smoke-free regulations have had on public compliance. The objective of this study was to assess public exposure to secondhand smoke and reaction toward smoke-free policy regulations in Vietnam and the associated factor. Using the design of GATS (Global Adult Tobacco Survey), a nationally representative sample of 8,996 adults were approached for data collection. Logistic regression was used to examine the associated factor. The study revealed that the prevalence of respondents exposed to secondhand smoke was much higher in bars/café/tea shops (90.07%) and restaurants (81.81%) than in any other public places, universities (36.70%), government buildings (31.12%), public transport (20.04%), healthcare facilities (17.85%) and schools (15.84%). 13.23% of respondents saw smokers violate smoke-free regulations. Among those who saw them violate smoke-free regulations, just one-third cautioned them to stop smoking. Strikingly, a higher rate of cautioning smokers to stop smoking was observed among the older, married, and better educated respondents. Respondents who were married, better educated and in lower economic status were more likely to remind smokers to stop smoking. The study has called for strengthening two of the six MPOWER (Monitor, Protect, Offer, Warn, Enforce and Raise) components of the tobacco free initiative introduced by WHO, Monitoring tobacco use and prevention policies and Protecting people from tobacco smoke.
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