Masculinities & Social Change

Journal Information
EISSN : 2014-3605
Published by: Hipatia Press (10.17583)
Total articles ≅ 127
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SCOPUS
ESCI
DOAJ
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Latest articles in this journal

Giuliano Tardivo, Maximiliano Fernández Fernández, Eduardo Díaz Cano
Published: 21 June 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 162-185; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.6733

Abstract:
The presence of Chinese immigrants and students in Spain is becoming more and more significant; therefore, it is urgent to study their culture in greater depth. In this paper, we take into consideration family relationships and the issue of male parenthood. We use as theoretical framework of reference the contributions of authors such as Beck, Bauman, Seidler, Hochschild, etc. We conducted 30 semi-structured qualitative interviews with postgraduate Chinese students at universities in Madrid. The results show that, there is still a prevalence of more traditional male fatherhood in China, far from emotions and reflexivity, which, however, are increasingly characteristics widespread in Spain and, more generally, in Western countries. Furthermore, it seems that family relations in China continue to exert a very relevant weight. The interviewees, who are familiar with the Spanish way of leaving, have highlighted the differences between China and Spain.
Chafit Ulya, Ria Dwi Puspita Sari, Kundharu Saddhono, Memet Sudaryanto
Published: 21 June 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 139-161; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.5967

Abstract:
Modernization provides a major change in the structure of human life, including in relations between men and women in the marriage life. This change creates a new dimensions of masculinity, including those found in the lyrics of dangdut koplo songs. This research was conducted to answer the question, what is the form of the new dimension that represents Javanese masculinity in the lyrics of dangdut koplo songs? This research uses descriptive qualitative method by using Jonet Saltzman Chafetz's concept of masculinity. Chafetz divides masculinity into six areas, namely physical, functional, sexual, emotional, intellectual, and impersonal. The research gives conclusion that the Javanese dangdut songs raise three dimensions of masculinity, namely functional, emotional, and intellectual. The functional dimension places men in the role of breadwinners. The emotional dimension places men in a person with high emotional stability and maturity. Meanwhile, the intellectual dimension presents a male figure with logical, rational, and realistic thoughts.
Giovane Mendieta-Izquierdo, Diana Patricia Tinjaca-Prada,
Published: 21 June 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 186-215; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.7319

Abstract:
This article aims to identify the content and organization of social representations about the concept of emotions and masculinity of young Bogota men, from a qualitative study design in the light of social representations through associative techniques such as free listings and questionnaires. In comparison by pairs to 20 young men with employment in Bogotá, Colombia, by means of proactive sampling and convenience, the analysis was carried out in the light of graph theory, after identifying the distance index. It was found that the social representation of the emotion concept is related to a feeling associated to success and motivation, as well as to emotional expressions such as: anger, joy, sadness and happiness. The masculinity concept is permeated by hegemonic elements, linked to strength, power, domination and manhood, related to responsibility and work. It is concluded that the social representation of the concepts of masculinity and emotion is diverse, it is reconciled in several peripheral elements which can be fractured and generate mobility in social representation recognizing the mandates of hegemonic masculinity and male stereotypes.
, Inmaculada Sánchez-Labella Martín
Published: 21 February 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 25-53; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.5608

Abstract:
Commercial cinema in Spain, as in the rest of the world, has gone to great lengths to describe visually, without any intention of protest, each and every one of the forms of violence against women: physical, psychological, financial, social and, lastly, sexual. Beyond insinuating and intimidating compliments and gazes, sexual violence is something that is excepted in scripts, even in those of famous directors who create powerful female characters. The aim of this paper is to know how the Spanish directors, of both sexes, represent the topic of sexual violence, paying attention to the masculinity of the characters. To this end, a content analysis was performed on twelve films from a narrative perspective. In a second stage, employing methodological triangulation and a questionnaire as a quantitative tool, university students were asked about how they perceived the scenes of sexual violence in these films. The results show, on one side, that rape is the act of sexual violence more represented and, on the other hand, a lack of awareness about the treatment of rape in Spanish cinema, as well as its rejection by young audiences.
Bibiana Edivey Castro Franco, Jaime Alberto Carmona Parra
Published: 21 February 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 77-108; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.5487

Abstract:
This article provides the result of a review of existing masculinity research within the university context. The objective of the present study was to determine the topics of analysis, characteristics, and tendencies of recent studies in this field. A search was performed in Scopus and Ebsco, using the search terms: masculinity and university students, which yielded 72 studies for analysis. The most commonly-explored topics among the investigations reviewed were as follows: the construction of masculinity, masculine social norms and gender stereotypes, romantic relationships, masculinity and health, attitudes toward sexual minorities and their effects, masculinity and violence, and masculinity and alcohol consumption. It was concluded that the shaping of masculinity in the university environment is a complex experience, influenced by the intermixing of traditional masculinity and vested with cultural, social, historical, and personal factors.
Sukhdev Singh
Published: 21 February 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 54-76; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.5933

Abstract:
The idea of masculinity is malleable in the Kāmasūtra. This study pinpoints the factors that build or refashion masculinity. It hinges on the economic stability or declination, and undergoes changes accordingly. This study suggests that economic declination might create a category of service providers, for instance, the veśyā, sub-Nāgaraka and the tṛtīyā prakṛti, or third nature, person who corroborate malleability and fluidity of masculinity. This study also suggests that idea of masculinity is disturbed when females enter the masculine domain of kāma-related knowledge. Overall, kāma is not exclusively concerned with masculinity.
, Anastasia Téllez Infantes
Published: 21 February 2021
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 10, pp 1-24; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2021.4710

Abstract:
The article that is presented next analyse discursively the perception that men have about their advantage situation or privilege (the patriarchal dividends in words of Raewyn Connell, 1995) as a man and in a domination system such as patriarchy (in its current times). It is thought from the theory and from an empiric approach how privilege is denied or recognised using different mechanisms of social research through that can emerge some form of recognition of it. In other words, how we can tackle the complexity of this object from a technic-methodologic point of view and what kind of tools is offering us socio-anthropology, such as the biographic interviews for instance, as this technique facilitate the generation of a communicative situation where particular implicit forms of privilege recognition could appear discursively. The analysis also focuses in how it could facilitate a breaking principle with the traditional model of masculinity characteristic of hegemonic ideological representations of gender, facilitating in this way the construction of alternative masculinities more equalitarian
, Alicia Martinez Sanz
Published: 21 October 2020
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 9, pp 235-260; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2020.5663

Abstract:
Objective: We present an analysis of the main characteristics of male sexual violence in partner relationships (types of sexual behaviour, male coercion methods and women’s reactions) as well as their prevalence. Method: The sample consisted of 110 women who attended public specialist support centres for women over 12 months. For the study, the women were grouped according to whether or not they mentioned partner violence (PV or NPV respectively), in an ex post facto design. Semi-structured interviews were used for the Exploration of Sexual Violence (ESV). Results: Descriptive, statistical and comparative analysis of the information showed no statistically significant differences in the types of sexual violence, that the most common method of coercion used is physical force, and that the most significant reactions are explicit refusal in the case of the PV group and active participation and feigning enjoyment in the NPV group. Conclusions: Our data shows that, when it is explored, both the PV and the NPV groups describe the male sexual violence exerted by their partners.
, Vincent Pacheco
Published: 21 October 2020
Masculinities & Social Change, Volume 9, pp 261-283; https://doi.org/10.17583/mcs.2020.5157

Abstract:
Recently, the resurrection of authoritarian tendencies in the form of populist movements has conscripted the fascistic aesthetic for its purposes. The rise of populism coincides with the rise of the digital world with its rapid mobility of images and text. Consequently, this has offered an effective platform for the dissemination of a new populist aesthetic. In a specific Philippine post-colonial context, how might we reflect and look at the aesthetics of populism? In this paper, we examine Rodrigo Duterte’s deployment of spectacle, sign, and symbol drawing from the critical resources of psychoanalytic and semiotic theory. Our position is that hegemonic masculinity is able to repackage itself depending on the contingencies of the historical moment. Furthermore, we argue that the new aesthetic of populism in the Age of Duterte reformulates the old iterations of masculinity to maintain its dominance over the Philippine socio-cultural present.
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